Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
Finding flaws in Flamanville PLANS for rescuing France’s ailing nuclear engineer, Areva, became a little clearer this week when the new boss of Electricité de France (EDF), Jean-Bernard Lévy, described on May 19th the role that the utility was prepared...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
IN A LEADER this week we argue that the West should treat Ukraine like it treated Poland in the early 1990s. Poland has had bucketloads of aid and economic assistance thrown at it since the 1990s, its economy booming as a result. Ukraine, on the other...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
“THE history of the development of the human society is a history of discovering and exploiting energy.” With those grand words did Li Hejun (pictured), one of China’s wealthiest billionaires, inaugurate a giant exhibition centre devoted to clean...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames.PALMYRA, an ancient oasis city and one-time capital of a short-lived empire, has been razed before. In the third century, the Roman emperor Aurelian punished its rebelling...
From: The Economist | Friday, May 22, 2015
smile
frown
IT IS almost impossible to change people's opinions on divisive political issues by arguing with them. This is rather depressing for opinion journalists and others in the advocacy business, but the social-science research is fairly conclusive. There...
From: The Economist | Friday, May 22, 2015
smile
frown
WITH its five conservative, Catholic men, three liberal women and Justice Breyer, today's Supreme Court seems predictably ideological. The retirements of Sandra Day O'Connor, David Souter and John Paul Stevens over the past decade—three justices...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
THIS week's print edition has an array of economics articles that may be of interest. The following have particularly caught our eye:Why America's approach to punishing financial crime is muddled, lenient and self-defeating (Leaders)Why the West should...
From: The Economist | Friday, May 22, 2015
smile
frown
FEW museumgoers forget an artwork by Tino Sehgal. It is not just that his pieces erupt unexpectedly in often empty galleries, with individuals and groups dancing and singing and engaging visitors in provocative dialogues. The live situations that Mr...
From: The Economist | Friday, May 22, 2015
smile
frown
Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames.INDIA is a continent masquerading as a country. Within a generation it will become the most populous country on earth: its population is likely to peak at some 1.6 billion...
From: The Economist | Friday, May 22, 2015
smile
frown
IT IS one thing to possess the ability to interfere with the avionic systems onboard an aircraft. It is quite another to announce to the world the intention of practicing such capabilities. But it takes a galactic level of stupidity, hubris or, perhaps,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
ANOTHER linguistically interesting holiday is upon us: Pentecost, from the Greek for the “50th [day]” since Easter. The other Germanic languages tend to call it something like the German Pfingsten, which is just pentekoste plus a thousand years of...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
Let’s hear it roar THE SCREAMS BEGIN most mornings at 9am. Elderly men and women in a Delhi park hold their arms in the air and shriek, then laugh. After years of observing the pensioners from his office window, your correspondent one day joins them....
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
DUBBED “Mad Maria”, the Madeira-Mamoré railway was said, with only some exaggeration, to have cost a life for every sleeper laid. Built for booming rubber exports, the 367km (228-mile) line from Porto Velho in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon to...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
In need of private input A WHIRL OF activity fills the dimly lit carriage. Passengers jostle and rip open paper bags containing linen for their bunks. It is a relief to leave the stench of Bangalore station, where tracks double as latrines. The Hospet...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
The brigadier and the man from Whim IN THE half century since Guyana won independence from Britain, it has switched governing parties only twice. The second time was on May 16th, when David Granger, a former chief of the country’s tiny army, was sworn...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
SECRET baptisms, lost lovers, jealousy and martyrdom: “Poliuto” does not lack for drama. But despite such temptations, Gaetano Donizetti's opera is rarely performed, and indeed it has never been staged in Britain. That will change, though, on May...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
No more dodgy cooking-gas deals “THE BEST THING about India is we don’t have to replace anything,” says Sachin Bansal. He founded Flipkart, an online marketplace, with $8,000 in 2007. When it lists later this year, India’s answer to Amazon is...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
Cut off THE Rohingyas have often been called the most persecuted people in the world—with good reason. Most have lived in Rakhine state in western Myanmar for generations, yet have always been denied citizenship by the government. Indeed, they are...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
THE scene was familiar: regulators meting out vast penalties to banks, scathing statements about gross misconduct, yet no individuals charged with any crimes and some confusion as to what exactly the banks were admitting to and what effect that would...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
INDIA IS A continent masquerading as a country. Like America, it is a federation that divides power between the centre in Delhi and 31 states with their own elected assemblies and rulers (five more “union” territories are run from the centre). It...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
IN THE run-up to the British election this month, it was taken for granted that politics was entering an age of alliances. No party would win a majority; that much seemed certain. The question was whether the Conservatives or Labour could put together...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
INDIANS ONCE KNEW how to build great cities. Take the ruins of Hampi (pictured), a site in southern India that rivals Angkor Wat in magnificence but gets only 47,000 foreign visitors a year, compared with the 2.3m who flock to the Cambodian attraction....
