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IN A body politic still scarred by the two-decade dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, it has long been taboo for a president even to dream of more than one six-year term. Yet President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino, son of Corazon Aquino, who toppled Marcos...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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OF ALL the ways in which America is exceptional, its practice of electing judges is one of the least obvious and most striking. The spectacle of someone who has the power to hand out death sentences making stump speeches, seeking endorsements and raising...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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FOR other weapons exporters, the decision was easy. The Islamic State (IS) has overrun and terrorised swathes of Iraq and Syria. Germany is, with Britain and France, one of Europe’s biggest arms-makers. Fears of the possible genocide of Iraq’s Yazidis...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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IF YOU can’t beat them, change the battlefield. Argentina has been mulling a plan to replace some of its foreign bonds with locally issued ones ever since a New York court ruled in 2012 that it could not pay creditors who accepted its debt swaps of...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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IN THE first part of VICE News's extraordinary five-part documentary on ISIS, released earlier this month, a bearded and strangely innocent-looking young press officer who goes by the name Abu Mosa invites America to attack his movement. "I say to America...
From: The Economist | Friday, August 22, 2014
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ONCE thought of as a staid trade, economists are increasingly repackaging themselves for public consumption. The rise of data journalism has helped catapult practitioners of the dismal science into the public domain. However, the gap between economists’...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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WALK into a florist in America and take a deep breath: beneath the heady scents of petals and pollen, you might just catch a whiff of jet fuel. Nearly three-quarters of all the flowers sold in the US have travelled through Miami International Airport...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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Our interactive business-confidence graphicEXECUTIVES around the world are more upbeat about the prospects for business than they were a year ago, according to the latest Economist/FT survey of around 1,500 senior managers, conducted by the Economist...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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BARACK OBAMA has struck the jihadists in Iraq and—even if the action was belated and modest—he has so far been successful. But the Islamic State (IS) needs to be thwarted, so he must strike it in Syria, too. And that will prove much harder.In Iraq...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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JOSÉ MARROQUIN lives with his mother, wife and four children in a tiny apartment in a rough part of town. It costs the seven of them $1,080 a month: about two-thirds of their cash income, most of which comes from Mr Marroquin’s job as a forklift driver....
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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Reagan and welfareSIR – Your review of Rick Perlstein’s “The Invisible Bridge” contends that “grumpy Democrats” claimed that Ronald Reagan’s work-to-welfare plan as governor of California “found jobs for just one recipient in every 500”...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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THREE months after storming into office with the promise of good times for India, Narendra Modi has shown a curious mix of both resolve and caution. Certainly, leadership has been on display. At his first independence-day address, from Delhi’s Red...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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IN HIS presidential bid Eduardo Campos, the former governor of Pernambuco, set out to break the mould of Brazilian politics, polarised between the ruling left-wing Workers’ Party (PT) of President Dilma Rousseff and the centre-right Party of Brazilian...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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AFTER more than a week of rioting in Ferguson, Missouri, what can America learn? The first and simplest lesson is that cops should wear cameras. Knowing that they are being recorded, the police would be less likely to shoot suspects, and vice versa....
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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CENTRAL bankers from around the world gather this week in the foothills of the Teton mountains to hike trails and share gossip and ideas. It is an apposite time to swap notes: the rich world’s economies have taken divergent paths and the bankers at...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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IS LAVDRIM MUHAXHERI dead? At the end of July the leading Albanian jihadi fighting in Syria (pictured) was posting photos of himself on Facebook in which he appears to chop the head off a young man who he said was a spy. A few days ago the Balkan media...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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“FORESTS are the lungs of our land,” said Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Twenty years ago, the world’s lungs were diseased. Brazil, the country with more tropical trees than any other, was cutting down an area of forest two-thirds the size of Belgium...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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MATTHEW BOULTON, James Watt’s partner in the development of the steam engine and one of the 18th century’s greatest industrialists, was in no doubt about the importance of Britain’s first embassy to the court of the Chinese emperor. “I conceive”,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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THE rolling, fertile steppe of northern Kazakhstan resembles North Dakota. The climate is similar, too—perfect for rearing cattle that provide juicy steaks. It is also close to Russia, a market that is suddenly rather hungry.Long before the Russian...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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When stuck for anything insightful to say, politicians often waffle about how children are the future. They are right, of course. When the new school year begins this autumn, most children in public schools will, for the first time, be non-white, projects...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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SALES of craft beer, which tastes better than the mass-market slop, were up 17.2% last year, even as overall beer sales fell 1.9%. Small wonder the big, bland brewers want to stop you drinking it. The latest bar brawl concerns growlers; the jugs which...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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The Economist recently interviewed José Mujica, Uruguay’s president, at his farmhouse outside Montevideo (see article). Here is an edited transcript of the conversation. The Economist: You are reaching the final stretch of your five years as president....
