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by andrew sullivan

Dahlia Lithwick puzzles over the recent spate of high-impact SCOTUS decisions that came in the form of injunctions and cert denials. She looks to explain why “unsigned, unexplained reasoning is the new black”: Between the state legislatures getting...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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Last week, we covered announcements from Facebook and Apple about covering the cost of female employees freezing their eggs. Megan McArdle raises an unaddressed concern: What I haven’t seen anyone explain is when, exactly, you’ll be ready. For most...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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In an interview about her forthcoming book, Becoming Un-Orthodox: Stories of Ex-Hasidic Jews, Lynn Davidman offers a glimpse of what life is like in Hasidic communities: They’re taught to be modest: Aside from dressing in an unrevealing way, this means...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Sunday, October 19, 2014
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There have been posts I’ve written over the past decade and a half on this blog that have left me with a very heavy heart. Absorbing the full meaning of what was revealed at Abu Ghraib was one; reflecting on the horrifying child-abuse in the Catholic...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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Jordan Gaines Lewis explains: Describing ourselves on paper, while blindly attempting to live up to the expectations of others, makes it all feel like a giant lie, doesn’t it? Of course, personal statements and cover letters add a particularly thorny...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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Jon Walker asks around: “About four months” is theoretically the absolute fastest that stores could begin selling recreational marijuana in the District after the D.C. Council adopts new legislation, according to Rabbi Jeff Kahn. As the operator...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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Christopher Ingraham maintains that “the news coming out of Colorado and Washington is overwhelmingly positive.” And that other nations are paying attention: Countries, particularly in Latin America, are starting to apply these lessons in order to...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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Last week was a volatile one for the S&P 500, starting with the worst three-day decline since 2011. Robert Shiller contends that “fundamentally, stock markets are driven by popular narratives, which don’t need basis in solid fact. True or not,...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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That’s what Matt O’Brien declares: You can see that above. Inflation is just 1.6 percent in China, 1.5 percent in the U.S., 1.2 percent in the U.K., and a minuscule 0.3 percent in the Eurozone. Then there’s Japan, which is harder to compare since...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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Michelle Cottle examines how technology is making it easier to cheat – and easier to get caught: In an earlier era, a suspicious husband like Jay might have rifled through Ann’s pockets or hired a private investigator. But having stumbled upon Find...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Sunday, October 19, 2014
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Surveying the independent politicians on today’s scene, from Michael Bloomberg to current South Dakota Senate candidate Larry Pressler, Michael Kazin waxes nostalgic for when the term meant more than press-pleasing moderation: “Independent” wasn’t...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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Liam O’Brien entertainingly surveys the history of computer-generated literature: Vonnegut made up a computer that wrote love poems in 1950 – and the Brits did the same thing, but IRL. The reason why you don’t have a bunch of computer-written books...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Saturday, October 18, 2014
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A Life Worth Living—Camus on our search for meaning and why happiness is our moral obligation http://t.co/k5uYp9m8jw pic.twitter.com/2wDu6HmHig — Maria Popova (@brainpicker) September 22, 2014 Malcolm Jones turns to the author of The Plague as an...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Monday, October 20, 2014
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Robert Jones notes that “the number of white evangelical Protestants nationwide has slipped from 22 percent in 2007 to 18 percent today.” He thinks “the fact that there are currently five Southern states—Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana,...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Sunday, October 19, 2014
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Researcher Helen Weng suggests that certain forms of meditation amount to “weight training” in empathy: In a study my colleagues and I conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Center for Investigating Healthy Minds (directed by Dr. Richard...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Sunday, October 19, 2014
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In a series of exchanges with Sayed Kashua, an Israeli-Palestinian writer who expatriated to the US this summer, Etgar Keret explains why he maintains hope that change will come to Israel: It’s easy for me to understand why so many Israelis have chosen...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Sunday, October 19, 2014
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The inevitable media headline from the final Relatio of the Synod on the Family will be: “Bishops scrap welcome to gays.” And this is literally true. The astonishing mid-term Relatio’s language of outreach, inclusion and welcome shrank last night...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Sunday, October 19, 2014
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David Shaftel isn’t feeling it. He scoffs that the “meal has spread like a virus from Sunday to Saturday and has jumped the midafternoon boundary”: Once the domain of Easter Sunday, it has become a twice-weekly symbol of our culture’s increasing...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Sunday, October 19, 2014
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In a follow-up interview to his comments featured in our “The Trouble with Islam” thread, Reza Aslan elaborates on what the New Atheists get wrong about religion: I think the principle fallacy of not just to the so-called New Atheists, but I think...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Sunday, October 19, 2014
