Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
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You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
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Gabriel García Márquez, Colombian novelist, died on March 17th aged 87AS HE later told it, Gabriel García Márquez, who has died at his home in Mexico City, made the most important decision of his life as a writer at the age of 22 when he joined his...
From: The Economist | Friday, April 18, 2014
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Greece’s debt woes are easing...
From: The Economist | Friday, April 18, 2014
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OUR Americas view blog offers a tribute to Gabriel García Márquez, the magnificent Colombian novelist who died on March 17th aged 87.
From: The Economist | Friday, April 18, 2014
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LIKE King Kong before it, the new Ford Mustang Convertible had to be prized from the top of the Empire State Building. It didn't quite require a squadron of old Air Force biplanes, but bringing the car down to terra firma was no easy task. Nor was taking...
From: The Economist | Friday, April 18, 2014
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HOPES that an accord struck on April 17th in Geneva between Ukraine, Russia, America and the European Union would lead to a swift resolution of the Ukrainian crisis have been swiftly dashed. Denis Pushilin, the chairman of the self-proclaimed People’s...
From: The Economist | Friday, April 18, 2014
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APRIL is National Poetry Month in the United States. Alongside all the readings, festivals and workshops, one much-loved offshoot is Cowboy Poetry Week, now in its 30th year, which takes place from the 20th to the 26th. (Lots of events are listed here.)Cowboy...
From: The Economist | Friday, April 18, 2014
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WINSTON CHURCHILL referred to clinical depression as “the black dog”. Approximately 30% of those diagnosed with the condition fail to respond sufficiently to medication or psychological counselling. But new help may be at hand.Danish scientists are...
From: The Economist | Friday, April 18, 2014
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ODDLY, for a democratic country in the midst of an election, India this week held its sixth “strategic dialogue” with China. The talks in Beijing, between the two countries’ most senior diplomats, at least show how keen their foreign ministries...
From: The Economist | Friday, April 18, 2014
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ONE OF the biggest stories in astronomy over the past two decades has been the promotion of exoplanets—planets orbiting stars other than the Sun—from science fiction to reality. Astronomers, and anyone with even the faintest grasp of statistics,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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SPEND enough time in Argentina and you learn to look out for them—the motorcycles roving around with two males aboard. Often their intentions are completely innocent. Other times they’re not.Motochorros, or motorcycle bandits, normally operate in...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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CHRISTIANITY is important to David Cameron: that is the clear message coming from Downing Street this morning. In a piece for the Church Times, the prime minister has announced that he wants Britain to be "more confident about our status as a Christian...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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IN THE developed world, insurance is an every day part of life. In rich countries such as Britain, well over 80% of households hold at least one policy, according to the Association of British Insurers, an industry group. Insurance Europe, a lobbying...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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THE light can turn in the blink of an eye in Iceland. Across the bay from Arnarholl, a hill that stands above Reykjavik’s low-lying buildings, a volcanic ridge rises from the sea. Called Esja, its snowy flanks reflect the sun in brilliant white, then...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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What believers save for their sufferingLENT ends today, Holy Thursday. After 40 days of fasting and reflecting, the world's 1.2 billion Catholics can prepare for Easter—and finally sink their teeth into a chocolate bar, light up a cigarette, quaff...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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SEVERE droughts can cost Kenyan farmers their livelihoods. A new insurance scheme aims to protect them...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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JUST days after Russia raised hackles in the West by annexing Crimea, Igor Sechin, the chief executive of Rosneft, a Russian oil behemoth, took a trip to Asia. He apparently wanted to show the world that his country—perhaps like Anna Karenina after...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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SOME of the surprise in the news that Emmanuel de Merode, chief warden of Virunga Park, had been shot and wounded in eastern Congo was that it had not happened sooner. The Belgian-born head of the spectacular reserve, home—some reckon—to 80% of...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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KARPAL SINGH, who died in a car accident in the early hours of April 17th at the age of 74, was a rarity in the venomous world of Malaysian politics: a man respected by many of his opponents as well as those on his own side.That side, for all of a long...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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REMITTANCES--money sent home by relatives or friends working abroad--are the financial lifeblood of many poor countries. One of the biggest and fastest-growing markets is Africa, which received $32 billion in 2013. That is expected to grow to more than...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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LAST year Thomas Piketty, an economist at the Paris School of Economics and a renowned expert on global inequality, published a book titled "Capital in the Twenty-first Century"—in French. It was released in English on March 10th. We reviewed the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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LATER this month, Washington will hold an unusual lottery: it will select 334 lucky winners of licences to sell recreational marijuana in the Pacific-Northwestern state. If all goes to plan, some of those pot shops will be serving stoners (who in...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 16, 2014
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REGULAR Gulliver readers already are already aware of the reputation of Spirit Airlines, the American low-cost carrier that recently earned the worst possible scores in all six of Consumer Reports' airline-ranking subcategories. Now US PIRG Education...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, April 16, 2014
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THERE is little medical care in the Muslim quarter of Boda, a mining town 200km (125 miles) south-west of Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic (CAR). Fadi Madou was helpless when her six-day-old baby got sick and died. But had she ventured...
From: The Economist | Saturday, April 19, 2014
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BARACK OBAMA heads to Asia, NASA intentionally crashes a space probe into the moon, Shakespeare's Hamlet begins a world tour and archaeologists attempt to resolve a video-gaming mysteryContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Friday, April 18, 2014
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