Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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HOW resilient are emerging-market economies? Many are struggling, thanks to the economic impact of a strong dollar. But what would happen if things suddenly got a lot tougher? A new paper, from Liliana Rojas-Suarez of the Centre for Global Development,...
From: The Economist | Friday, March 27, 2015
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HARRY REID, the leader of the Democratic minority in the Senate, announced today that he will not seek re-election. The Nevada senator was not due to face voters again for nearly two years. Yet in the run up to the midterm elections in 2014, Americans...
From: The Economist | Friday, March 27, 2015
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WITH "Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God", an investigation into sex abuse in the Catholic church, and “We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks”, Alex Gibney’s recent film-making history is dominated by crunchy analytical documentaries....
From: The Economist | Friday, March 27, 2015
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THIS week's print edition has an array of economics articles that may be of interest. The following have particularly caught our eye:South Korea's economy: A tiger in winter (Finance)Milk and economic development: No use crying (Finance)Inequality...
From: The Economist | Friday, March 27, 2015
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DESPITE all the partisan bickering, Americans are an increasingly tolerant bunch. A new study published in Social Forces, an academic journal, finds that the country’s attitudes towards once-marginalised groups, such as communists, gays and atheists,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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  Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames.THE British House of Commons, the elected and more powerful of Parliament’s two chambers, is laid out for adversarial politics: the opposing front benches are said...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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"THIS is a great time for Americans to travel internationally," the Washington Post proclaimed last month. The main reason? The strong dollar. Russia is now a much cheaper place for Americans than it was a year ago but, of course, there's less reason...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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2015 General Election - UK Constituencies Current seats Geographic SchematicMarginal seats Geographic SchematicHouse prices Geographic SchematicPopulation Geographic Schematic Source: The Economist ...Continue reading...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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LITTLE more than a decade ago King Abdullah II of Jordan sounded a warning that America’s toppling of Saddam Hussein in Iraq would lead to the emergence of an Iranian-influenced “Shia crescent”—code for Iranian expansion—from Lebanon to Saudi...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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RIDING on robust growth and democratic reforms, Turkey’s pro-Islamist Justice and Development (AK) party has won three terms in power since 2002. With parliamentary elections due on June 7th, its secular rivals gloomily thought that AK was poised for...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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JOE JEAN, A 25-year-old Haitian, cannot believe his luck. In the aftermath of the earthquake of 2010, University of the People, an American online university, offered scholarships to Haitians. Mr Jean took one of them up to study computer science and,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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THE STUDENT STRIKE in Quebec in 2012 did not just bring down the province’s government; it also revealed deep cultural differences in ideas about university funding. French Canadian students, influenced by European thinking, were outraged that their...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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Making ends meet IN HARD and uncertain times, a tax amnesty can be a fillip to the popular mood. Stelios Alivizakis, an engineering consultant struggling to survive in Greece’s depressed property market, was overjoyed when the radical left-wing Syriza...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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IN MANY ways Paul Kagame, the Rwandan president, is one of the most successful leaders in modern African history. He led an ethnic-Tutsi militia that in 1994 ended a genocide perpetrated by the Hutu majority. The guilty were punished in courts under...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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A passenger jet operated by Germanwings, Lufthansa’s low-cost subsidiary, crashed in the French Alps on March 24th, killing all 150 people on board. The Airbus A320, en route from Barcelona to Düsseldorf, had reached cruising altitude before suddenly...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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ON A manicured fairway in Morocco’s capital, Rabat, a muezzin’s call to prayer drowns out the crack of a well-aimed iron and the whirr of a little white ball. As a hobby and a business, golf may be past its peak in Europe, North America and Japan,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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IF YOU LEARNED that the top dogs in a particular market were the same as 100 years ago, you would probably surmise that the business concerned had suffered a century of stagnation. In the case of higher education, which has been dominated by American...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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SAUDI ARABIA was only going to tolerate the advances of the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels for so long. Early on the morning of March 26th the kingdom said it had started a military operation in neighbouring Yemen to push back the Houthis and reinstate...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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IN ORDER TO produce innovative research and to stretch the best brains, a modern, democratic country needs excellent universities. In order to provide equality of opportunity and exploit people’s talents to the full, it needs to give its cleverest...