Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
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What to do:
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  2. Click smileys and frownies
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IN THE 1990s, Britain had the highest teenage-pregnancy rate in the rich world, except America. It is still higher than much of western Europe, but between 2000 and 2014, the rate halved. This partly reflects youngsters staying in education longer, and...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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IF BREXITEERS were going to win the economic arguments in Britain’s EU debate, they would have done so by now. Hence the signs in the past days that they are giving up on the subject. The barrage of big, serious voices—from Barack Obama with his...
From: The Economist | Friday, May 27, 2016
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ON MAY 26th the Associated Press declared that Donald Trump has won 1,238 delegates (counting unpledged), enough to claim the Republican nomination outright. Given the conventional wisdom this election cycle has been that the Republican party is far...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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NORTH KOREA is not bound by any global rules. Its hereditary dictator, Kim Jong Un, imposes forced labour on hundreds of thousands of his people and threatens to drench Seoul, the South’s capital, in “a sea of fire”. Nuclear weapons are central...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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THE “China dream” of the president, Xi Jinping, is of a rejuvenated, rich and strong country that will once again enjoy the respect and fealty in Asia commanded by the empires of old. That last part is not happening: from a recalcitrant young despot,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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“THERE are two possibilities,” predicted Norbert Hofer, who had just become the standard-bearer of Europe’s hard right. It was May 22nd, voting in Austria’s presidential run-off had ceased and the Freedom Party of Austria (FPÖ) candidate seemed...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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TIME was when Hugo Chávez was immensely proud of the new constitution he gave Venezuela in 1999, at the start of his 14 years of rule. He had it printed in a little blue book, and would hand out copies to everyone he met. Now the government of Chávez’s...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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THERE is a scene in “Marseille”, a new television drama billed as a French version of “House of Cards”, in which an ambitious deputy mayor holds a campaign meeting in his office. A photo is selected for election leaflets. New polls provoke cheers....
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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GLASSY-EYED young men stumbling through the streets is not an unusual sight in Newcastle, a city well known for its partying. But in recent years an increasing number have been worse for wear due to “legal highs”—drugs freely available in so-called...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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EVERYTHING Fred Astaire did, Ginger Rogers did backwards and in high heels. Women’s ability to keep up with, if not out-perform, the guys in spite of multiple inconveniences has continued, even in tough times. A slew of recent statistics show that...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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DESPITE its name, the Copa America has never been played north of the Rio Grande before. On June 3rd the international soccer tournament kicks off in Santa Clara, California. Games will take place in ten cities across the country over the next four weeks....
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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A Tatar’s courage never flags ON May 14th Crimea’s indigenous Tatars sat glued to their screens, watching as Jamala, a Ukrainian singer of Tatar descent, won the Eurovision song contest. Jamala’s song “1944” commemorated Stalin’s brutal deportation...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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Paralegal paradise FOR an inkling of how good intentions can go awry, consider Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Passed by Congress in 1990 with the laudable aim of giving the disabled equal access to places of business, it has...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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Don’t chime for me, Argentina WITH its green bell tower and royal coat of arms, the Torre Monumental in Buenos Aires would not look out of place in a British market town. The 60-metre (200-foot) Palladian clock tower was a gift from the city’s British...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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Outvoted IT WAS a long time coming, but all the sweeter for that. On May 23rd, the North Yorkshire County Council gave the go-ahead for a company to start hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”, for shale gas in the village of Kirby Misperton, near...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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IT WAS meant to be a game-changer. When a deal between the European Union and Turkey was struck in March with the aim of limiting the numbers of asylum-seekers coming to Europe, many in Brussels felt cautiously optimistic. Angela Merkel, the German chancellor,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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BRAZILIANS delight in Portuguese words that seem to have no equivalent in other languages. Saudade is yearning for an absent person or a place left behind. Cafuné is the act of running one’s fingers through a lover’s hair. More newsworthy is jeitinho,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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A VISIT to Okehampton—a small town in England’s most rural parliamentary constituency of Central Devon—fulfils a very English yearning for long shadows on cricket grounds and warm beer. It is near to Dartmoor, a wild national park; cream teas are...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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Coimbatore: bobbin and weavin’ MAHATMA GANDHI would not have enjoyed Texfair 2016 in Coimbatore in the southern state of Tamil Nadu. The man hated machines and factories, and promoted Indian independence by urging every household to spin its own cotton...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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BREXITEERS rarely hesitate to profess their love of Europe. Daniel Hannan, a campaigning MEP, stresses that he speaks Spanish and French. Sarah Vine, a journalist married to Michael Gove, the anti-EU justice secretary, points to her husband’s penchant...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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EVERYBODY complains about EU regulation. Myths abound over curvature of cucumbers, how many bananas are allowed in a bunch or whether children may blow up balloons. More legitimate gripes include rules limiting working time to 48 hours a week, enforcing...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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“THE people’s police love the people, the people love the people’s police” is a well-known ditty that officials claim is cherished and accurate. Earlier this month, however, Global Times, a newspaper in Beijing, said that police were struggling...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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VERACRUZ calls itself “four times heroic” to commemorate the occasions in the 19th and 20th centuries on which it resisted foreign assaults. The election campaign taking place in the port city on the Gulf of Mexico, and in the surrounding state of...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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IN 2013, the Romance Writers of America (RWA) estimated that sales of romantic novels amounted to $1.08 billion, and accounted for 13% of adult fiction consumed that year, outselling science fiction, mystery and literary novels. In the five years to...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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THIS time last year, Gulliver made a joke that it must nearly be summer because the French air traffic controllers (ATCs) were on strike. Disruption over Gallic skies is as sure a sign of the changing seasons as a sight of the first returning swallows....
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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I WAS asked yesterday in a radio interview about the Treasury's report, published on Monday, which predicted a sharp recession if Britain votes to leave the EU. My opponent in that debate dismissed my view on the grounds that The Economist had advocated...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 25, 2016
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IN THE hours outside his dreary day job, the utopian socialist Charles Fourier (1772-1837) dreamt of a world where work meant play and where the seas would transform into “a sort of lemonade”. He believed that the passions should be set free: the...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 25, 2016
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A GLIMPSE at how the presidential contest is developing was summed up nicely by a recent headline in the Los Angeles Times: “A Trump-Clinton general election poses a question: Which one does America hate less?” The parties’ putative candidates,...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 25, 2016
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THE angry mobs that now comprise the endless security lines at America’s airports at least have the satisfaction of seeing the first head roll.Earlier this week, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) replaced its security chief after a tumultuous...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, May 25, 2016
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EVER since 1973, when the Supreme Court ruled that women have a limited constitutional right to end their pregnancies, states have imposed restrictions designed to curtail that right or make it more difficult to exercise. Two recent examples illustrate...
From: The Economist | Thursday, May 26, 2016
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THANKS in part to the surge of refugees from Syria, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the UN’s refugee body, now puts the world’s displaced population at a post-war record of 60m, of whom 20m are stranded outside their own...
From: The Economist | Friday, May 27, 2016
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FOR those with insatiable appetites for music, digital streaming seems like a dream come true. Music fans can simply select artists and genres, and then press play. They see what other fans listen to, and consume a seemingly endless supply of tunes....
From: The Economist | Friday, May 27, 2016
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