Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

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On the banks of the Ohio ENERGY has been an economic bonanza for Texas in recent years, and a financial headache for its transport planners. The state recently forecast that maintaining the roads and bridges that serve its oil- and gasfields and wind...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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THE announcement on November 18th by Shinzo Abe, Japan’s prime minister, that he was calling a snap general election was made to sound a bold one. The poll would in effect be a referendum on postponing a planned second rise in the consumption tax,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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WHAT would Afghanistan look like now if Ashraf Ghani, not Hamid Karzai, had been the Anglophone Pushtun promoted by America, back in 2001, to lead the country? Afghanistan’s new president, a frail figure in white salwar kameez, grins, eyes twinkling,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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Nice rich people are looking out for you IN FRONT of the skyscrapers on the esplanade in Panama City, joggers puff along a path in the morning heat, as men and women do push-ups and bench-presses. In this part of Panama the enemies are fat and diabetes....
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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WHEN Shinzo Abe made the case, in late 2012, that he was the man to save the economy and revive Japan, voters handed him a landslide general-election win. This week, just two years on, the prime minister dissolved the Diet’s lower house and declared...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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BARACK OBAMA gives a good speech: that much is clear. For your British correspondent, inured to the lazy xenophobic rhetoric of his country’s politicians, it is hard not to be uplifted by the president’s appeal to Americans to accept immigrants as...
From: The Economist | Friday, November 21, 2014
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“BEHIND the Beautiful Forevers”, an award-winning book by an American journalist, Katherine Boo, charts the real lives of several families living in Annawadi, Mumbai, a third-world slum in the shadow of a first-world airport. The narrative revolves...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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LET'S put aside the political, legal and constitutional implications of the executive action on immigration that the president will announce tonight for a moment and look at the problem that Barack Obama is trying to address. Here are all the numbers...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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Our interactive business-confidence graphicEXECUTIVES around the world remain upbeat about the prospects for business but this optimism is on the wane, according to the latest Economist/FT survey of around 1,500 senior managers, conducted by the Economist...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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SINCE OUR print-edition piece last week, Ukraine’s economy seems to have stabilised a little. The currency fell by about 2% this week against the dollar, much better than what happened the week before (when there was a 14% drop). Ukraine's central...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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Crowded BritainSIR – The finding in an academic study by Christian Dustmann and Tommaso Frattini that immigrants to Britain from elsewhere in Europe make a net fiscal contribution does not justify high levels of immigration (“What have immigrants...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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ALAN GREENSPAN was a master of abstruse language as chairman of the Federal Reserve. “If you understood what I said, I must have misspoken,” he once joked. At least Mr Greenspan spoke. In China the central bank has made a habit of silence. Policy...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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ACCORDING to Joe Manchin, a Democratic senator from West Virginia, one advantage of the Keystone XL pipeline is that “wars could be prevented”. Barbara Boxer of California, also a Democrat, says that the pipeline would bring Shanghai-like smog to...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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IT IS November, and the Christmas lights are out on Regent Street, the red cups are on offer at Starbucks and financial commentators are making their forecasts for 2015. The best way of judging the consensus is to read the survey from Bank of America...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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Queuing for the last of the cheap stuff WHEN Joko Widodo, Indonesia’s president, who is generally known as Jokowi, announced that petrol and diesel prices would rise by 2,000 rupiah ($0.16) per litre on November 18th, Hajji Zaenal and the world’s...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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A desire named streetcar A TINY scarlet hut on Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Thelma’s Kitchen and Rib Shack, serves up world-beating catfish and grits. Demand for its grub is about to soar. The reasons why sit under a nearby bridge: four shiny new streetcars,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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Mr Artamonov looks out for opportunity ANATOLY ARTAMONOV, the energetic and resolute 62-year-old governor of Kaluga, knows what he wants: foreign investment, competition, an open relationship with Europe and America. And some of it he’s getting. While...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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AFTER eight years of double crossing and frustration a deadline looms. November 24th is the cut-off for a deal to ensure that Iran’s nuclear programme is peaceful. Much work remains. Is agreement possible and what would it encompass?Iran is looking...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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THE pot-bangers are back. On November 13th several thousand gathered outside the Casa Rosada, the president’s residence, in Buenos Aires to protest against corruption, runaway inflation, crime and above all the government of Cristina Fernández de...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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BETWEEN getting out of his car and starting work in the morning, Bashir Akinyele, a beret-wearing history teacher in Newark, New Jersey, passes the sites of two murders. His school, Weequahic High, once taught Philip Roth, a giant among America’s novelists....
