Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
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How it works.

What to do:
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  2. Click smileys and frownies
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GWYNETH WILSON first spent summer on Block Island 58 years ago. She became a year-round resident five years ago because she loves island life, except for her high electricity bills. The island, which is about a dozen miles (20km) off the coast of Rhode...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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IN RECENT years a variety of global names in journalism have been put forward as potential buyers of the Financial Times. But it came as a surprise when, on July 23rd, the FT’s owner, Pearson, announced that it was selling the newspaper to Nikkei of...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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No longer exaggerated AS RECENTLY as July 15th Mullah Muhammad Omar, the one-eyed leader of the Taliban, reassured his followers that no religious prohibition barred negotiations with the hated American-backed government in Kabul, the Afghan capital....
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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IT TAKES some guts to be a bear about the sector you cover if you are an investment strategist. Generally speaking, strategists are employed by banks and banks are in the business of selling securities, the clients are fund managers who do well when...
From: The Economist | Friday, July 31, 2015
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SAN FRANCISCO was one of several cities dubbed the “Paris of the West” in the early 20th century. The description was inspired by the charms of the Tenderloin district, an area that bustled with commerce and high culture after it avoided the worst...
From: The Economist | Friday, July 31, 2015
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THE OLIVE oil industry is in a bad way. World output is expected to fall to by a third to 2.3m tonnes this year, its lowest level since 2000. The shortfall is largely due to arid weather in Spain, the world’s biggest producer, and Xylella fastidiosa,...
From: The Economist | Friday, July 31, 2015
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IN JUNE, a report revealed that undercover American government agents, posing as passengers, had repeatedly snuck weapons through security checks at the country’s airports. Of the 70 times they tried to smuggle fake guns and bombs past Transportation...
From: The Economist | Friday, July 31, 2015
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AMERICAN and British central bankers face a similar tough choice. On both sides of the Atlantic, the economy is growing moderately, and unemployment is closing in on 5%­­. As a result, wage growth is picking up. But inflation remains low: 0.2% in America...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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P.W. SINGER and August Cole discuss their new thriller, in which America's navy fights back against a Chinese invasion of Hawaii with the support of hackers, venture capitalists and an eccentric Australian billionaireContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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WHEN news broke of a deal between Turkey and America over Syria last weekend, it was welcomed as a game-changer. But it has speedily become clear that the agreement is riddled with ambiguity and divergent agendas. That should not come as a surprise:...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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Reach for the sky WERE it built to its original design, the Burj Khalifa would have just 90 floors, says Muhammad Alabbar, the chairman of Emaar Properties, which developed the skyscraper. But when Mr Alabbar presented his plans to Sheikh Muhammad bin...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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THREE years ago Nadia Tolokonnikova donned a balaclava and, with two partners in the Pussy Riot band, cavorted near the altar of Moscow’s biggest cathedral, screeching out a “punk prayer” in protest against the imminent re-election of Vladimir...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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GÜNTER GRASS, an enthusiast for the centre-left ideas of Willy Brandt, chronicled the slow post-war rise of social democracy in an elegant memoir called “From the Diary of a Snail”. The creature struck the writer as an apt metaphor for that school...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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“HOW does a bastard, orphan, son of a whore and a Scotsman, dropped in the middle of a forgotten spot in the Caribbean, by providence impoverished in squalor, grow up to be a hero and a scholar?” So begins the opening rap in “Hamilton”, a hip-hop...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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Good while it lasts AFTER four and a half years that have ravaged the country and sucked in ever more combatants—the latest being Turkey—Syria’s ghastly civil war seems as intractable as ever. But like the twisting narrative of an endless television...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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A fruitful endeavour TOSS the fruit of the oil palm in your hand—a reddish-orange lozenge not much bigger than a chestnut—and it is difficult to imagine all the trouble it has caused. At Carey Island, an enormous plantation run by Sime Darby, a Malaysian...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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FOR Rilli Willow, as for many others in Berlin this week, a “circle is closing”. Her great-aunt Dora was once a Jewish opera singer in Berlin. Deported at 33 to Auschwitz, Dora was forced to sing for its guards until she perished. Now Rilli, 32 and...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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MAYORS need watching, as any national leader knows. Some are terrible liabilities, like the crack-loving Marion Barry who ran Washington, DC, until 1999. Others, like Jacques Chirac, who managed Paris until 1995, and Boris Johnson, looking after London...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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AS AN adornment to the many academic studies of income inequality, Lexington is compiling a miscellany of spurious anecdotes about the very rich. Entries should, ideally, sound plausible but turn to dust after a few phone calls. Recent additions to the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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EVEN ardent advocates of a woman’s right to an abortion may grow queasy from watching a series of undercover videos of meetings with representatives from Planned Parenthood, a national group that offers reproductive-health services, including abortions....
