Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

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A PRESIDENT is swept into office after whipping up a wave of grievance and resentment. He claims to represent “the people” against internal exploiters and external threats. He purports to “refound” the nation, and damns those who preceded him....
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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TWENTY years ago Dolly the sheep, the first animal clone, was revealed to the world. She caused a sensation. Many scientists had believed cloning animals was impossible. Dolly’s creation showed that DNA in a differentiated cell could be repurposed...
From: The Economist | Friday, February 17, 2017
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AT TIMES it can feel like we are living in an episode of “Travel Futurama”. This week: flying drone taxis.
From: The Economist | Friday, February 17, 2017
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IN THE months following the release of “An Inconvenient Truth” (2006), the percentage of Americans attributing global warming to human activity rose from 41% to 50%. Six weeks after “Super Size Me” (2004) premiered, McDonald’s removed the “supersize”...
From: The Economist | Friday, February 17, 2017
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ON FEBRUARY 13th, Donald Trump signed his first major piece of legislation—“a big signing” as he put it. The law repealed a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulation that oil and mining companies should disclose their payments to foreign...
From: The Economist | Friday, February 17, 2017
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TONY BLAIR’S speech on Brexit on the morning of February 17th has attracted a predictable storm of derision.
From: The Economist | Friday, February 17, 2017
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LIKE the weather in Chicago, you don’t have to wait long for a new trend in the stockmarkets. Just a few weeks ago, investors seemed to have second thoughts about their Trump-related euphoria (which itself was a contrast to the widespread nervousness...
From: The Economist | Friday, February 17, 2017
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THIS week the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) held its first meeting of defence ministers since Donald Trump became America′s president....
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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ALTHOUGH it marks the centenary of the Bolshevik revolution in 1917, this exhibition’s true inspiration is 1932. In that year, a vast retrospective entitled “Fifteen Years of Artists of the Russian Soviet Republic” took place in the Russian State...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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IN 1922 Donald Trump’s father, Fred, left high school at 16 to work for a carpenter. He was a “very smart guy” who could “add five columns of numbers in his head”. Construction came naturally to him, too. By 1971 he had amassed a multi-million-dollar...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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Not watching Twitter FOR months Twitter, the micro-blogging service, has received the kind of free attention of which most companies can only dream. Politicians, corporate bosses, activists and citizens turn to the platform to catch every tweet of America’s...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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AFTER sweeping past a significant milestone, drivers rarely slam their vehicles into reverse. Yet General Motors (GM), which last year joined Toyota and Volkswagen in an elite group that sells over 10m vehicles a year, may be on the brink of such a manoeuvre....
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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BUILT by the Indian Space Research Organisation, the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle threw itself into the sky at 3.58am GMT on February 15th. It took with it a record-breaking 104 satellites—88 of which belonged to a single company, Planet, a remote...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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A good hombre, apparently GIVE Justin Trudeau credit for emotional intelligence. Paying his first visit to Washington after Donald Trump took office, on February 13th, the Canadian prime minister brought his host the perfect gift: a photograph of the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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VIRGINIA prides itself on being a birthplace of enduring democratic traditions. It was here that America made its first foray into representative government: in 1619, the House of Burgesses was created to govern the Virginia colony in partnership with...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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THE Chinese stockmarket is not for the faint of heart. Over the past decade punters have endured two big bubbles and two big crashes—the latest in 2015. But those still smarting from their losses can at least be thankful that they did not suffer a...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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IT IS easy to be downcast about the state of global trade. It has faced stiff headwinds in recent years: in 2016, for the first time in 15 years, it grew more slowly than the world economy. Regional and global trade deals are going nowhere, slowly. And...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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WHEN Rafael Correa first ran for Ecuador’s presidency in 2006, supporters at his rallies brandished belts in homage to their candidate, whose surname means “belt” or “strap”. “Dale correa,” or “give them a whipping,” the crowds roared....
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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THE king, wrote Charles de Marillac, the French ambassador to the court of Henry VIII, was so fickle he rendered even his word “as softened wax [that] can be altered to any form”. He was so suspicious he did “not trust a single man”. Some of...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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Last but not least “DOES HoJo still serve fried clams?” asked a Howard Johnson’s patron, using the nickname for the restaurant chain. He recently ate there for the first time in nearly 40 years. Back then, “HoJo” could be found on almost every...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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A trainee entrepreneur “WE ARE proud of our Muslim community in Michigan,” says Rick Snyder, the state’s Republican governor, sitting in his office in the grandiose Cadillac Place, the former headquarters of General Motors. Ever since his first...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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DONALD TRUMP calls it the “failing” New York Times in his tweets, but his presidency has breathed new life into the newspaper and other mainstream media outlets. The New York Times, the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal have all received...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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Not the throne he had in mind CHINA has a history of hilariously inappropriate export brand-names, including Front Gate men’s underwear, Long March luggage and, guaranteed to raise a laugh, Great Leap Forward floor polish. But it has also stumbled...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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FOR too long American workers have been ignored, President Donald Trump declared on February 13th, as he promised to “tweak” trade relations with Canada and to transform an “extremely unfair” relationship with Mexico. Flanked by the Canadian...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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THE statement by the United States Treasury Department was blunt. It alleges that Tareck El Aissami, Venezuela’s vice-president, is a “prominent” drug trafficker, who amassed great wealth through his connections to gangs across Latin America, including...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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Proud to become an American DURING his presidential campaign, Donald Trump vowed to construct a wall along America’s southern border with Mexico to curtail illegal immigration. He often gave one caveat: this “big, beautiful wall” would have a “big,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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THE last time Kim Jong Nam made the headlines he was also at an airport, travelling under a false name. In 2001 “Fat Bear”—the Chinese alias used by the son of North Korea’s leader at the time, Kim Jong Il—was arrested after arriving in Tokyo...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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DURING the commodity “supercycle”, prices largely marched up and down in unison, fuelled by the strength (or weakness) of demand in China. Since last year commodities have again been on a tear, but for more idiosyncratic reasons. In the case of copper,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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THE mascot at César E. Chávez High School in Houston, Texas, is the lobo, Spanish for wolf. Most of the pupils are Latino. The school is not the traditional pipeline for black colleges, yet last week Texas Southern University (TSU), a historically...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 16, 2017
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