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
KINMEN, a cluster of tiny islands two kilometres (just over a mile) off the coast of China’s Fujian Province, bears the scars of many a past battle. Chiang Kai-shek used the archipelago for his rearguard after Mao Zedong’s forces had driven his Kuomintang...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
PART OF THE secret of China’s success in the past four decades or so has been the clever use of its diaspora. Chinese manufacturers in Hong Kong who had long supplied American partners moved to the mainland and set up factories. Chinese nationals who...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
Fifty leaders and counting “FOREIGN POLICY IS fun, to an extent it is theatre,” says Shivshankar Menon, who was India’s national security adviser until last year. He recalls a prime minister who so enjoyed talking about foreign policy that he let...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
NARENDRA MODI would like to believe he has broken the mould as India’s leader. He is personally powerful and keener on a big international role for his country than his predecessors were. As he says, “there are huge global expectations for India.”...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
FOR nearly three months a small green fishing boat has chugged around South-East Asia’s vast blue waters, packed with people no one wants. At first the 300 or so refugees on board—most of them Rohingyas, a Muslim ethnic-minority persecuted in Myanmar—were guided...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
TWO big obstacles face the reform-minded Italian government, headed by Matteo Renzi: a mistrust of competition and selection, and a fear of change that may worsen existing problems, like nepotism. Both impulses are threatening a plan to upgrade Italian...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
YOU WOULDN’T KNOW by looking at scruffy Vadnagar that it has a famous son. Tourists occasionally visit the walled part of the Gujarati town for its ornate wooden doors and balconies. A pair of stone gateways hints at a history stretching over two millennia....
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
Prepared for leadership UNDER A MANGO tree in Varanasi two dozen men parade in white shirts, black caps and khaki shorts, a uniform modelled on Baden-Powell’s Scouts. They salute a flag, completing a shakha, a morning meeting of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
AT JUSARANG Community Church, in southern Seoul, a pastor maintains a “baby box” where mothers can leave unwanted infants (pictured above). Its intake is sadly rising. Since revisions were made to South Korea’s adoption law in 2012, the number...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
ON MAY 22nd Ireland could become the first country in the world to legalise same-sex marriage by popular vote. If Irish voters pass the referendum measure, the country will join another 18 that grant full marriage equality. This would be a remarkably...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
WITH cash-strapped governments around the world looking for ways to cut welfare bills and reduce deficits, it might seem an odd time to consider a generous new universal benefit. Yet the basic income—a guaranteed government payment to all citizens,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
IT IS one of those intractable problems. Cities strive to become nicer places in which to live. Yet the more they succeed the less interesting they become. This thought struck Gulliver on a recent trip to New York. Twenty years ago Manhattan felt full...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
A report by the OECD, a club of rich countries, produced further evidence on the widening gap between rich and poor. In the 1980s the richest 10% of the population of OECD countries earned seven times more than the poorest decile. Today they earn ten...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
A YEAR ago Narendra Modi came to office promising to bring India “good times”, by which he meant jobs, prosperity and international renown. His progress has been frustratingly slow. The problem is hardly a lack of opportunity. Voters gave his Bharatiya...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown
THE scene was familiar: regulators meting out vast penalties to banks, scathing statements about gross misconduct, yet no individuals charged with any crimes and some confusion as to what exactly the banks were admitting to and what effect that would...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 21, 2015
smile
frown