Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

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HEARTBREAK and happiness found their way into Georgia’s Republican strongholds in almost equal measure last night. After winning the party’s nomination for November’s US Senate contest David Perdue (pictured) tepidly thanked his opponent, congressman...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, July 23, 2014
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AFTER last June's Ipsos-MORI issues index where race relations and immigration displaced the economy as the most important issue facing Britain today, it is no surprise to see the same this month. 36% of the public mention it as a concern, a drop of...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, July 23, 2014
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THE wait is over. After taking two weeks to count 135m ballots from 480,000-odd polling stations across the vast archipelago, Indonesia’s Election Commission (the KPU) has at last confirmed that Joko Widodo has been elected president. The commission...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, July 23, 2014
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AID in Africa has controversial reputation. Critics say it is wasteful and does little to assist the poor. Some even argue that it is counter-productive by making recipients dependent on hand-outs. Seldom, though, are western aid agencies accused of...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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VLADIMIR PUTIN told the world that Russia supports an investigation into MH17. But at home he will continue to wage an information war favouring Russia's version of events Continue reading...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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WITH his easy manner, Xavier Mascaró seems almost too mellow to be an artist. As he drives his convertible, top down in the sunshine, to his studio outside Madrid, he chats about being the black sheep of the family. Nine generations of Mascaró men...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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IN ITS Hobby Lobby decision in June, the Supreme Court ruled that some firms could refuse to offer their staff insurance that includes free contraception. This undermined a provision of the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, but had...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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“PASSENGERS are reminded to check their bags before heading to the airport to be sure they are not carrying a gun.” So advised Sari Koshetz, a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) spokeswoman, after passengers were discovered trying to take...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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TAX experts are poring over the full version of the OECD’s new global standard for the cross-border exchange of tax information, known as the Common Reporting Standard, which was released on July 21st. The launch “moves us closer to a world in which...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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The tragic increase in female genital mutilationEVERY ten seconds one girl around the globe has her genitals sliced with a knife. The labia are pulled back and some or all of the clitoris is cut away; sometimes the labia are severed or sewn tight. The...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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STEAMING engines and loose brakes are a worry for any driver; almost equally worrisome is finding a reliable mechanic who won’t take a sharp intake of breath and utter the age-old dictum: “This will cost you”. The caricature of the shady car mechanic...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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REPUBLICANS renewed their assault on the Federal Reserve recently, as they debated legislation to curtail the Fed's freedom to set monetary policy as it sees fit. The legislation would require the Federal Reserve to set interest rates according to a...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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“A MAN is undone by waiting for capital punishment,” Albert Camus wrote, “well before he dies.” On July 16th a federal judge in California, Cormac Carney, ruled in Jones v Chappell that the machinery of death in the Golden State is so plagued...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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MAURICE Sendak said that "there's so much more to a book than just the reading," and in the burgeoning economy of e-books, there's so much more to a service than just the number of titles. Amazon entered the marketplace last week, with many describing...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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FRANCE’S leaders are increasingly worried about the apparent rise of anti-Semitism in their country. Yesterday afternoon François Hollande, the president, called an urgent meeting of Jewish, Muslim, Christian and Buddhist leaders to discuss the outbreak...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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FOR many, the news that Yoo Byung-eun, a South Korean billionaire, has been found dead is a bitter disappointment. He had been the prime suspect in a ferry tragedy in which 304 passengers, many of them children, drowned on April 16th (ten bodies are...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 22, 2014
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GROWTH and its potential in America, pressure to act on the Bank of England and the ECB and a fresh round of debate over corporate taxationContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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THIS summer sees the launch of a massive programme of public art in Britain, in which 25 works will be displayed on 30,000 advertising hoardings and digital displays around the country. The project is called Art Everywhere, and the idea according to...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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LESS than two weeks ago, when they were contenders to win the World Cup, the Dutch dressed up in orange, painted their faces red-white-blue and euphorically waved their flags. On July 17th, as details of the crash of the Malaysia Airlines flight 17 that...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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PHILIP CLARKE did not sit still during his three years as boss of Tesco, the world’s second-largest retailer by sales. After taking over from Terry Leahy as chief executive, he pulled out of an ill-advised venture into America and scaled back Tesco’s...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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WANTED—chief executive to transform bureaucratic organization prone to political buffeting and infighting. Tenure of previous incumbent: less than three years. The most significant shift of the reshuffle on July 16th was not the reorganisation of premier-league...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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EVERYONE can reel off negative national stereotypes when it comes to tourists. Germans? Humourless and demanding. Americans? Loud with garish shorts. Chinese? Rude. Canadians? Actually Canadians are all quite nice. And the Brits? Drunken, violent louts.Stereotyping...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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The lucrative prize pools for video-game competitionsTHE final battle of "The International", a tournament for the video game Defense of the Ancient 2 (Dota 2), will be fought on July 21st. With a prize pool of $10.9m, the sum is a record for such...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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THE sorts of cities into which Hauser & Wirth, one of the world’s most successful commercial art galleries, might be expected to expand are Hong Kong, Beijing, São Paulo and others in the emerging markets. But instead it is the world of farmers'...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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SO THE British government is setting up an advice service for retirees with a pension pot, now that they no longer need to buy an annuity with the money. The advice, which will be paid for by a levy on the finance industry, will be from independent providers...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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TYLER COWEN has written a column on inequality, in which he notes that while inequality is rising within many economies it is falling globally. That is true, though it is worth pointing out that among the economies within which inequality is rising are...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 21, 2014
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