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THE fear of imminent death does not dominate the minds of many when amorously entwined. But such a feeling is common for male spiders. They get just two shots at shacking up with potentially peckish females ten times their size. Yet for all a male spider’s...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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The depths of California’s droughtCALIFORNIA is ending its warmest winter on record, aggravating what could well be the region’s worst drought in 500 years, according to paleoclimatologists. It has devastated the state. Some small communities may...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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WHEN generators were fired up for the morning shift, the walls of the adjacent buildings would begin to judder—a sign of the catastrophe to come. When Rana Plaza, a building in the industrial outskirts of Bangladesh’s capital, Dhaka, with six factory...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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At The Economist's Japan summit on April 17th, President Shinzo Abe discussed why his country must "completely cast off" its inward focus, how he intends to create an "unshakable foundation" for growth and why "womenomics" matters.Continue reading...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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A GIANT eucalyptus tree sprawls across a room in the Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane, stopping visitors in their tracks. An even more arresting vision awaits in the next room, which has been turned into a lake surrounded by 99 life-sized animal replicas....
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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AND he’s back. Just over a month after Gustavo Petro was ousted as mayor of Bogotá, he has been reinstated on the orders of a local tribunal. In March President Juan Manuel Santos approved his removal, after Colombia’s inspector-general, Alejandro...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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MATTHEW YGLESIAS had an excellent piece at Vox on Monday pointing out a fundamental shift that has taken place over the past few years in our understanding of the economics of inequality. He begins by considering an "everything-you-need-to-know-about-economics"...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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WHEN President François Hollande was elected in 2012 he vowed to shift Europe away from austerity and towards a more growth-friendly policy. And late last month, when he was appointed prime minister, Manuel Valls strongly hinted that he did not intend...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Diabetes is a growing and lethal problem, especially among ArabsWHEN countries become rich and waistlines grow, so does the risk of diabetes. The number of sufferers almost doubled over the past decade, and today afflicts 382m. Much of that increase...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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NASA discovers the most Earth-like planet yet, intrigue surrounds Russia's version of Facebook and how to make graphene in your kitchenContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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YESTERDAY, as expected, the Supreme Court upheld, by a 6-2 vote, a 2006 amendment to the Michigan state constitution banning race-sensitive admissions policies in public universities. With Justice Elena Kagan recused (she had worked on the case as United...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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LAST week, US Airways, which is in the midst of a merger with American Airlines, suddenly started trending on Twitter. But the surge in interest wasn't about the airlines' big deal. Rather, it was because someone on the company's social media team had...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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TODAY’S batch of business surveys paint a reassuring picture of the euro-zone recovery. Though better than nothing this was pretty sluggish last year, starting with growth of just 0.3% in the second quarter, which slipped to 0.1% in the third and 0.2%...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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WHY do some places in the world have lots of small languages, and others have fewer, bigger languages? Earlier studies seemed to show that areas of high altitude, rainfall and temperature had high cultural and linguistic diversity. A brief glance in...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Chinese tourists are spending a lot...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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THE PhoneSat's name is literal: it contains the functional innards of a phone reformulated to fit into a satellite. The fourth iteration, and fifth physical version, of NASA's PhoneSat was put into low-earth orbit (LEO) on April 18th as part of the SpaceX...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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THERE were few more revered figures in this country’s long struggle for democracy than Win Tin, who died on April 21st at the age of 84 (or 85, as some have it). A co-founder with Aung San Suu Kyi and others of the National League for Democracy (NLD),...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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“WE’VE got a great succession plan,” Alan Mulally, Ford’s chief executive, said last week at the Beijing International Automotive Exhibition, adding that he had “nothing new to announce” at this point.Others seem to have made the announcement...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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REMEMBER this chart?A few weeks ago we examined research assessing the benefits of European Union membership. For most entrants joining the EU gave real output per person a big boost relative to what might have been expected. But not for Greece. Almost...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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WHAT happens when you get a traffic ticket? Probably much gnashing of teeth, perhaps a tongue-lashing from the spouse and a groaning eye-roll as you get your checkbook and slip a hundred of your hard-earned dollars into that orange envelope of shame....
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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KENNETH CUKIER, The Economist's data editor and author of a new book, discusses how big data can improve learning and why the education sector has been slow to embrace it Continue reading...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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Sergo repaints "For the Motherland" on old tanks in DonetskAs the drums of war beat louder a strange lull has descended on Ukraine’s eastern region of Donbas. In the regional capital Donetsk, offices are open, workmen mow the grass in the park and...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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A WORD of thanks to all those Chinese manufacturers who plunged into the solar-panel business and caused prices to plummet. Many have gone out of business as the subsequent glut made it difficult for any of them to turn a profit. Still, without their...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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THE leader of the Samajwadi Party (SP), Mulayam Singh Yadav, is a shrewd politician. His party runs the massive state of Uttar Pradesh and for years has propped up, from outside, the ruling Congress party in the national government. The SP is known for...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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ELECTRONIC dance music has experienced a rapid worldwide rise. The industry is now worth an estimated $20 billion and its artists can pull in million-dollar fees to perform at dance festivals. So for Will Holland, a Briton who began his career as an...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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IN a civil war that has featured the regular slaughter of civilians, the April 15th recapture of the oil town of Bentiu by South Sudanese rebels marked a new low. Some 200 people were reportedly massacred at a single mosque as the white army militia...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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LAST September a conspicuous group of visitors mingled with tourists in Zanzibar. A small horde of Omani diplomats, ministers and academics came for a three-day symposium, ostensibly on the history of Islam in east Africa. Most of the visitors, many...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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AT FIRST glance it is an unusual alliance. Activist investors usually snap up a firm’s shares before lobbying for changes in its strategy to push those shares higher. Rarely do they team up in advance with a possible buyer. But that is precisely what...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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RUMOURS of mergers among big drug firms, volatile technology stocks and the "Francis effect" ...