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Emma Green highlights some surprising findings about how childhood influences churchgoing as an adult: [B]irth order seems to matter: middle children are more likely than their older or younger siblings to lose their attachment to religion as they get...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Sunday, October 19, 2014
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You know that #Gamergate hashtag you've been seeing in your feeds? This is what it means: http://t.co/fXcVvSsPCZ pic.twitter.com/jaWZy8lyMI — CNN (@CNN) October 16, 2014 The controversy over violent, misogynistic trolling in the gamer community returned...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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David Chang explains why he prefers a frosty Bud Light to artisanal microbrews: I remember watching my grandfather mow the lawn on a ninety-degree day in Virginia, and as soon as he finished, he’d ask me to fetch him a can of ice-cold beer. He’d...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Saturday, October 18, 2014
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In a review of Poets in Their Youth, Eileen Simpson’s 1982 memoir of her marriage to John Berryman, Lisa Levy contemplates what inspired the poet and his contemporaries Robert Lowell and Delmore Schwartz – and what drove them apart from their spouses:...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Saturday, October 18, 2014
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Thursday marked the 160th birthday of Oscar Wilde. To celebrate, TNR republished a classic essay from their archives by George Woodcock, who pondered the writer’s enduring appeal: Wilde’s broadest appeal lies in the mood of daring thought and enthusiasm...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Saturday, October 18, 2014
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Critics are raving about the show featuring Rembrandt’s later works at London’s National Gallery: This show is a blockbuster, make no mistake. You know it from the instant you step into the first room, housing four spectacular self-portraits. Dark,...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Saturday, October 18, 2014
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Last weekend’s post about mind-controlled artificial limbs left a reader his shaking head: It frankly drives me crazy to watch videos about developments in myoelectric upper-extremity prosthetics like the one you posted and to read commentators like...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Saturday, October 18, 2014
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Martin Amis’ new novel, The Zone of Interest, takes place in the death camps at Auschwitz. Sophie Gilbert provides an overview: The Zone of Interest is a strange book, indeed; a grim satire, part office comedy, part romance, part lyrical dissection...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Saturday, October 18, 2014
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Stefany Anne Golberg considers why Sartre turned down the Nobel Prize in Literature: Written words are a compact between writer and reader. “A writer should never say to himself,” wrote Sartre in What Is Literature?, “‘Bah! I’ll be lucky if...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Saturday, October 18, 2014
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In the latest Atlantic cover-story, Hanna Rosin explores the ubiquity of teen sexting: A consistent finding is that sexting is a pretty good indicator of actual sexual activity. This year, researchers in Los Angeles published a study of middle-schoolers...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Saturday, October 18, 2014
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Fred Kaplan reviews Laura Poitras’ new Snowden documentary: At one very interesting point in the film, Snowden tells Poitras and Greenwald, “Some of these documents are legitimately classified,” and their release “could do great harm” to intelligence...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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It is conducting “1,000 interviews with white people from all walks of life and localities in which they are asked about their relationship to, and their understanding of, their own whiteness.” The trailer: The project got ridiculed on Twitter last...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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We’ve been winning it, according to Nick Miller. His research “suggests that nuclear domino effects are real and that U.S. policy has been crucial in preventing them from reaching fruition“: In the wake of the Chinese nuclear test, for example,...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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Jordan Pearson flags a first-of-its-kind “addiction”: San Diego doctors recently identified the first case of “internet addiction” involving Google Glass in a 31 year-old Navy serviceman who checked himself into rehab for alcohol abuse. His symptoms...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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Dara Lind parses a new report from Human Rights Watch on the plight of Hondurans who came to the US illegally to escape gang violence, got deported, and are now in grave danger back in their home country: The Hondurans interviewed in the report fled...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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Aaron Blake flags a new Kaiser Family Foundation poll showing that most Americans don’t know – or don’t believe – that Ebola can only be transmitted by patients who already have symptoms: In addition, 25 percent of Americans wrongly think that...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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It was inevitable, but the tenor of some of the comments coming from the more traditionalist cardinals at the synod in Rome is getting sharper. Below is Cardinal Pell laying into the outreach to the currently excluded and marginalized: You’ll notice...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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A reader points to the above NSFW scene in reference to me claiming that Harvey Keitel had “the most famous dick-shot in movie-history”: I beg to differ! Surely the big reveal of Jaye Davidson‘s, um, davidson in The Crying Game takes the title?...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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Kevin Spacey played Ron Klain in “Recount.” Kevin Spacey was in “Outbreak.” Thus, Ron Klain —> Ebola czar. — daveweigel (@daveweigel) October 17, 2014 This morning, Obama appointed political operative Ron Klain as his point-person (er,...
From: The Atlantic | By: Andrew Sullivan | Friday, October 17, 2014
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