Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

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More common than ever EVEN for a country as inured to war as Afghanistan, the strike on a crowd of peaceful protesters in Kabul on July 23rd was shocking. Bombs killed 81 people, perhaps the deadliest such attack in the capital since the civil war two...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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IN THE 1980s Japan was a closely studied example of economic dynamism. In the decades since, it has commanded attention largely for its economic stagnation. After years of falling prices and fitful growth, Japan’s nominal GDP was roughly the same in...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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Germans, not panicking ASK some Germans how people should react to terrorism and most would probably agree with the historian Herfried Münkler that the best attitude is heroische Gelassenheit: heroic calmness. Let other countries declare wars on terrorism...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, July 27, 2016
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IN A world tormented by violence, Japan is remarkably safe. Muggings are rare and the murder rate low. Last year police recorded just a single gun death in a country of 126m people. The weapon of choice when someone runs amok is a knife. And so it was...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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BIG structural changes to political parties happen only once in a generation. Academics reckon that in 219 years America has seen just six different party systems, each attracting a distinct coalition of voters. Donald Trump’s idea of turning the Republican...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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WHEN Rio de Janeiro won the right almost seven years ago to host the Olympic games in 2016, the cidade maravilhosa (wonderful city) seemed to deserve its nickname. Violence, as much part of Rio’s image as its beaches, had been falling for more than...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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TAIWAN’S first female president has had a testing start. Within weeks of Tsai Ing-wen’s inauguration in May, China announced that it had cut off important channels of communication with her government, because she refuses to accept the idea of “one...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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Will Maimane (left) or Malema hurt the ANC more? FORGET ducking and dodging corruption charges. Jacob Zuma’s new signature move is the “dab”. At rallies ahead of local government elections on August 3rd, South Africa’s 74-year-old president drops...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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Competition royally licked WHEN Steven Carse began hawking ice lollies on a corner in Atlanta, one of his best customers was a lawyer representing Unilever. Mr Carse’s brand name was King of Pops, but his marketing used the word Popsicle—a trademark...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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He has some great qualities has Toady ONE of the least understood players in Chinese politics is the former president, Jiang Zemin. On August 17th he will celebrate his 90th birthday, yet he is still thought to exert influence. Rumours swirl in Beijing...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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WHEN the presidential motorcade tears through the posh Borrowdale suburb where Robert Mugabe resides in Harare, all traffic still pulls onto the verge in reluctant deference to the despot. At 92 he is plainly bent on staying in power for as long as he...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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OUTSIDE China, the monster Three Gorges dam across the Yangzi river is one of the most reviled engineering projects ever built. It is blamed for fouling the environment and causing great suffering among the 1.2m people who were relocated to make way...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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Scoop“We’re gonna cut you off right now. We’re gonna cover right now Boyz II Men, Philadelphia’s own, is here and they’re performing onstage.”CNN cuts from demonstrators outside the convention to watch an ageing pop band No speaky“I’m...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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WHEN reading about themselves or their country’s affairs of state, China’s leaders do not like to be surprised or contradicted. They have little to worry about in conventional media, over which—for the most part—the Communist Party exerts tight...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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Surprise! JOKO WIDODO, Indonesia’s president, universally known as Jokowi, reshuffled his cabinet on July 27th for the second time since taking office in late 2014. Although observers had expected only minor fiddling, he made big changes. Most contentious...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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WHAT if all Londoners, no matter how young or frail, smoked for at least six years? In effect, they already do. The city’s air pollution exacts an equivalent toll on each resident, cutting short the lives of nearly 10,000 people each year and damaging...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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TIM KAINE, the senator from Virginia chosen by Hillary Clinton as her running-mate, is endearingly bad at hiding how excited he is by his new gig. The morning of July 27th found the rumpled ex-missionary and harmonica aficionado in Philadelphia, preparing...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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IT HAS been a good few days for Russia’s dirty-tricks squad. On July 24th the International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced it would not ban the Russian team as a whole from next month’s games in Rio de Janeiro, even though an investigation concluded...