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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RUNNING a human-rights-oriented foreign policy is a challenge, even for the Swedes. In October Sweden became the first Western government to recognise the state of Palestine. Margot Wallstrom, the foreign minister, was duly invited to address a meeting...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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IN HIS PROPOSAL for reforming the curriculum at William and Mary College in Virginia, Thomas Jefferson wrote that it should nurture “those talents which nature has sown as liberally among the poor as the rich, but which perish without use, if not sought...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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Cursed resource DEAD fish wash up on the once-fertile shores of creeks around Bodo, a town in the Niger delta, that are covered with crude oil more than six years after two massive spills. Locals have only now received compensation from Shell, the oil...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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BARELY a day has gone by since the Israeli prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, won re-election on March 17th without one senior American official or another chastising him in public. On March 23rd officials leaked word claiming Israel had spied on America’s...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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FOR the past year, Ukraine’s government has enlisted the help of the country’s powerful oligarchs in fighting its war against pro-Russian separatists. This week a new war opened up, pitting the government against one of the very oligarchs it had...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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AS JAMIL SALMI leaves the stage at a Times Higher Education conference in Qatar, he is mobbed by people pressing their cards on him. As a former co-ordinator of the World Bank’s tertiary-education programme and author of a book entitled “The Challenge...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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THE timing was certainly awkward. Talks between Greece and the euro zone were on a knife-edge. Beset by rumours that Greece was running out of money, Alexis Tsipras, the prime minister, had agreed to propose reforms to unlock bail-out funds. Then, just...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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WHEN MASSIVE OPEN online courses (MOOCs) took off three years ago, there was much concern that they would destroy traditional universities. That isn’t happening. “We’re doing a better job of improving job skills than of transforming the university...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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SOMETIMES small elections are markers of major political change. France’s latest vote, a two-round ballot on March 22nd and 29th to elect deputies to the 98 assemblies of France’s “departments”, may well turn out to be just such an election....
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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“AS LONG as I am governor of New Jersey, there won’t be legalised marijuana in this state,” vowed Chris Christie, governor of New Jersey, on March 25th. A potential Republican contender in the 2016 presidential race, Mr Christie explained that...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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“AFTER God had carried us safe to New England, and we had builded our houses, provided necessaries for our livelihood, reared convenient places for God’s worship and settled Civil Government, one of the next things we longed for and looked for was...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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IN 2014 asylum applications to rich countries reached their highest level for over 20 years, according to data from the UNHCR, the UN's refugee agency. Around 866,000 applications were lodged, a 45% increase on the previous year. Two-thirds of those...
From: The Economist | Thursday, March 26, 2015
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“WRITE with nouns and verbs, not adjectives and adverbs ” is a traditional bit of style advice. The aim is to get young writers picking a few words that tell, rather than bulking out their prose in the hopes of convincing by sheer mass.But does...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, March 25, 2015
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IN RECENT years there has been much talk of a “renaissance” in American manufacturing. A few things seemed to be on the side of the makers. For instance, until recently the dollar was weak. American wages were stagnant, but those in China were booming....
From: The Economist | Wednesday, March 25, 2015
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THE Stansted Express is one of those double-speak brands of which marketing types are so fond. The “Express” is in reality a grimy train which takes nearly 50 minutes to trundle the 30 miles from central London to Stansted Airport, through greenbelt...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, March 25, 2015
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LAST week, the markets were braced for the Federal Reserve to drop the word "patient" from its commentary, signalling that a rate rise might follow in the summer. The word was dropped, but the rest of the Fed statement was much more dovish than expected....
From: The Economist | Wednesday, March 25, 2015
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SINCE the publication of "Capital in the Twenty-First Century", Thomas Piketty has won many plaudits for his work on inequality. The book has so far sold more than 1.5m copies. Its arguments have been praised by Nobel-prize winners and politicians alike....
From: The Economist | Wednesday, March 25, 2015
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MESSENGERS are arguably the most successful smartphone apps. The ten biggest collectively boast more than 3 billion accounts. WhatsApp, the leader, has 700m. The number of WhatsApp messages sent every day now exceeds the number of standard texts. Last...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, March 25, 2015
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