From: The Economist | Monday, April 21, 2014
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PLUTO, the ancient god of the underworld (pictured above), dealt with the dark and the dingy. Perhaps it is appropriate that a new email service allowing users to pull back murky messages from the depths of a recipient’s inbox bears his name.Every...
From: The Economist | Monday, April 21, 2014
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China is becoming wealthy and urban, but with people left behind  Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames.THIS week’s special report on China considers the impact of the largest migration from the countryside...
From: The Economist | Monday, April 21, 2014
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IT MAY seem odd, given Russia's poor demography, reputation for corruption (ranked 127th out of 177 nations in the transparency index, alongside Mali and Lebanon), treatment of campaigners such as Sergei Magnitzky or flawed democracy (the EIU ranks it...
From: The Economist | Monday, April 21, 2014
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Classmates remember the dead MINUTES after the Sewol, a South Korean ferry, began to list before sinking on April 16th, a schoolboy made its first distress call to the emergency services—before even the crew had radioed for help. “Save us!” he...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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INTERVIEWING Teodoro Petkoff, Bello has found, is a disconcerting experience. He responds to questions with point-blank answers, delivered faster than the pen can travel, from behind a bristling moustache in the clipped Spanish of the Caribbean rim....
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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IN GENERAL, President Enrique Peña Nieto has been treated well by Mexico’s mainstream media. His telenovela-star looks—there is seldom a hair out of place—make him easy to photograph. His ambitious reforms have provided splashy news stories. His...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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ON THE face of it, conditions are hardly propitious for an improvement in Japan’s strained relations with its East Asian neighbours. This week over 150 Japanese lawmakers paid their respects during the spring festival at the Yasukuni shrine in Tokyo...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Sabahi reaches for the sky IN A country with normal democratic politics, Hamdeen Sabahi, the sole candidate set to run against Abdel Fattah al-Sisi in Egypt’s presidential election on May 26th and 27th, would make a natural candidate for the top job....
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Turning the airwaves blue AMONG the people who noticed that something was wrong with how banks were issuing credit before the financial crisis was a Harvard professor called Elizabeth Warren. Her prescience helped to propel her from obscurity to Congress,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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WORKING out the right time to buy a house is always hard. Homes are horribly expensive. The slightest up- or down-tick in the market can cost or save huge sums. In America, those mulling a purchase are hearing particularly confusing signals. Prices have...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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World Cup runneth under? BRAZIL has the world’s biggest reserves of fresh water. That most of it sits in the sparsely populated Amazon has not historically stopped Brazilians in the drier, more populous south taking it for granted. No longer. Landlords...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Don’t breathe a word of it THE Red Sea city of Jeddah is the most relaxed spot in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia. But its residents are worried by a rise in the number of people diagnosed with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, known as MERS. Waiters at...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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CHILDREN frolicked in a river, the aroma of barbecue wafted through the air and a has-been rocker creaked his way through a set on a jerry-built stage. Cliven Bundy’s “Patriot Party”, held on April 18th at a cattle ranch 70 miles north-east of...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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OUTSIDE China, Mao Zedong is out of fashion these days, remembered less as a revolutionary hero than as a tyrant. But the currency which sports his image on its banknotes is making headway abroad. In Hong Kong some cash machines dispense the “redback”,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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FOR years Lin Chen resisted his wife’s entreaties to move abroad. Then, when their daughter was born in 2012, he started thinking about her schooling. He realised he wanted a less stressful education than the one he and his wife endured in their climb...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Was the real villain a faulty wire? ON THE morning of December 23rd 1991 a fire destroyed a home in Corsicana, Texas shared by Cameron Todd Willingham, his wife and their three daughters. The fire killed the girls; Mrs Willingham was at the Salvation...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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THE Pearl river delta in the southern province of Guangdong is no stranger to strikes, most of them small and quickly resolved. But a walk-out by workers at factories owned by a Taiwanese company, Yue Yuen, the world’s largest maker of branded sports...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Mr Mir’s most famous interviewee THERE was a time when Hamid Mir, Pakistan’s most famous journalist, had little reason to fear his work might put his life in danger. In a country where his trade has long been a dangerous game, he kept on the right...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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A rare smile for Abbas IT IS hard not to be sceptical. Palestine’s two quarrelling factions, the secular nationalists of Fatah and the Islamists of Hamas, have agreed at least half a dozen times in the past few years to merge their governments in the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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The latest mobile lonely-hearts app IN THE Middle Ages, heraldry allowed knights to show off family histories in amazing detail, lugging shields or banners into battle that explained their ancestry, whether they had married an heiress and their status...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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AL-QAEDA in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), the Yemen-based franchise of the terrorist group, has been hit by a new wave of attacks by American drones. On April 19th one nailed a car transporting suspected fighters in the central province of Bayda. Over...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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