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SOME OF THE finest infrastructure to be found between Singapore and Dubai lies in the south of Sri Lanka, close to the crashing waves of the Indian Ocean. Broad highways connect a deep-sea harbour to a silvery, angular convention centre and, further...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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THE duty of large corporations is “not limited to ‘not being evil’”, argues People’s Daily, the bombastic mouthpiece of China’s Communist Party. The newspaper desires greater social responsibility at China’s internet-search firms. It apparently...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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YESTERDAY Theo Bertram, an adviser in Downing Street under New Labour, blogged on the art of spinning local-election results. He pointed to the party’s grim showing in 2007, when it lost 505 seats and the opposition Conservatives gained 911, as proof...
From: The Economist | Friday, May 6, 2016
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FIG LEAVES are often draped over controversial laws coming out of the Republican-dominated legislature in Texas. But when a judge takes a closer look, the reality of the legislation tends to be laid bare fairly quickly. In March, Texas's solicitor general...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames.POLITICAL connections have always greased the wheels of commerce. But for the past 20 years, from Malaysia to Mexico, crony capitalists—individuals who earn their riches...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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HOW fast are incomes growing? The answer swings elections; Ronald Reagan, on his way to victory in 1980, told voters to ask themselves if they were better off than they were four years earlier. It also shifts the political spectrum. Paltry wage growth...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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THE HEAD OFFICE of Sheyang Rural Commercial Bank is a reassuringly solid building. Its grey stone façade and arched doorways convey a feeling of prosperity, a splash of high finance in this small county town in eastern China where grain fields nip at...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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The mayor, probed “I NEED your prayers,” said Bill de Blasio, New York City’s mayor, to the pastor before addressing a congregation in Queens. He did not say why, but it may be because his administration is the subject of multiple investigations...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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JUST BEYOND CHARLIE CHEN’S perch, Shanghai looks every inch the global financial centre it aspires to be. Skyscrapers shimmer in the spring light, capped by the names of some of the world’s biggest banks and insurers. On the pavement below, smartly...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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“THE lesser of two evils is not an option. I won’t vote for evil.” So says Julie Edwards, a volunteer for the insurgent presidential campaign of Senator Bernie Sanders, explaining why she will spurn both main party candidates if—as looks almost...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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Room for a few more HOTEL companies check out well just now. On May 3rd Hyatt became the latest chain to report sunny results—profits were up by 55% over the same quarter in 2015. In America RevPAR (revenue divided by rooms available in a given period)...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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IN A hut on stilts on the island of Borneo, a dozen skulls hang in a cage. They are those of long-dead victims of the Dayaks—indigenous tribes whose members make up the majority in Sarawak, a sprawling Malaysian state. Once thought to harbour protective...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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ANOTHER Satoshi has bitten the dust. On May 2nd Craig Wright, an Australian entrepreneur, published on his blog what he claimed was proof that he is Satoshi Nakamoto, the mysterious creator of bitcoin, a cryptocurrency. Within 90 minutes the post had...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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IT HAS been a grim decade for investors in international oil firms—among them, many of the world’s biggest pension funds. Even before oil prices started to fall in 2014, the supermajors threw money away on grandiose schemes: drilling in the Arctic...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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WHEN Disney opens its newest theme park in Shanghai next month, one of the first sights to greet visitors will be the Enchanted Storybook Castle. Its gold finials and blue spires will tower 60 metres above the centre of the park, making the castle the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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THE VIDEO PANS from the empty lot outside the factory to the interior, where metal parts lie in a heap, detritus of a bankrupt steel company. Playing cards litter the ground. Over the desolate scene, soft piano music plays and a narrator describes the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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A comfortable Bentley OSCAR WILDE’S quip doesn’t cover it. For not one, nor two, but three of a state’s highest officials to be embroiled in separate scandals goes beyond misfortune and carelessness and begins to look like a trend. And, in a way,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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AT THE TIME, the “Five-Year Plan for a New Economy” seemed a courageous fresh start. The government vowed to wind down controls on interest rates, allow companies to borrow abroad, open domestic markets to foreign investors and sell its holdings...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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THE forecasts are clear: by 2050 the number of people aged over 80 will have doubled in OECD countries, and their share of the population will rise from 3.9% to 9.1%. Around half will probably need help with daily tasks—particularly those with enduring...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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IF YOU SCOUR the annual reports of China’s biggest banks, you will find hardly a mention of the Communist Party. There are passing references to the “Party Discipline Office” in descriptions of the banks’ internal structures, and the biographies...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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Character witness“Lucifer in the flesh...I have never worked with a more miserable son of a bitch in my life.”Former Speaker of the House, John Boehner on Ted Cruz. The Stanford Daily Touch the stars“They just wanted to get in with Donald.”Rival...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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And that’s just what they’ll do ON MAY 14th Stockholm hosts the final of the Eurovision song contest: a camp, televised crooning event that draws nearly 200m television viewers. Bands competing for votes and fame relish exposure; the host city gets...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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AFTER LI HUI’S husband died in a car accident a decade ago, she received an insurance payout of 800,000 yuan. The money could not begin to make up for his loss, but Ms Li, a soft-spoken pensioner, thought it would at least help tide her over for the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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BERNIE Sanders is out of the running to be the Democratic nominee, but he is still running for president. The once-rising democratic socialist candidate has faltered badly in recent weeks—losing five of the last six states—yet he signalled over the...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, May 3, 2016