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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IT WAS a litany of gratitude to put an Oscar-winner to shame. In his last state-of-the-nation address to the Philippine Congress on July 27th, President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino thanked God, his late parents and political allies, along with his social...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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For galoshes, size does matter IT USED to be that condoms could be found in China only during business hours, at government family-planning clinics, on production of a marriage certificate. In recent years they have become far more readily available—in...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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MORE than a year after America and its allies set out to punish the Kremlin for backing rebels in Ukraine and annexing Crimea, Russia is finding new friends and dealing with the West from a position of growing strength. At any rate, that is the message...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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IN A darkened room at the edge of downtown Washington, DC, electronic music pulses over the speakers as a crowd of mostly sweaty young women bop up and down. Candles burn at the front and inspirational slogans cover the walls. Sadly, this is not a drug-fuelled...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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Pollard, collared BEFORE Edward Snowden and Chelsea Manning brought data theft into the digital age, there was Jonathan Pollard. Mr Pollard was a naval intelligence analyst who in 1987 was convicted of supplying vast quantities of secret information...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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IN 2013 the American Society of Civil Engineers released its four-yearly report card on the state of the nation's infrastructure. It estimated that $3.6 billion of investments were needed across the country, and gave the roads an abysmal D grade for...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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THIS week we publish The World If, a companion supplement to our annual compilation of predictions for the year ahead: The World In. The difference is that instead of offering forecasts it explores scenarios: we suggest what could happen given certain...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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WHEN workers on the London Underground go on strike, Britain’s capital becomes an odd cocktail of the miserable and the carnivalesque. Blitz-era double-decker buses are drafted back into service. Queues for taxis wind around buildings. Hospital emergency...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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HOPES have been raised of a breakthrough in discovering what became of Flight MH370, the Malaysian Airlines plane that disappeared with 239 passengers and crew, seemingly without trace, 17 months ago. A flaperon—a two metre part of a plane’s wing—has...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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ACROSS the highway from the lawns of Nairobi’s Muthaiga Country Club is Mathare, a slum that stretches as far as the eye can see. Although Mathare has virtually no services like paved streets or sanitation, it has a sizeable and growing number of classrooms....
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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The MSCI World, a rich-world stockmarket index, is unchanged compared with this time last year. Despite falling by over a quarter since its peak last month, the Chinese stockmarket is up by over 70% for the year as a whole. Elsewhere, performance has...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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“IT DOESN’T hurt to get more education”, argues Donald Trump, a Republican presidential candidate. But too few Americans are acting on Mr Trump’s insight. Wage inequality has spiralled since the 1980s. In theory, as the returns to education grow,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, July 30, 2015
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ON FRIDAY, the Swiss National Bank (SNB), Switzerland’s central bank, reported second quarter losses of 20 billion Sfr ($20 billion). Following an equally bad first three months of the year, the SNB’s losses so far for 2015 now amount to a whopping...
From: The Economist | Saturday, August 1, 2015
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THIS week's print edition has an array of economics articles that may be of interest. The following have particularly caught our eye:Moldova's economy: Gutted (Finance)Renewable energy: Puffs of hope (Leaders)Turkey's economy: Flightless (Finance)And...
From: The Economist | Friday, July 31, 2015
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