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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THE sight of Jews lying dead in a Jerusalem synagogue, their prayer-shawls and holy books drenched in pools of blood, might be drawn from the age of pogroms in Europe. Sadly, it is an appallingly modern episode, the latest in the interminable tragedy...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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IT WAS great while it lasted. In a golden period from 2003 to 2010 Latin America’s economies grew at an annual average rate of close to 5%, wages rose and unemployment fell, more than 50m people were lifted out of poverty and the middle class swelled...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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THE right thing, done the wrong way. That may well be history’s judgment on President Barack Obama’s plan to shield millions of immigrants from deportation.Mr Obama’s executive action, due to be unveiled in a televised address on November 20th...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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PICTURE a heroin addict. “A bum sitting under a bridge with a needle in his arm, robbing houses to feed his addiction,” is what many people might imagine, believes Cynthia Scudo. That image may have been halfway accurate when heroin first ravaged...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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A DEMOCRAT running for office in northern California might consider targeting the money pots of San Francisco or San Jose. But the smaller, wealthier suburb of Palo Alto would be a surer bet. Palo Alto’s residents gave 3.5 times more per head than...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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TIM WU, a frequent contributor to the New Yorker, wrote an essay recently about why he, a long-time customer of United Airlines with more than 700,000 miles flown, has decided to "leave" the airline. Here's the meat of it:On the “new” United, seats...
From: The Economist | Thursday, November 20, 2014
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WITH the latest legal challenge to Obamacare coming to their courtroom in early 2015, and with arguments over same-sex marriage likely to follow, the nine justices will soon decide whether to roll back rights and benefits that millions of Americans already...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 19, 2014
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THE leading surgeon and author discusses how doctors in rich countries handle end-of-life care, and why we must not shy away from the question of our own mortalityContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 19, 2014
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TOMMY LEE JONES'S tremendous new film, “The Homesman”, is a boldly unusual western, in that the villain cannot be defeated in a gunfight at high noon. The villain, if there is one, is the land itself: the flat, dry, dusty terrain of Nebraska in the...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 19, 2014
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"SECULAR stagnation" is not a new idea. It was first popularised by Alvin Hansen, an economist and disciple of John Maynard Keynes, in the stagnant 1930s. Hansen thought a slowing of both population growth and technological progress would reduce opportunities...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 19, 2014
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BUSINESS travellers are never happier than when moaning about how, with smartphones and laptops, they are now always at the beck-and-call of the office. It is undoubtedly true that modern-day communications can be a tyrant. Yet there can often be something...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 19, 2014
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Mapping America's marijuana muddleSMOKING, growing, buying, selling or merely possessing cannabis is a criminal offence, according to America's federal government. Ask the states, however, and you will get almost 50 different answers. In 13 of them...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, November 19, 2014
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THREE times in the last 35 years, Russian military forces have crossed international borders - in Afghanistan in 1979, Georgia in 2008 and the Crimea earlier this year. As Simon Derrick, the currency strategist at BNY Mellon points out, each occasion...
From: The Economist | Friday, November 21, 2014
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CHINA has cut interest rates for the first time in more than two years, a powerful signal that the government want to step up support for the slowing economy. As fate should have it, a rate cut was the very thing we had called for in our leader on Chinese...
From: The Economist | Friday, November 21, 2014
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EVERY country, bar America, seems to want a weak currency at the moment to hold off deflation. Some, like the Japanese, actively seem to be pushing the currency down. Sterling may have fallen off the radar but it has five key weaknesses.Political uncertainty....
From: The Economist | Friday, November 21, 2014
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IT HAS been nearly two decades since the west coast of America saw a big Keith Haring exhibition, so the one at the de Young Museum in San Francisco is particularly welcome. Haring was a ground-breaking street artist inspired by social activism and progressive...
From: The Economist | Friday, November 21, 2014
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A NEW travel app designed to help take the solitude out of lonely road trips had its "hard launch" recently". Tripr, the brainchild of Nicholas Green and Alexander Dru, allows travellers to enter an itinerary and seek out like-minded companions who will...
From: The Economist | Friday, November 21, 2014
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