Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
FIFTY years ago Truman Capote told an interviewer about his grand hopes for a new literary genre. “In Cold Blood”, an account of the 1959 murder of the Clutter family in Kansas, published in 1966, was the product of Capote’s belief “that journalism—reportage—could...
From: The Economist | Friday, February 5, 2016
smile
frown
REINVESTED dividends are the main source of long-term equity returns. And a high divdend yield is a big argument for buying equities. But caveat emptor. When an individual stock has a high yield, that is a sign that the market expects the future dividend...
From: The Economist | Saturday, February 6, 2016
smile
frown
WHO will guard the guardians? When Juvenal, the Roman poet, asked this question twenty centuries ago, he was worried about cheating wives. Today, the query is being posed to the elderly judges of America’s highest court. David Garrow, a law and history...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
EACH night at 7pm, many of China’s television channels beam the state broadcaster’s flagship news programme into Chinese homes: a remorseless half-hour diet of where Xi Jinping went today, how well the economy is doing and (for a few minutes at the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
SINCE the summer of 2014, Europe has been struck with its worst refugee crisis since the second world war. Millions have fled their war-ravaged homelands in search of saftey, causing political turmoil in a continent still recovering from economic disasters....
From: The Economist | Friday, February 5, 2016
smile
frown
JUST two years ago, Heathrow airport in London was the busiest international airport in the world. Last year, it lost its mantle to Dubai. It is still, at least, the busiest in Europe. Though probably not for much longer.According to statistics released...
From: The Economist | Friday, February 5, 2016
smile
frown
CENTRAL banks have become the most powerful economic actors on the planet. In part, this is because governments have been so reluctant, since 2009, to use fiscal policy to stimulate their economies. In part, also, it is because the powers of central...
From: The Economist | Friday, February 5, 2016
smile
frown
REFUGEES are reasonable people in desperate circumstances. Life for many of the 1m-odd asylum-seekers who have fled Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and other war-torn countries for Europe in the past year has become intolerable. Europe is peaceful, rich and...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
IT WAS the fifth face-off between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in a series of Democratic primary debates, but their first one-to-one after their last remaining rival, Maryland’s Governor Martin O’Malley, dropped out on February 1st. And it...
From: The Economist | Friday, February 5, 2016
smile
frown
Labour’s candidate for London’s mayoralty discusses his plans for the capitalTHE two incumbents of London’s mayoralty, created in 2000, have both been colourful and independent-minded individuals. Ken Livingstone was so far from New Labour’s...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
THIS week’s issue of The Economist includes an article that analyses the effectiveness of political advertising during the 2016 Republican presidential primaries. For curious readers, we summarise our method here.The ultimate test of a political campaign...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
VLADIMIR PUTIN, it seems, is impervious to the woes that afflict normal leaders. Four years ago, chants of “Russia without Putin!” echoed through Moscow as thousands took to the streets in reaction to Mr Putin’s choreographed return to the presidency...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
BRYAN CRANSTON, of “Breaking Bad” fame, has earned an Oscar nomination for his performance in “Trumbo”. But even with Mr Cranston’s debonair swagger and bristling moustache, Jay Roach’s lacklustre biopic of Dalton Trumbo, a blacklisted Hollywood...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
IN MANY respects Britain’s mobile-phone market is one of the most successful in the world. About 30 operators compete for business, ensuring that prices are among the lowest for rich countries (see chart). A number of retailers offer an almost infinite...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
IT SEEMS odd for Lee Hsien Loong, Singapore’s prime minister, to tamper with the political system. His country’s style of government has many admirers. Europeans and Americans envy how efficient and clean it is. Authoritarians, not least in China,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
“THE PEOPLE HAVE voted for stability,” proclaimed President Erdogan after his party’s electoral landslide in November. The markets applauded, too. Istanbul’s stock index jumped and the Turkish lira rose against the dollar, both reversing long...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
WHEN THE AK party was founded in 2001, few would have predicted its success. Just four years earlier the army had intervened, for the fourth time since 1960, to depose an elected government, on this occasion an Islamist-led coalition. The Islamists were...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
FIGHTER jets roar overhead, spitting out decoy flares. Helicopters clatter past, bearing commandos rappelling down ropes. Warships lurk in the waters beyond. All week the crowds on the beaches of Visakhapatnam, a coastal Indian city, have been thrilled...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