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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TURKEY'S new president is inaugurated and the leaders of Russia and Ukraine meet to discuss ongoing tensionsContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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NEARLY every night, Felicia Pope’s house fills with smoke and tear gas. Her four-month-old granddaughter has no idea why the air stings her throat. Her family feels trapped. But the protests outside over the death of Michael Brown, a local 18-year-old,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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SET beside a lake two hours’ drive from Mexico City, Valle de Bravo brands itself a Pueblo Mágico (“Magical Town”). Normally it is a place where the capital’s wealthy residents come to sail, jet ski and show off their SUVs. Now its cobbled streets...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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DRIVING north-west along a poplar-lined road from the city of Neuquén, orchards and wineries give way to a bone-dry land of stubborn brush, hardy wild horses and a sprinkling of Amerindian villages. Underground lies long unsuspected wealth: Vaca Muerta...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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FOR environmentalists, battling oil pipelines has become a surrogate for constraining the growth of Canada’s tar sands and their greenhouse-gas emissions. Without such proposed, but stalled, pipeline projects as Northern Gateway in Canada or Keystone...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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RICK PERRY was indicted on August 15th for “coercion” and abuse of his office. Those are serious crimes; if convicted of the latter, he could face up to 99 years in prison. Yet he seems unruffled.Mr Perry is planning to step down as governor of Texas...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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The progressive option in Alaska IF BARACK OBAMA has to spend his final two years in office using his veto as often as his golf clubs, he will curse Alaska’s primary voters. On August 19th Republicans picked Dan Sullivan to run for the US Senate, a...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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AMERICAN airport security is a huge hassle. But thankfully, there's a partial solution—the Transportation Security Agency's Precheck programme. Travellers who have Precheck—which is available to elite-level frequent flyers and people who pay the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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IN THE dog days of August, Japan and one of its former colonies, South Korea, mark a string of painful anniversaries. The culmination must be for the end of the second world war every August 15th, which is celebrated as “Liberation Day” by the Koreans....
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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SOCIAL MEDIA erupted this week with footage of Tom Foley, an American journalist, brutally beheaded at the hands of ISIS. YouTube removed one version of the video, citing a violation of their policy on violent content. On Tuesday, Twitter announced...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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TEN days after America carried out its first air strike on August 8th against the Islamic State (IS) on Iraqi territory, government forces regained control of the biggest dam in the country, near Mosul, the country’s second city. A ferocious al-Qaeda-inspired...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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BANK OF AMERICA’S shares fell a bit, early on August 20th, before an unexpected bounce in the afternoon left them up for the day. The jump would be of little moment but for the event that provoked it—a report that it was, as The Economist went to...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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AN ALARMING assumption is taking hold in some quarters of both Beijing and Washington, DC. Within a few years, China’s economy will overtake America’s in size (on a purchasing-power basis, it is already on the cusp of doing so). Its armed forces,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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“MARK my word,” Henry Ford declared in 1940, “A combination of airplane and motorcar is coming. You may smile, but it will come.” No doubt flying cars will eventually make their fashionably late arrival on the scene. But for the more immediate...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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WE ARE covering the 5th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences, held in a small, pretty Bavarian town. It is a unique event, with about half the living Nobel laureates in attendance. Each gives a talk about their research and then leads a small class to...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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IT IS not every day that Prospero sits in church with a roster of bikers and rockers straight from central casting. But earlier this week, at the Union Chapel in north London, your correspondent found herself seated in a venue that is used for prog-rock...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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Why university books in America are so expensive...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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ON AUGUST 19th Australia’s government announced that it would release more than 1,500 asylum-seekers from detention, all of them children. Advocates for the refugees welcomed the news. The immigration ministry however is not about to soften the conservative...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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 CROSSING the Oresund bridge from Denmark to Sweden is not merely a matter of a cringe-inducing toll (360 Danish kroner, about $66). Those making the trip, as Johnson did recently on holiday, will suddenly find, like the driver whose favourite radio...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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IMRAN KHAN, a former star cricketer turned politician, is overly fond of cricketing metaphors. For the past six days he has delivered speeches peppered with corny references to the sport, to cheers from the thousands of followers he has protesting on...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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STARWOOD HOTELS is rolling out a robot to help fulfil room-service requests for its guests. The butler known as a "botlr" is being tested in its Cupertino hotel in Silicon Valley (naturally) with a view to expanding its presence worldwide. Botlrs come...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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"HARDCORE baby! Nothing gets in our way! Boom! The hardcore Clippers, that’s us!” At his official unveiling as owner of the Los Angeles Clippers basketball team this week (pictured), Steve Ballmer, the former chief executive of Microsoft, was his...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, August 19, 2014
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THIS week our correspondents discuss the Uber-Lyft rideshare war and dust particles from interstellar space Continue reading...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, August 19, 2014
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THE ECONOMIST recently published an article about the costs and benefits of various kinds of zero- and low-carbon energy, “Sun, wind and drain”. The article was based on research by Charles Frank of the Brookings Institution (whose paper is here)....
From: The Economist | Friday, August 22, 2014
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We invite you to predict when China’s economy will overtake America’s Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames.LESS than two centuries ago, China was far and away the world’s biggest economy. It accounted...
From: The Economist | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Neighbour languagesAfter paying the exorbitant toll to cross the bridge from Denmark to Sweden there is a curious shift in languages. Our Johnson columnist explores how the Danish, Norwegian and Swedish tongues are more or less mutually intelligible...
From: The Economist | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Oceans seem to explain the pause in global warmingFOR the past few years, one of the biggest puzzles in climate science has been: where did all the global warming go? Many scientists have thought that, if average surface air temperatures have barely...
From: The Economist | Friday, August 22, 2014
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IN 2010 the British Film Institute (BFI) set up an initiative to track down 75 of the most important British films to have gone missing since they were first screened. "Missing" is a relative term as some of the titles on the list are in fact available...
From: The Economist | Friday, August 22, 2014
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