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PREPARATIONS are under way in Pyongyang for a rare congress of the Korean Workers' Party which rules North Korea, the first to be held in 36 years, on May 6th. It is something of a coming-out party for Kim Jong Un, its young dictator, who succeeded his...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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FOR Turkey’s prime minister, Ahmet Davutoglu, May 4th began on a good note. In the morning the European Commission, the European Union’s executive arm, endorsed a proposal to lift visa restrictions for Turks travelling to the bloc’s Schengen zone...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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“TRUMP is scary,” says Jim Adkins, the manager of a branch of Olive Garden, a restaurant chain, as he comes out of the banquet hall of the St Peter & Paul Macedonian Church, where he has just cast his vote for Hillary Clinton. Mr Adkins usually...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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IT IS OFTEN said that London is becoming a city just for the rich, particularly as far as housing is concerned. This sweeping statement means different things to different people, and it is actually quite hard to marshal evidence showing that this is...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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WHEREVER the eye falls in Donald Trump’s Manhattan office, on the 26th floor of Trump Tower, there is Trump. Images of the tycoon glower from walls plastered with covers of Playboy, GQ, Newsweek and more. Piles of campaign literature—“Trump—Make...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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DURING its 160-year history, the Republican Party has abolished slavery, provided the votes in Congress to pass the Civil Rights Act and helped bring the cold war to a close. The next six months will not be so glorious. After Indiana’s primary, it...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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PAUL MCCARTNEY is pure music, the first singer and multi-instrumentalist with sex appeal who breathed melody. He lived in our speakers and on our screens, and wrote the soundtrack of much of the 20th century. When John Lennon saw him in his big white...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 5, 2016
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PUNDITS have spent months mocking the Republican presidential ambitions of Governor John Kasich of Ohio, who finally dropped out on May 4th, clearing the field for Donald Trump. As other, more successful rivals dropped by the wayside, leaving the governor...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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THEY don’t drink, they don’t get tired and they don’t go on strike. To hospital managers, the idea of robots operating on patients without human intervention is an attractive one. To patients, though, the crucial question is, “are they better...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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IT FINALLY happened. John Kasich, the last challenger to Donald Trump for the Republican presidential nomination after Ted Cruz called it quits last night, will end his campaign today (May 4th), according to multiple news outlets.While he has long been...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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HANDS triangled in prayer, then a sideways karate chop. Those two gestures, often performed in quick succession, were the signature gesticulations of Ted Cruz’s stump speeches during his now-abandoned bid for the Republican nomination. They also embody...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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The script seems familiar THE tagline of the film “My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2”, which was released in March, is “People change. Greeks don’t.” Whether any euro-zone finance ministers have seen the film, let alone detected any resemblance...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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A national treasure SOMETIMES even a revolutionary government can seem out of touch. The African National Congress (ANC), which has ruled South Africa since 1994, feels this problem acutely. In the bad old days of apartheid its leaders were unjustly...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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THE top of the carrot, blackened by frost, poked just above the frozen ground. As soon as he saw it, Harry Wu dropped to his knees and scraped for it until his fingers bled. After 18 months in one of China’s laogai (“re-education through labour”)...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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OUTFLANKED on the populist right by Donald Trump, Ted Cruz threw in the towel in the Republican presidential-nomination race on May 3rd following his resounding defeat in the Indiana primary. Mr Cruz had been the first candidate of either party to announce...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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WHEN historians come to write about the 2016 Presidential election, one moment may stand as emblematic of the Republican primary campaign. It occurred on May 2, when Ted Cruz confronted a Trump protester in Indiana. Mr Cruz, a debating champion who has...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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TWO OF Brazil’s most prominent pop musicians, Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil, both from Bahia and both 73 years old, will perform on May 4th at the Barbican Centre. They are regular performers across the world, seem not to feel their age and wear...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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“TRUMP is scary,” says Jim Adkins, the manager of a branch of Olive Garden, a restaurant chain, as he is coming out of the banquet hall of the St Peter & Paul Macedonian Church, where he just cast his vote for Hillary Clinton. Mr Adkins usually...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 4, 2016
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CRAIG WRIGHT claims to have founded the cryptocurrency. Our technology and business affairs editors debate whether his 'proofs' add up. Plus China's looming debt crisis - and the economics of Game of ThronesContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, May 3, 2016
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Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames.IN 2013 Sam Allardyce, then the manager of West Ham football club, came up with a no-nonsense explanation for footballing success. “Where you actually finish in the...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, May 3, 2016
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A pattern of repression IT WAS prayer time at the Northern Mosque in Khasavyurt, a town in western Dagestan, when troops in black balaclavas arrived one day in February. “They said: ‘This mosque is closing—turn off the lights and hand over the...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, May 3, 2016
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WORKS of art are often viewed through the eyes of the artist that created them: that van Gogh’s vibrant “Sunflowers” were the product of happy times in Arles, or that Picasso’s “Le Rêve” and “Nude, Green Leaves, and Bust” were clues...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, May 3, 2016
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