Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
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  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
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IN 1978 the Supreme Court, in the Bakke case, struck down racial quotas in higher education. Summing up, Justice Lewis Powell called the undergraduate admissions policy at Harvard University an “illuminating example” of a better approach. The elite...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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WHEN in a hole, fire someone. That's the Washington way. Bigwigs and advisers alike must be wondering who will be next after Monday’s very public sacking of Chuck Hagel, the defence secretary. President Barack Obama’s national security team has...
From: The Economist | Monday, November 24, 2014
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ACCORDING to new data released today, America's economy grew at a 3.9% annual pace in the third quarter of this year. That was an upward revision from the advance estimate, of 3.5%. It came on the heels of a second quarter in which real output expanded...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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HOW surprised should we be that a grand jury in Missouri failed to indict a police officer for killing an unarmed black man? In one sense, very surprised: it is very rare for grand juries to fail to indict a suspect when the state is doing its best to...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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“IT IS not as bad as they say,” insisted Kelly. At the Marley’s Bar & Grill, a place she runs with her husband Martin on South Florissant Road in Ferguson, Missouri, Kelly was quick to claim that media reports had overstated the problems of...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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AROUND the world certain cities have sadly become synonymous with war, brutality and lawlessness. For the business traveller, particularly the Western business traveller, Baghdad surely ranks among the most feared of assignments. Tripoli looks to be...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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 SUCCESSIVE governments have stood by as America became home to more than 11m unauthorised residents. If they were all in a single state it would be America's eighth-largest by population, just behind Ohio. Many of those foreigners arrived years ago,...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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TWO years ago Matthew Thomas was settling into his eighth year teaching at a high school in New York City. He had nearly finished writing a 640-page, loosely autobiographical, debut novel about an Irish-American family’s rise into the middle class...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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THANKS to a number of leaks, it was no surprise when Robert McCulloch announced that a grand jury did not indict Darren Wilson, the white police officer who shot Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, last August in Ferguson, Missouri. The decision...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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DOVEISH action and words from central banks in China and Europe, Russia's economy and more trouble for Google in EuropeContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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THE footage is grainy, poorly lit and almost indecipherable. Shot at the Vista Hotel in Washington, DC, on January 18th 1990, it shows a man and a woman, both standing in profile. The woman is active and talkative, the man stays in one place, leaning...
From: The Economist | Monday, November 24, 2014
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WINTER weather wreaks all sorts of havoc on business travellers. But perhaps the worst consequence of snowshowers, hailstorms and outright blizzards are the flight delays. The best way to avoid these is to steer clear of airports that are especially...
From: The Economist | Monday, November 24, 2014
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THE British government announced this year that it was offering "freedom" for retirees. No longer did they have to use their pension pot to buy an annuity, a guaranteed income for life. Instead they could take the money as cash and spend it (subject...
From: The Economist | Monday, November 24, 2014
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TWO out of three African countries have substantially increased military spending over the past decade; the continent as a whole raised military expenditure by 65% during that period, after it had stagnated for the previous 15 years. Military spending...
From: The Economist | Monday, November 24, 2014
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BAKING everyday might sound fun, particularly at this time of year. But for one recent graduate of the University of Georgia, working in a cake shop for six months quickly turned from sweet to sickly. At her birthday party recently she warned sweet-toothed...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 26, 2014
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EARLIER this month, Jeremy Gutsche spent $28.99 for a 30 megabyte internet access plan for a Singapore Airlines flight. During the flight, he wrote later on his website, he viewed just 155 pages, and uploaded one 4 MB PowerPoint. Yet when he got off...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 26, 2014
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IT IS tempting for economists to couch Europe’s great debates—over immigration, burden-sharing, competitiveness—in technocratic terms. What effect do new arrivals have on the wages of the local population? How can debts be mutualised without giving...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 26, 2014
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OIL ministers from the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) will meet on November 27th in Vienna to discuss what to do about falling oil prices. The cartel, which controls 40% of world oil output, faces a dilemma. Its poorer members,...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 26, 2014
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IN HER latest exhibition, “Walls of Water” at the National Gallery in London, Maggi Hambling explores the impact of waves crashing against the sea wall in Southwold, Suffolk, near where she lives. It's a subject, she says, that remains eternally...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 26, 2014
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