Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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Growth hits a five-year low, but industrial output is on the riseCHINA’S economy slowed to 7.3% year-on-year growth in the third quarter, slipping below the official target of 7.5%. For most countries, growth above 7% would be a rare triumph. For China,...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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NEW YORK is a tough town. An unpredictable one, too. The city has hosted any number of musical dramas that brim with controversy, courtesy of John Adams, an American composer, and Peter Sellars, an American theatre director. One humanised Richard Nixon,...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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BRAZIL is on tenterhooks. With five days to go before the presidential run-off on October 26th the race remains too close to call. But for the first time since the first round of voting two weeks ago the left-wing incumbent, Dilma Rousseff, has gained...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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 "NOSTALGIA", the latest album from Annie Lennox, the British singer-songwriter, recalls an era of smoky clubs and street-corner swing. Many of the tracks, including Hoagy Carmichael’s “Memphis in June” and “Georgia on My Mind,” George Gershwin’s...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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DID Vladimir Putin really tell Donald Tusk that Poland should join with Russia in partitioning Ukraine? That, according to Ben Judah in Politico, is the story told by Radek Sikorski [pictured above], Poland’s former foreign minister. In an interview,...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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AMID the sell-off in global equities over the past month, one market has made for an unlikely safe haven. While American, European and Japanese stock indices have fallen by roughly 5-9% since late September, Chinese stocks have been flat. For a market...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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IN 2012, Amanda Sharp and Matthew Slotover, the founders of Frieze—the colourful, sometimes raucous art fair in Regent’s Park, London—launched a new, overlapping event nearby. Frieze Masters, they hoped, would demonstrate the ways in which old...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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AS UNPLEASANT as global economic conditions look just now we can at least be thankful that things aren't anywhere near as bad as they were in 2009, to say nothing of 1931. Neither are those sorts of nasty scenarios a risk. Right?There are lots of reasons...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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WEIRDLY enough, Japan is still a land where you can’t move to the rhythm in a nightclub after midnight. This is despite years of campaigning by Japan’s youth. Yet nothing they have done has succeeded in changing laws—from the time of Japan's postwar...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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THE most improbable bike path in the world is surely on the MacArthur causeway, a road connecting Miami Beach with the city of Miami proper. The road–more a motorway really–has six wide lanes of traffic and a maximum speed limit of 50mph. This being...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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“IT IS in my power | To o’erthrow law, and in one self-born hour | To plant and o’erwhelm custom,” declares Time in “The Winter’s Tale”. Alas, such fortitude was missing from Georgia Shakespeare, a 29-year-old theatre company dedicated...
From: The Economist | Monday, October 20, 2014
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LAST week, the Nobel prize in economics was awarded to Jean Tirole (see this week's Free exchange column) for his work examining the difficulties in regulating firms with substantial market power. Mr Tirole's research is as relevant as ever, thanks to...
From: The Economist | Monday, October 20, 2014
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ECONOMIST readers are not the panicky type, but just in case you weren't sure: it is okay to travel in the age of Ebola. This sort of reassurance seems to be necessary, at least for some people. A remarkable survey conducted in August found that a quarter...
From: The Economist | Monday, October 20, 2014
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THIS week our correspondents discuss deflation, the TV business and the politics of wages...
From: The Economist | Monday, October 20, 2014
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Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames....
From: The Economist | Monday, October 20, 2014
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North Africa's top oil producer is dangerously dividedON THE third anniversary of the death of Colonel Muammar Qaddafi, Libya’s former ruler, the country is violently split. It has two governments and two parliaments. Both the capital, Tripoli, and...
From: The Economist | Monday, October 20, 2014
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FRIDAY October 17th was China’s first official “Poverty Alleviation Day”, an annual convocation of “forums and fundraisers”, designed to rally efforts to combat deprivation. Of course, thanks to China’s rapid economic progress, the country...
From: The Economist | Monday, October 20, 2014
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CAN active managers outperform? Clearly, the answer, on occasion, is yes. But can they be relied upon to do so? That is a much more difficult issue; one study found that backing the worst fund managers of the previous five years was more profitable than...
From: The Economist | Monday, October 20, 2014
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TECHNOLOGY companies from Google to Audi have made remarkable strides in autonomous vehicle technology over the last few years. This progress is the more impressive given the fact that a decade ago technologists considered driving to be a near un-automatable...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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CASINOS have served Cambodia as a rare and dependable cash cow ever since the country first emerged from its decades of civil war, in the late 1990s. On the face of it this year will be no different, with the government expecting to increase its takings,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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THE bet was bound to be a risky one. In July Japan decided to restart talks with North Korea in the hope of securing the return of citizens kidnapped in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The stakes have since been raised. North Korea’s initial report...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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THIS morning, at the train station on the way to work, Gulliver did not buy a train ticket before boarding the train. Nor did he use a pre-paid travel card or show a season ticket. Like many others on the network, I merely touched my debit card on to...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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CANADA'S parliament came under attack Wednesday from what appears to be a lone gunman, who launched two separate attacks within blocks of each other and then was killed. Although the main parliamentary building was full of MPs for weekly caucus meetings,...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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THE SUPREME COURT’S weirdly busy October brings to mind an old Cadillac commercial showing a sedan gliding silently down the highway, driver calm and confident in a hermetic, leather-appointed cabin, while the announcer intones, “quietly doing things...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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MUCH has been made of the fun that "Birdman, or the Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance" pokes at artists, egos and the entertainment business. You are less likely to hear that part of what makes this film so intriguing is how closely it resembles another...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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SARAH THORNTON discusses her new book in which she dives into the lives of 33 prominent artists including Ai Weiwei, Maurizio Cattelan, Jeff Koons and Damien HirstContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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 IN 1990 Mario Vargas Llosa, the Peruvian novelist, scandalized Mexico by describing the country as “the perfect dictatorship”. He was referring to the decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) that, in keeping with its Orwellian...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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LEYLA YUNUS did not win the European Parliament's Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought this year—it went to Denis Mukwege, a Congolese gynecologist who has battled sexual violence against women—but she was one of the three finalists. That gives...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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IT WAS as though the Cold War had never ended. A hazy shape spotted by island residents in the southern Stockholm archipelago on October 17 quickly prompted suspicions of an incursion by a Russian submarine. The Swedish military leapt into action, establishing...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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The coldest time of year has not always been the most lethalWINTER is the deadliest season. That is common knowledge. But it was not always so—at least, not for nobles, the group for whom records are most complete. In a working paper for the European...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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WHATEVER happened to emerging markets? They were supposed to bail the developed economies out of the financial crisis. And they were also supposed to provide an attractive home for growth-seeking international investors seeking to escape the moribund,...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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