Time to lighten up “WE HAVE A saying that raki is different in the glass,” says Fatih Okumus, noting that Turkey’s colourless national spirit turns milky white when you add water. It is a surprising way for a top adviser to Diyanet, the government’s...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
The winner came third DONALD TRUMP, flanked by his thoroughbred offspring and wife, showed admirable qualities in Des Moines on February 1st. Acknowledging his defeat by Ted Cruz in the Iowa caucuses, which polls had suggested he would win, the Republican...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
“TO BE, or not to be together, that is the question,” tweeted the president of the European Council, Donald Tusk, on February 2nd as he published a draft plan offering Britain new terms of membership of the European Union. David Cameron, who had...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
AVIATION geeks love Iran Air, but for all the wrong reasons. Decades of sanctions have left Iran's flag-carrier with one of the oldest fleets in the world, featuring museum-vintage aircraft like a 39-year-old Boeing 747SP, the only passenger aircraft...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
IT FELT like the first day of school. On February 1st freshly sworn-in legislators belonging to the National League for Democracy (NLD), the party led by Myanmar’s Nobel peace-prize winning campaigner for democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi (pictured, in pink),...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
IN THEORY it works perfectly. Rather than oblige parents to send their children to the nearest state-run or –funded school, give them a voucher to be spent at a private school of their choice. “The adoption of such arrangements”, argued Milton...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
The new neighbours IN 1997, in his first speech as prime minister, Tony Blair visited the Aylesbury estate in south London and promised to help its “forgotten people”. In 2005 Michael Howard, the leader of the Conservative opposition, went to the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
A haven for Syrian refugees FEW COUNTRIES OCCUPY a geopolitical space of such sensitivity as Turkey, or have played such a range of critical and overlapping international roles. It has been a gateway and a bridge to Europe, most dramatically in recent...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
The plague in The Hague ON JANUARY 28th the Ivory Coast’s Laurent Gbagbo became the first former head of state to go on trial before the International Criminal Court (ICC) at The Hague. Three days later the African Union (AU) resolved, among other...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
Roses are green IF YOU come home to a vase full of roses on Valentine’s Day in Europe there will be a good chance they were picked a few days earlier on the shores of Lake Naivasha in Kenya. The fertile Rift Valley soil, warm days and cool nights make...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
Anyone seen this man? IT SOUNDS like a missing-person notice: 78-year-old man, wheelchair-bound, not seen in public for over two years. But this is a description of Algeria’s president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, whose ill health, including two strokes...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
FIVE years after Western air power helped remove Muammar Qaddafi, the chances of another intervention in Libya are steadily increasing. Islamic State may be retreating in Iraq and under pressure in Syria, but in Libya it is a growing menace. At a meeting...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
Another day, another Kurdish funeral in Diyarbakir “I AM A Turk, honest and hard-working.” So began the oath of allegiance to their country chanted by generations of schoolchildren before the practice was scrapped three years ago. This proud, flag-waving...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
NAPOLEON WAS IMPRESSED with Istanbul. If all the world were a single state, he said, this city should be its capital. A generation ago, when it looked musty and neglected, that would have seemed far-fetched, but now this great metropolis at the confluence...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
What Koza Ipek supporters thought of the state takeover FOR 400 YEARS, says a founding myth common to Turkic peoples from China to the Aegean sea, forebears of the Turks were trapped in the rocky valley of Ergenekon. But one day an ingenious blacksmith...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
HSBC—one of the two most pivotal banks in the global financial system, according to regulators, alongside JPMorgan Chase—exudes permanence. Its buildings are guarded by lions cast in bronze which passers-by touch for luck. HSBC has never been bailed...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
BAD news for the members of American private final salary pension schemes. January's falling stockmarkets and corporate bond yields mean that the aggregate deficit of companies in the S&P 1500 (not a typo; it's a broader measure than the 500) rose...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
SYRIA’S five-year civil war has killed hundreds of thousands of people and displaced millions more. It has sucked regional powers into a geopolitical vortex. It has inspired terrorists and fanatics, and exported violence to a historically volatile...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
smile
frown
NAIVETY and paranoia mark the European Union’s attitude to espionage. The EU does not have a spy agency, nor does it have access to the intelligence collected by its members and their allies. That has advantages: EU decision-makers need not worry about...
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown
From: The Economist | Thursday, February 4, 2016
smile
frown