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"FOR your freedom and ours" was a motto used by Polish rebels who fought in various uprisings against the Russian and Austro-Hungarian empires between 1830 and 1849, both in Poland and in Hungary and Italy. Their intent was to build a coalition of nationalist...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Spot the gilded facade SPEND a few days in Yangon, and you can almost believe you are in a country with a functioning financial sector. ATMs, completely absent just a few years ago, now dot the city. Credit cards are increasingly (though still not widely)...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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BARACK OBAMA is unloved by business. And as the mid-term elections approach and voters ponder whether to hand the Senate to his Republican opponents, that could make a difference. Business owners give Mr Obama lower than average approval ratings. Corporate...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Euro-zone debts are looking increasingly unsustainableLAST week there was turmoil in financial markets. Investors started to worry about whether struggling euro-zone economies would be able to pay back their debt. Yields on Greece’s sovereign bonds...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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EARLIER this year it all looked so rosy. In April, just two years after Greece imposed the biggest sovereign-debt restructuring in history on its private creditors, it raised €3 billion ($4.2 billion at the time) in five-year bonds at a yield of less...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Truth had consequences IN A very different age and time, back in 1973, Ben Bradlee—the Washington Post editor whose newspaper uncovered the Watergate scandal, toppled President Richard Nixon and went to the Supreme Court to defend its right to publish...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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THE SUPREME COURT’S weirdly busy October brings to mind an old Cadillac commercial showing a sedan gliding silently down the highway, driver calm and confident in a hermetic, leather-appointed cabin, while the announcer intones, “quietly doing things...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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How much city-dwellers overpay for housing Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames.EVERY urbanite grumbles about the price of housing. But some have more cause to complain than others. The price that people...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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IS BARACK Obama a narcissist? Charles Krauthammer thinks so, and he should know. The conservative American pundit is a psychiatrist by training, and with his Vulcan-like facial features, gravelly voice and articulate defence of conservative positions,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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AMERICA is a deeply divided country. Many countries are. But as Juan Linz, a political scientist, noted in a seminal study on presidential democracy, America's constitution ensures both Congress and the president have some claim to democratic legitimacy....
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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BUSINESS barons and financiers are not known for taking to the streets. Yet on October 22nd thousands turned out in the centre of São Paulo in support of Aécio Neves, the centre-right challenger to President Dilma Rousseff, of the left-wing Workers’...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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DAYS before he seeks re-election to Congress for an eighth time, Representative Mike Capuano of Massachusetts has yet to order a single bumper sticker or “I Like Mike” lawn sign. That is not as risky as it might sound. In his district, a Democratic...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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MCDONALD’S is by no means the most accommodating of fast-food chains to people with special dietary requirements. Many of its restaurants in America and Britain do not even serve a meat-free burger for vegetarians. But in a week-long trial ending on...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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For him it’s a marathon SENTENCING Oscar Pistorius to five years’ imprisonment for manslaughter, Judge Thokozile Masipa struggled to achieve the near-impossible: appeasing both sides in the long, heart-rending trial. The mother of Reeva Steenkamp,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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THE collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 had many causes. None was as basic as the fall in the price of oil, its main export, by two-thirds in real terms between 1980 and 1986. By the same token, the 14-year rule of Vladimir Putin, heir to what remained,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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WHEN David Cameron declared his intention last year to hold a referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union, this newspaper gave a cautious cheer. Although we felt there was a risk the Conservative prime minister was bending too far to the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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FEW people in Africa are fortunate enough to have savings to fall back on in their old age. Having enrolled in a voluntary state-run pension scheme, Stephen Okikiola was always luckier than most. But it was not until Nigeria obliged firms with five or...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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If your neighbour owns no guns, he’s seeing a different ad IN 1984 Ronald Reagan’s campaign aired a syrupy ad declaring: “It’s Morning Again in America”. It was designed to appeal to as many people as possible, showing pictures of Americans...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Progress, of sortsSIR – Your leader on gay rights celebrated the increasing acceptance and visibility of gay couples (“The gay divide”, October 11th). However, it was wrong to suggest that it is this acceptance of homosexuality in the West that...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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CRICKET “remains the instrument of Caribbean cohesion,” wrote Clive Lloyd, a former West Indies cricket captain, without exaggeration. After the short-lived dream of the West Indies Federation, which united the former British islands of the Caribbean...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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LIKE voters in most democracies, Brazilians pay little heed to foreign policy when choosing leaders. Yet the presidential election on October 26th matters not just to Brazil but to the region. Over the past two decades Latin America’s giant has overcome...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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ONE of the conundrums of the car business is that five smaller Japanese firms continue to prosper alongside three giants, Toyota, Nissan and Honda. In theory, those in the second division—Mazda, Mitsubishi, Suzuki and Subaru—should long ago have...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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THE hope that popular protests against Arab dictators in 2011 would bring justice and democracy has given way to despair, chaos and unimaginable bloodletting. Yet the spirit of the Arab spring survives in the country where it all started: Tunisia. The...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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NOT since Indira Gandhi has a prime minister of India been as dominant as Narendra Modi. His clout comes from the big electoral victory in May of his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) after a remarkably personalised campaign; from a hyperactive prime minister’s...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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THE country where the Arab spring began is poised to complete a momentous transition from dictatorship to democracy when voters go to the polls on October 26th. The vote should seal Tunisia’s title as the sole success of the region’s uprising. But...