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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INTERACTIVE: Spectacular golfing collapses ALL eyes will be on Henrik Stenson at the PGA Championship, the last of the year’s four major men’s golf tournaments, which began on July 28th in Springfield, New Jersey. At the British Open two weeks before...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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IT WAS one of Silicon Valley’s most riveting success stories. Now it stands as a warning to others. Yahoo began in 1994 as a lark in Stanford’s dormitories, when two students, David Filo and Jerry Yang, assembled their favourite links on a page called...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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IN THE early hours of June 14th a suspicious neighbour spotted a man armed with an automatic rifle throwing bulging black bin liners over a convent wall in General Rodríguez, a suburb on the western fringes of Buenos Aires. The man then leapt over the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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NEAR the Seongju county office, Lee Soo-in mans a makeshift stand for citizens wanting to renounce their affiliation to the ruling Saenuri party. Over 800 have signed up in a week. Mr Lee, born in this rural town of 14,000, is stunned: conservatives...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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Looks familiar WHEN he announced plans on July 25th to strengthen Australia’s anti-terrorism laws, Malcolm Turnbull, the prime minister, declared that his administration’s “primary duty” was to keep citizens safe. Within hours Australians were...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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THERE is a Welsh style of political speech that owes more to the pulpit than the podium. It was born in the nonconformist Valleys, where mysticism, mining and Methodism mingled and produced a distinctively emotional and poetic religious culture. At its...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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“LANCASHIRE invented the world,” Iain Trickett’s grandfather told him. The old man was half right. During the industrial revolution the county in north-west England pioneered machinery that churned out manufactured goods by the ton; other countries...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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Dreaming of Donald NEVER interfere in other countries’ internal affairs, Vladimir Putin has insisted—except by invading them, bankrolling their nastiest politicians and, perhaps, conspiring to embarrass America’s Democratic Party and its presidential...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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IN THE end, Bernie Sanders came through. The senator from Vermont had threatened to take his fight for a “political revolution” to the floor of the Democratic National Convention, which was held in Philadelphia between July 25th and 28th. But when...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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The volume of world merchandise trade grew by an insipid 2.7% in 2015, the fourth year in a row that it had been below 3%. China’s slowdown and recession in places like Brazil weighed on trade. Between 1990 and 2008, trade grew twice as fast as world...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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IS POLAND’S government right-wing or left-wing? Its leaders revere the Catholic church, vow to protect Poles from terrorism by not accepting any Muslim refugees and fulminate against “gender ideology” (by which they mean the notion that men can...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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JAPAN is not, by nature, a boastful country. Its opportunities for bombast have shrunk along with its population. And its economic pride has suffered many years of deflation, a form of macroeconomic self-deprecation, in which firms and workers continuously...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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AS POLITICAL theatre, America’s party conventions have no parallel. Activists from right and left converge to choose their nominees and celebrate conservatism (Republicans) and progressivism (Democrats). But this year was different, and not just because...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 28, 2016
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NO TARGET is too soft for killers inspired by Islamic State. On July 26th in Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray, a small town in Normandy, two knife-wielding terrorists entered a church. They took hostage the 85-year-old priest celebrating mass and the tiny congregation,...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, July 27, 2016
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From: The Economist | Wednesday, July 27, 2016
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JUST like cooking a culinary masterpiece, making a hit Broadway show requires the right ingredients. The more the chef knows about the measurements and recipe, the more likely it is that a restaurant can fill its seats with new customers.
From: The Economist | Wednesday, July 27, 2016
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The hard way IYAD QASSEM is trying to run a coffee shop without water. He reuses the stuff in his sink, which quickly fills with muck, and in the shishas that Palestinians puff on his patio. It would be a difficult task, if he had many customers: but...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, July 27, 2016
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AN URGENT call to lead an extraordinary life permeates American discussions of success and happiness. A new documentary on Netflix, “I Am Not Your Guru” by Joe Berlinger, looks at Tony Robbins, the biggest motivational magnate of all, and his “Date...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, July 27, 2016
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