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LAST year Japan lowered the voting age from 20 to 18. But Minami, a high-schooler from Tokyo, does not plan to vote in an election for the upper house of the Diet, or parliament, on July 10th. Like many Japanese, she finds politics dull. The upcoming...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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Justice Kennedy’s new friends LAST June, the Supreme Court capped its most liberal term in decades by backing a right to same-sex marriage and rescuing Obamacare from a second near-death experience. One year later, contrary to expectations, the justices...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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AT A packed sangria bar in Washington Heights, a neighbourhood in upper Manhattan, supporters of Adriano Espaillat danced and waved Dominican flags as they waited to hear the results of a primary election on June 28th. Mr Espaillat declared victory the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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A strategist, not a salesman JUAN MANUEL SANTOS, Colombia’s president, could be a candidate for the Nobel peace prize. But a few days after signing a ceasefire agreement with the FARC, effectively ending Colombia’s 52-year-war against the guerrilla...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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NOWHERE in Britain voted for Brexit as keenly as Boston. On June 23rd 77% of the Lincolnshire town’s eligible voters participated in the referendum, fully 76% of them voting to quit the EU. Why? One explanation is obvious. On the train from Grantham,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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ONE of the first results to be declared on referendum night was that of Sunderland, in north-eastern England. Remarkably, 61% voted to leave the EU, despite the fact that 7,000 local jobs depend on the city’s Nissan car plant, which exports just over...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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NARENDRA MODI, India’s prime minister, takes social media seriously, and wants members of his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) to do the same. A recent report by the BJP’s digital unit ranked all of its ministers and MPs by the number of their followers...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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Carney, calming BUSINESSES and financial markets hate uncertainty. The vote for Brexit gives rise to a surfeit of it. Ahead of the referendum, most economists agreed that leaving the EU would be costly for Britain’s economy in the longer term. Now...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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A soggy outlook in the shipyards HOW best to prop up the companies that power South Korea’s export-driven economy as the rest of the world slows? The government’s previous answer, the so-called “one-shot” bill, aims to help the worst-affected...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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Ms Sturgeon would like to see more of Mr Junker ON JUNE 29th, 27 heads of government convened for the second day of an EU summit. David Cameron was not of their number. It was a harbinger of things to come. European law recognises only one way for a...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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Pots of money no more? SOARING sales of instant noodles have for years been a reliable indicator of the insatiable appetites of China’s rising consumer class. China is the world’s biggest market for these flash-fried snacks infused with monosodium...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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ON JUNE 23rd Indonesia’s president, Joko Widodo, flew to the Natuna archipelago in the South China Sea, along with several ministers, to hold a cabinet meeting on board a warship patrolling the surrounding waters. Only days earlier the same warship...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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FOR this writer, a Londoner by birth, the weekly task of producing Banyan has been among the happiest spells in a 40-year involvement with Asia that began in August 1976, in what English-speakers then called Peking. China’s capital was a city of bicycles...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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I can’t talk right now IT WAS only six months ago that China and Taiwan achieved a symbolic breakthrough in their decades-long standoff: the two countries’ presidents met for the first time since the end of the Chinese civil war in 1949, both looking...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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IT WAS a gathering unlike any the European family had ever seen. In the Justus Lipsius building in Brussels his fellow leaders commiserated with Britain’s prime minister, David Cameron (not pictured, above) over his failure to keep his country in the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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IN MOST Muslim countries life slows down during Ramadan, the holy month in which the faithful fast during daylight hours. Many people nap during the day and feast at night. Working hours are reduced. Businesses open later and close earlier. In general,...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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Cornish patsies REDRUTH, a hardscrabble town of 14,000, was once at the heart of Cornwall’s mining industry. It sat atop the most bountiful earth in the “old world”, a local museum boasts: to the east, the “Copper Kingdom” of Gwennap; to the...