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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WITH at least 4,500 people dead, public-health authorities in west Africa and worldwide are struggling to contain Ebola. Borders have been closed, air passengers screened, schools suspended. But a promising tool for epidemiologists lies unused: mobile-phone...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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One fan between them RICK SCOTT should probably be in prison, says Darryl Paulson, a political scientist at the University of South Florida. He is also, Mr Paulson contends, Florida’s best choice for governor. So goes politics in America’s fourth-largest...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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THE announcement this week that China’s economy had grown by 7.3% in the third quarter year-on-year was widely seen as marking the country’s “new normal” of slower growth. It was well below the roughly 10% pace China had averaged from 1980 until...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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AT THE height of the dotcom boom, some newspapers and magazines found it hard to print enough pages to absorb all the advertising that firms were willing to buy. Something similar is happening in North Carolina, this year’s most expensive Senate race...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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An ocean away from Africa’s Ebola outbreak, a deep fear of the disease now runs through the Caribbean. The atmosphere recalls the early days of the AIDS epidemic, some 30 years ago. Trinidad and Tobago’s prime minister, Kamla Persad-Bissessar (pictured),...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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IN HER excellent play about Enron, Lucy Prebble portrays the shadow companies set up by the energy giant as raptors, kept in the basement, but endlessly needing to be fed. It is hard not to think of that scene when reading Tesco's interim results today,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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TECHNOLOGY companies from Google to Audi have made remarkable strides in autonomous vehicle technology over the last few years. This progress is the more impressive given the fact that a decade ago technologists considered driving to be a near un-automatable...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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IT WAS a sombre Stephen Harper who addressed Canadians on October 22nd. A lone gunman had fatally shot a young soldier standing guard at the National War Memorial in the capital, Ottawa, and then entered Canada’s parliament building where he was killed....
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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IT IS a pernicious threat, all the more so because, at its onset, it seems almost benign. After two generations of fighting against inflation, why be worried if the victory looks just a bit too complete, if the ancient enemy is so cowed as to no longer...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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THE world economy is not in good shape. The news from America and Britain has been reasonably positive, but Japan’s economy is struggling and China’s growth is now slower than at any time since 2009. Unpredictable dangers abound, particularly from...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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CASINOS have served Cambodia as a rare and dependable cash cow ever since the country first emerged from its decades of civil war, in the late 1990s. On the face of it this year will be no different, with the government expecting to increase its takings,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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THE bet was bound to be a risky one. In July Japan decided to restart talks with North Korea in the hope of securing the return of citizens kidnapped in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The stakes have since been raised. North Korea’s initial report...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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CANADA'S parliament came under attack Wednesday from what appears to be a lone gunman, who launched two separate attacks within blocks of each other and then was killed. Although the main parliamentary building was full of MPs for weekly caucus meetings,...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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THIS morning, at the train station on the way to work, Gulliver did not buy a train ticket before boarding the train. Nor did he use a pre-paid travel card or show a season ticket. Like many others on the network, I merely touched my debit card on to...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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 IN 1990 Mario Vargas Llosa, the Peruvian novelist, scandalized Mexico by describing the country as “the perfect dictatorship”. He was referring to the decades of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) that, in keeping with its Orwellian...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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MUCH has been made of the fun that "Birdman, or the Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance" pokes at artists, egos and the entertainment business. You are less likely to hear that part of what makes this film so intriguing is how closely it resembles another...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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SARAH THORNTON discusses her new book in which she dives into the lives of 33 prominent artists including Ai Weiwei, Maurizio Cattelan, Jeff Koons and Damien HirstContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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LEYLA YUNUS did not win the European Parliament's Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought this year—it went to Denis Mukwege, a Congolese gynecologist who has battled sexual violence against women—but she was one of the three finalists. That gives...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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The coldest time of year has not always been the most lethalWINTER is the deadliest season. That is common knowledge. But it was not always so—at least, not for nobles, the group for whom records are most complete. In a working paper for the European...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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WHATEVER happened to emerging markets? They were supposed to bail the developed economies out of the financial crisis. And they were also supposed to provide an attractive home for growth-seeking international investors seeking to escape the moribund,...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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IT WAS as though the Cold War had never ended. A hazy shape spotted by island residents in the southern Stockholm archipelago on October 17 quickly prompted suspicions of an incursion by a Russian submarine. The Swedish military leapt into action, establishing...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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WHEN doing business in today's globalised world, we are forever being advised to empathise with others' cultural sensitivities. That is clearly a sound thing, but it can put your head in a spin. Gulliver came across this map, created by Radical Cartography,...
From: The Economist | Friday, October 24, 2014
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THE resignation on October 23rd of Ángel Aguirre (pictured), governor of the south-western state of Guerrero, where 43 students have been missing for almost a month, has come too late to assuage the anger of Mexicans clamouring for a decisive response...
From: The Economist | Friday, October 24, 2014
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IT BEGAN with a bleeding nose and ended with a punch in the face. Yesterday's meeting of European Union heads of government in Brussels started inauspiciously, when the Cypriot president was taken to hospital after a series of nosebleeds; caused, said...
From: The Economist | Friday, October 24, 2014
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