Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
ARGENTINA and its debt, Russia and the discount that investors apply to it, and the SEC's new rules on money-market fundsContinue reading...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 28, 2014
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How the first world war changed the worldON JULY 28th 1914 Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, beginning the first world war. In the following four years, millions would lose their lives. What else changed? Economies shrank, stagnated and hyperinflated....
From: The Economist | Monday, July 28, 2014
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ASK liberals how to reduce poverty and they usually have a handful of policies ready to go, complete with spreadsheets suggesting their likely impact and a real-life example from a hitherto obscure province of Sweden. Compared with this, conservative...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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“THIS dollar-a-day measure,” says Amartya Sen, a Nobel laureate in economics, “doesn’t take into account many variations that influence the conversion of income into good living.” Mr Sen argues that if we simply focus on eradicating extreme...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 28, 2014
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“THE Mad and the Bad”, Jean-Patrick Manchette's 1972 crime thriller, starts without preamble: “The man whom Thompson was supposed to kill—a pederast guilty of seducing the son of a businessman—entered his bedroom. As he closed the door behind...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 28, 2014
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THERE has been something of a kerfuffle in Boston recently about Haystack, a smartphone app that allows drivers sneakily to reserve a parking space in the city. The idea is that, on days when an unused parking meter is proving impossible to find, someone...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 28, 2014
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THAT men and women think differently is now widely accepted. Why they do so is another matter. One possible explanation is that it is an evolutionary trait. In the time of hunting and gathering different skills were required: men needed to spend time...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 28, 2014
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A STAND at the entrance of a Teavana tea store heralds the arrival of Monkey Picked Oolong Tea. “According to legend, Buddhist monks trained monkeys to harvest the youngest leaves from the tops of wild tea trees,” the placard explains. Behind the...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 28, 2014
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THE DROUGHT afflicting California—now heading into its third year—has taken a turn for the worse. It seems that 2014 is shaping up to be the driest in nearly a century. Back in January, Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of drought emergency,...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 28, 2014
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FOR years Africa was a backwater for al-Qaeda-linked insurgents, but today it is rising axis for extremism. Two African insurgencies now rank among the most dangerous internationally: Boko Haram in Nigeria and Somalia’s al-Shabab. Going by the number...
From: The Economist | Monday, July 28, 2014
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THIS week our correspondents discuss fly-inspired hearing aids and Airbnb’s move into business travel Continue reading...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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THREE airless aluminium warehouses, shaped like giant armadillos, sit hunched on the outskirts of Kabul. Inside hundreds of volunteers and international election observers have been bustling around in stifling heat, arguing over the shape of tick-marks...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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The current ebola outbreak is the worst on recordLIBERIA has closed most of its borders, banned public gatherings and announced quarantines of some communities in an effort to contain an outbreak of the ebola virus. So far this year there have been 1,201...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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VLADIMIR PUTIN’S Kremlin often gets what it wants. But on July 28th the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the Hague demonstrated that its triumphs may come at a price: the court ruled that the 2003 prosecution of Mikhail Khodorkovsky (pictured) and...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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GRUBHUB, an online restaurant-delivery-service, says it has seen a big increase in the number of orders it receives from hotel guests. This, reports Skift, has coincided with a 9.5% drop in the revenue hotels made from room service between 2007 and 2012,...
From: The Economist | Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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