Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
SHINZO ABE, Japan’s prime minister, returned to power in 2012 promising to reverse a long-term fall in military spending. He has kept that pledge. On August 29th the country’s defence ministry put in a record budget request of 5.5 trillion yen ($53...
From: The Economist | Monday, September 1, 2014
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AS ONE, the supporters of the Alternative for Germany (AfD), founded only last year, cheered into the echoing vault they had rented for their election-night party next to the river Elbe in Dresden. The evening's first projection on August 31st had just...
From: The Economist | Monday, September 1, 2014
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UNUSUALLY for a European Union summit, this one was supposed to wrap up early. "We're hoping to be done by nine o'clock," said one British official cheerfully, as proceedings kicked off yesterday evening in Brussels. But it was closer to 1.00am by the...
From: The Economist | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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I GREW up in the 1980s rooting for the Washington Capitals, a hockey team that at the time was best described as hopeless. Over the past decade I have enjoyed the exploits of a much better version of that team, graced with a captain, centre forward Alex...
From: The Economist | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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“A PASSING wave.” That is how Aécio Neves, the presidential candidate of the centre-right Party of Brazilian Social Democracy (PSDB), earlier this week dismissed the rising popularity of Marina Silva. Ms Silva was propelled to the top of the centrist...
From: The Economist | Saturday, August 30, 2014
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IT IS a solemn custom in science to mark the names of collaborators who pass away during the course of an article's publication with a superscript no different than that indicating their academic affiliation. Very rare indeed is the case that five names...
From: The Economist | Friday, August 29, 2014
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RESEARCHERS at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed an algorithm that uses visual cues in photos to predict how safe people perceive different streets to be. It is easy to see how a site that presented this information could be useful...
From: The Economist | Friday, August 29, 2014
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RUSSIA’S import ban on Polish fruit and vegetables will leave Poland with a big surplus of apples by the end of the year. Last year, 677,000 tonnes of Polish apples went to Russia, accounting for 56% of Poland’s apple exports.  This year Poland...
From: The Economist | Friday, August 29, 2014
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A RECENT Johnson column on the treatment of Catalan sparked hundreds of comments. My colleague argued in favour of multilingualism in Spain on the grounds that speakers of Castilian Spanish should be “proud to learn their country’s other languages”....
From: The Economist | Friday, August 29, 2014
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Our interactive guide to the world's housing marketsHOUSE prices are going through the roof. They are rising in 18 of the 23 economies that we track. And in eight of them, prices are increasing at a faster pace than three months ago. Yet there are also...
From: The Economist | Friday, August 29, 2014
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Déjà vuBACK in the days before social media, mobile phones and private television, the surest way of signalling that you had seized political power was to take control of the state broadcaster. That is what the army did in October 1999, when it forced...
From: The Economist | Monday, September 1, 2014
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FEW Danish actors are known outside Scandinavia but, thanks to “The Killing”, Sofie Grabol is one of them. Ms Grabol played the stereotype-busting, jumper-wearing detective, Sarah Lund, in all three seasons of the Danish crime drama, and attracted...
From: The Economist | Monday, September 1, 2014
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