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ACTIVISTS on warring sides of the abortion debate rarely take the same position when it comes to Supreme Court cases involving women’s rights. But pro-choicers and pro-lifers have found common cause in Young v United Parcel Service, a pregnancy discrimination...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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GOFUNDME bills itself as a crowdfunding site where visitors can discover “Amazing Stories from Incredible People”. A swift scroll through the projects does yield some impressive stories—a special-needs teacher who got hit by a car trying to save...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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ON SEPTEMBER 23rd 120-odd presidents and prime ministers will gather in New York for a UN meeting on climate change. It is the first time the subject has brought so many leaders together since the ill-fated Copenhagen summit of 2009. Now, as then, they...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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A TENET of journalism in some quarters is that three examples make a credible story. The Asahi Shimbun, Japan’s leading left-of-centre newspaper, with a circulation of 7.3m, is battling for its reputation after a third embarrassing retraction. On September...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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THE Supreme Court of Bangladesh has just rejected appeals by a former prime minister, Khaleda Zia, over the appointment of a judge in a corruption case against her. The ruling clears the way for Mrs Zia to stand trial. Prosecutors accuse her of having...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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IT IS now nearly a year since the roll-out of Obamacare. The launch was a shambles, and Obamacare is a totem for every American who hates big government. Republicans will deride it, yet again, in the mid-term elections.Obamacare is indeed costly and...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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A BIG oil producer unable to pay its bills during a protracted oil-price boom is a rare beast. Thanks to colossal economic mismanagement, that is exactly what Venezuela, the world’s tenth-largest oil exporter, has become.At the end of the second quarter...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Full to overflowing WAS the tumour malignant? Nguyen Thi Hoat’s doctors could not tell because their public hospital lacks brain-scanners. Ms Hoat’s only option was to travel 130km (80 miles), on the back of her sister’s motorbike, from her village...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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CHENMED doesn’t look like much. Its clinic north of Miami has a modest waiting area and circle of examination rooms. But every action is engineered and tracked. Jennifer Thomas, the chief operations officer, pores over data. Whiteboards on her walls...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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JACK MELLIGAN, a prison guard in Sacramento, was tired of staring at his brown, patchy lawn—a side-effect of the drought that has parched California for the past three years. He thought about replacing it with shop-bought turf, but worried that he...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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THE clue is in the name. The Shanghai Co-operation Organisation (SCO) groups six countries—China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan—and aims to be the dominant security institution in its region; but its origin and purposes...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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ECONOMICS is a global business; the markets wait tensely for the latest statement from the Federal Reserve, or the latest clues as to the strength of the Chinese economy. Tighter US monetary policy, or a collapse in Chinese demand, would affect every...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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SO the markets and the gamblers were right. Despite the closeness of the opinion polls and the anecodotal evidence of vast enthusiasm for the Yes campaign, Scotland voted No by a margin of 10 percentage points.As a result, the market reaction has been...
From: The Economist | Friday, September 19, 2014
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STANDING before 10 Dowing Street earlier this morning, David Cameron took the initiative. The prime minister has not had an excellent Scottish referendum, despite the solid No victory. As the polls closed last night it looked like he would face an angry...
From: The Economist | Friday, September 19, 2014
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THE defeat of nationalism in Scotland can be put down to any number of interventions. Gordon Brown, who delivered some storming speeches late in the campaign, will be celebrated as the union's saviour. Few are likely to credit the politician sometimes...
From: The Economist | Friday, September 19, 2014
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IN THE final weeks of the Scottish referendum campaign, it became a cliché to say that the political tremors emitted by a No vote would be almost as violent as those from a Yes vote. This was an exaggeration. If Yes had prevailed, it would probably...
From: The Economist | Friday, September 19, 2014
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THE Union flag will still fly. By a margin of 55% to 45%, and on a vast 86% turnout, Scots voted to stick with the United Kingdom on September 18th. Thereby they ensured the continuation of the nation state that shaped the modern world and still retains...
From: The Economist | Friday, September 19, 2014
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IT IS difficult to match central Tokyo’s gleaming plantation of concrete spires today with grainy images of the rickety capital in 1959. Still rebuilding from America’s wartime firebombing, Japan’s capital stunned the world by winning the right...