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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FEW of the English people who voted to leave the European Union on June 23rd considered that in doing so they might trigger the break-up of another union: their own. Supporters of the EU in Scotland and Northern Ireland—both of which returned healthy...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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WEDGED behind the Casa Rosada, Argentina’s presidential palace, the Museo del Bicentenario (bicentenary museum) tells the story of the country’s leaders since the revolution against Spanish rule in 1810. Until recently, half its floorspace was devoted...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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TAJIKISTAN has the vainest ruler in Central Asia. Emomali Rahmon flies what may be the world’s largest flag atop what used to be the world’s tallest flagpole. His capital boasts that it will soon host the region’s biggest mosque, mainly paid for...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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The tax-dodgers are being scrutinised too JUNE 29th was judgment day in a case that has changed the face of corporate tax-planning. Antoine Deltour (pictured) and Raphaël Halet, two ex-employees of PwC, an accounting firm, and Edouard Perrin, a French...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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THE emerging stars of European scriptwriting have been raised on a rich diet of “The Sopranos”, “The Wire” and “Breaking Bad”, so it is little surprise that more are striving to write for the small—rather than the silver—screen. In the...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, June 29, 2016
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HEATHROW is probably the world’s most congested airport. It operates at 99% capacity; a plane lands or takes off there every 45 seconds. Most jets must circle London for a while until an air traffic controller can find them a landing slot on one of...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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“THE will of the British people is an instruction that must be delivered.” With these words David Cameron, flanked by his wife Samantha, announced his resignation on the morning of June 24th. There followed a vacuum. For a couple of days, neither...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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WHEN a small, unassuming film ambles into international festivals from an unlikely location—especially one marked by bucolic poverty—the jaded cinemagoer pauses. Never mind how many awards it has won. Are we here to see a movie, or to perform some...
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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A PROBLEM facing economists is that it won't be possible to assess the macroeconomic impact of the Brexit vote for quite some time. The official estimate of GDP growth in the third quarter of this year will not be published until late October....
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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THE campaign to leave the European Union repeatedly urged Britain to “Take back control”. It is now a week since voters narrowly opted for Brexit, and the country has seldom looked so wildly off the rails. The prime minister has handed in his notice....
From: The Economist | Thursday, June 30, 2016
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Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC) was the biggest bank in the world at the end of last year, according to The Banker, which ranks the top 1,000 banks by Tier-1 capital holdings (mostly common stock and retained earnings). Chinese banks now...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, June 29, 2016
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FOR nearly four years, it has been the same. Ask pretty much any Republican voter what they think of Hillary Clinton—whether at a political rally or emerging from a poll booth—and when they list the biggest reasons why they loathe and distrust her,...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, June 29, 2016
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Brexit shook global financial markets so hard that some saw parallels with the financial crisis of 2008. Through all the economic and political uncertainties, the vote will fundamentally change Britain and Europe.
From: The Economist | Wednesday, June 29, 2016
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THE last thing that America needs is more economic turmoil and political navel-gazing in Europe, a continent which—for all that it disappoints and maddens officials in Washington—remains a major trading partner and indispensable ally when the “free...
From: The Economist | Wednesday, June 29, 2016
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UNTIL last week, Justice Anthony Kennedy, a 28-year veteran on the Supreme Court bench, had never voted to uphold a race-based affirmative action policy....
From: The Economist | Tuesday, June 28, 2016
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IT HAS been easy to forget over the last week, but Britain is a relatively trivial 2.4% of the global economy. But even before the referendum, there were worries about global growth, particularly during the market wobble of January and February. The...
From: The Economist | Friday, July 1, 2016
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A WEEK ago, as news of the vote in favour of Brexit sunk in, global markets tumbled. In the space of two days, the S&P 500 dropped more than 4%, while Britain’s FTSE 250 fell about 10%. But then, strikingly, equity prices reversed themselves. The...
From: The Economist | Friday, July 1, 2016
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