Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
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  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
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NEARLY 21 years ago, Justice Harry Blackmun declared he would “no longer tinker with the machinery of death.” In his last few months on the Supreme Court before retiring in the summer of 1994, Justice Blackmun abandoned his previous view that capital...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Quantitative easing? Bah humbug!TIRED of lightweights bickering over the financial crisis and its aftermath? Of economic upheaval becoming merely fodder for intellectually dishonest political campaigns? Wonder what biggest thinkers might have to say? Our...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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HOW American sanctions might bite on Russian banks is a matter of great interest to the Kremlin. So Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service, the SVR, asked one of its undercover agents in New York to find out, prosecutors claim. Evgeny Buryakov was outwardly...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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BEING a doctor in America is a lucrative profession. Just how lucrative depends on where people choose to practise. The map above is based on pay data from more than 18,000 practitioners of internal medicine, and was gathered by a firm called Doximity,...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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THIS week: The implications of the Greek election and Davos deconstructed ...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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STEPHEN DALDRY has a terrifyingly busy schedule. He recently directed two plays in London, David Hare’s “Skylight” and Peter Morgan’s “The Audience”, which are transferring to Broadway this spring. Also with Mr Morgan he is developing “The...
From: The Economist | Monday, January 26, 2015
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INTERNATIONAL AIRLINES GROUP (IAG), the parent company of British Airways and Iberia, Spain’s flag carrier, has made a third offer to buy Aer Lingus, an Irish competitor. The offer is worth €2.55 ($2.86) a share, which values the Irish airline at...
From: The Economist | Monday, January 26, 2015
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GREECE will have a new prime minister, and Europe its first anti-austerity government, following elections on January 25th. Syriza, a left-wing party led by Alexis Tsipras, claimed around 36% of the vote, an eight-percentage-point lead over the New Democracy...
From: The Economist | Monday, January 26, 2015
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PROSPERO had expected a scrimmage. The organisers of the annual Jaipur Literature Festival (JLF), held this year between January 21st and 25th, advertise it as the world’s “largest free literary festival”. Moreover, the topic he had been invited...
From: The Economist | Monday, January 26, 2015
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THE Greek voters have opted for a break from "politics as usual";  investors are assuming that "politics as usual" will occur after all (European stockmarkets are slightly higher today). One group is bound to be extremely disappointed.Alexis Tsipras...
From: The Economist | Monday, January 26, 2015
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GREECE will have a new prime minister, and Europe its first anti-austerity government, following elections on January 25th. Preliminary results show that Syriza, a left-wing party led by Alexis Tsipras, has won handsomely, claiming around 36% of the...
From: The Economist | Sunday, January 25, 2015
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LIKE all good films about robots, “Ex Machina” is really about people. It’s a gripping thriller concerned not just with how human artificial intelligence (AI) can seem, but also with how robotic and devoid of humanity people can be too. A tight...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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LOW OIL prices are not good for the Nigerian economy. In its latest forecasts, the IMF's predictions for the Nigerian economy in 2015 have been cut—from over 7% growth to about 5%. The naira, Nigeria's currency, is doing badly. But what are the effects...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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IMMIGRANTS have become an easy target for populist politicians in Europe. Sluggish economic growth, an influx of refugees and the recent terrorist attacks in Paris have stirred up public antipathy to foreigners. But Europe's ageing workforces need replenishing....
From: The Economist | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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IF the broader markets still remain fairly sanguine about the election of Syriza, that is certainly not true of investors in Greece itself. The yield on three-year bonds is now up to nearly 17% and Greek bank shares are down 20% today, with the broader...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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IN 1978 Janet Delaney was a photography student at the San Francisco Art Institute who had spent six months travelling through Guatemala, Nicaragua and El Salvador, taking photographs and interviewing people about the impact of civil war there. On her...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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FACE it: many business travellers are utterly dependent on their smartphones. But taking a smartphone on an international business trip can get complicated—and expensive. If you don't have a company phone that's already set up for international travel,...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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