From: The Economist | Friday, September 19, 2014
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FIERY political opinions have dominated the Scottish independence debate. A rising structure in the Borderlands offers a more poignant contributionContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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GOVERNMENTS meet in New York for the UN climate summit, Sierra Leone implements a curfew to combat Ebola and Europe's separatist movements take notes from Scotland's referendumContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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AN EDICT issued by South Sudan’s ministry of labour on September 16th caused international havoc by telling all foreigners working in the country (save diplomats and government aid agencies) to leave within a month. But the next day the foreign minister,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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SAVINGS RATES in many developing countries are too low. As we argue in this week’s print edition, many poor people in developing countries struggle to save because of demands on their cash—say, from greedy family members or neighbours. Myopia—where...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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The days of human cargo “LA BESTIA” (“The Beast”) still trundles along the length of Mexico, from Guatemala to the United States. But the infamous freight train has fewer people perched on its roof and clinging to its sides. Since last month...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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How to recruit 300m opponents BARACK OBAMA does not call it a war and Congress has not passed a war powers resolution. Yet America is poised to begin officially arming and training rebels fighting against Islamic State (IS) in Syria, where the CIA has...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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DRUG traffickers, like everyone else, only want money because they want what money can buy. But turning dirty cash from drug sales into clean, usable currency has become harder for Mexican drug gangs as a result of tighter banking regulations at home...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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FOR months the world has sat largely idle as an Ebola epidemic has marched steadily from the remote jungles of Guinea to the slums of Liberia, and beyond. On September 16th that changed. Barack Obama announced the largest humanitarian deployment by America’s...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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TEXAS has a higher share of uninsured citizens than any state in America. Until recently Shane, a 38-year-old from Houston, was one of them. “I just couldn’t afford it,” he says. Shane has HIV; his job does not cover him. Because of his illness,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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“I LIKE to pay taxes,” said Oliver Wendell Holmes. “With them I buy civilisation.” Most people recognise that taxes pay for public services, but few are as keen to stump up for them as Justice Holmes was. High income taxes tend to discourage...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Even the buskers are good in Nashville COUNTRY MUSIC manages to be both hugely popular and utterly unfashionable. Toby Keith, a former oil worker from Oklahoma whose songs include “I Like Girls That Drink Beer”, made $65m last year: more than the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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What would Ray Rice have to do to lose your support? NO PASTIME unites America like the National Football League (NFL). During the 2013 autumn season, 34 of the 35 most-watched shows on television were NFL games. Though non-Americans may puzzle over...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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IS HILLARY CLINTON preparing a run for the White House? Before pondering that timely question, consider another which may matter just as much. Why would any Democrat want to become president in 2016?Mrs Clinton is certainly giving people cause to ask...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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IN 1974 two chemistry professors, Frank Rowland and Mario Molina, predicted that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), a set of chemicals used in refrigeration, would gradually decompose, release chlorine into the stratosphere and break down the ozone layer which...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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ONCE again, Latin America has a growth problem. After a dozen golden years of economic expansion and falling poverty, the region is likely to grow by only around 1.5% this year. Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela are suffering recessions of varying severity....
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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VERBING nouns annoys a lot of people. Traditional complaints include those against "to impact", "to chair" and "to author". And newly verbed nouns are continually entering the language: from "to login", to "to Facebook", and "to friend". But we forget...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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THE Biennale des Antiquaires—on in Paris until September 21st—is a famously theatrical affair. It takes place under the domed glass roof (the largest in Europe) of the Grand Palais in a hall ringed with sinuous, cast-iron Art Nouveau balconies and...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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GUESTS at nice hotels in low-crime areas should feel safe leaving their belongings in their rooms. I am frequently away for business and personal travel, and most of the time I feel fine about leaving my computer in plain view (I have remote backup software,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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How kids compare against their parents’ level of schoolingSOCIAL mobility, or the lack of it, gnaws at the consciences of governments. Better opportunities for those born without the local equivalent of a silver spoon in the mouth is a common electoral...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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POLES who risked their lives, and those of their families, to save Jews during the Holocaust are to be honoured with a monument (pictured above), to be constructed next year close to the new Museum of the History of Polish Jews. The design contest has...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Brazil’s president, Dilma Rousseff, who is hoping to be granted a second term in next month’s elections, has claimed that only a vote for her can ensure the continuation of the country’s best-known anti-poverty programme, the Bolsa Família. Since...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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WHEN Li Keqiang, China’s prime minister, spoke at a big business meeting earlier this month, he trumpeted two achievements. Not only had the government overseen steady economic growth, he said, but it had done so without resorting to a big stimulus....
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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ON HIS tour of South Asia this week, President Xi Jinping of China went out of his way to be reassuring. In Male, the cramped capital of the Maldives, he spoke of his dream of a “maritime Silk Road” to increase trade across the Indian Ocean. He proffered...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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ASK a resident of Fuping county in rural Shaanxi province what the Chinese president has done for them, and they point to the smooth asphalt road beneath their feet. Since Xi Jinping came to power, the birthplace and burial site of his father has become...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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HE PETS calves, cups babies’ cheeks and kicks footballs. He laughs and smiles in public. He holds his own umbrella, shuns a limousine, carries his own bowl of dumplings to a restaurant table and sits crossed-legged in a farmer’s hut. His glamorous...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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FOR four days this week Australia was run from a tent in a tropical-bush setting. Tony Abbott, the prime minister, was fulfilling a pledge to spend one week each year living with indigenous communities. On September 14th he took up residence in Arnhem...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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THE madness unleashed by the rule of a charismatic despot, Mao Zedong, left China so traumatised that the late chairman’s successors vowed never to let a single person hold such sway again. Deng Xiaoping, who rose to power in the late 1970s, extolled...
From: The Economist | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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For those watching the Federal Reserve's meeting which ended today, no news was good news. The Fed, as expected, said it would end its bond buying programme (also known as quantitative easing) next month. Many in the market wondered if it would then...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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THE troonrede, the annual speech delivered by the Dutch monarch to parliament, is in part an occasion for sounding the national mood, and in part an occasion for prominent women to wear exceptionally silly hats. It takes place on a day the Dutch call prinsjesdag,...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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NO pastime unites America like the National Football League (NFL). During the 2013 autumn season, 34 of the 35 most-watched shows on television were NFL games. Though non-Americans may puzzle over the game’s allure, football offers advertisers one...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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“THE final lie” was what some Argentines called the December 2013 inflation figures published by their country’s statistics agency (INDEC). After the IMF threatened to censure the country for tampering with inflation data, in January INDEC rolled...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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DEBT forgiveness, and the redesign of debt contracts to involve more risk-sharing, is the answer to the problem of recurrent financial crises. That is the argument of two economists, Atif Mian and Amir Sufi, in their book "House of Debt" (our Free Exchange...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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