Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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In the wake of a deadly avalanche on Mount Everest, Sherpas ask for concerns to be addressed.
From: National Geographic | By: Mark Jenkins | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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As we grapple with the tragic loss of 16 Sherpas in an avalanche in the infamous Khumbu Icefall on Mount Everest on April 18, we look to the Sherpa community help us better understand what they are experiencing. Karsang Sherpa now lives in Denver and...
From: National Geographic | By: Mary Anne Potts | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Sherpas submit list of demands to government for better working conditions on Mount Everest.
From: National Geographic | By: Mark Jenkins | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Mapping the path of the killer Everest avalanche through the notoriously dangerous Khumbu Icefall.
From: National Geographic | By: Mark Jenkins | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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The remains of Sherpa guides killed by an avalanche on Mount Everest on Friday, the deadliest day in the mountain's history, have been cremated.
From: National Geographic | By: Christine Dell'Amore | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Sange Sherpa lost a son on Everest. But for many climbers, he says, the risk is worth it.
From: National Geographic | By: Broughton Coburn | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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The echo of the massive avalanche that swept 16 climbers to their deaths last Sunday, April 18, while climbing through the Khumbu Icefall has been heard around the world. In recent years, Everest has become a flash point of incidents with more and more...
From: National Geographic | By: Max Lowe | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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In the wake of the deadliest day in Everest’s climbing history, we’re rounding up of the best articles from around the web covering the developments in Nepal. We will continue to update this list. Alan Arnette Blog: BREAKING #Everest2014: Largest...
From: National Geographic | By: Mary Anne Potts | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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See our picks for the World’s Best Ski Towns. Skiing is a family sport. And if you learned to ski before the age of 16, your parents likely played a significant role in the process.  Needless to say, the sport is gear intensive and expensive. Still,...
From: National Geographic | By: Reggie Crist | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Comparisons with Neanderthal DNA may point to genes that make us uniquely human and uncover the origins of genetic ailments.
From: National Geographic | By: Dan Vergano | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Scientists may next be able to exploit the deadly fly's live birth and mammalian-like milk in battle against sleeping sickness.
From: National Geographic | By: Jennifer Frazer | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Gina McCarthy, EPA chief, talks about Earth Day and how it became a global environmental event that on April 22 will include a billion people.
From: National Geographic | By: John Roach | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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In her new book, Ingrid D. Rowland explains of abiding allure of Pompeii over the centuries and laments the effects of neglect and the weather.
From: National Geographic | By: Eve Conant | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Astronomers have struggled to explain why a distant supernova was way too bright. Now, one team has figured it out.
From: National Geographic | By: Nadia Drake | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Abdel Kader Haidara had made it his life's work to document, as never before, Mali's achievements as an ancient center of progressive thought. When the jihadists came, he led the rescue operation to save 350,000 manuscripts.
From: National Geographic | By: Joshua Hammer | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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The coming weeks could determine whether tens of thousands will die in the world's newest country.
From: National Geographic | By: Scott Johnson | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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After what feels like a very long winter, it’s finally that time again: summer festival season! Time to break out the sunglasses, sandals, and portable fans in preparation for those carefree days of soaking in the sunshine and grooving to live music...
From: National Geographic | By: Lisa A. Walker | Thursday, April 24, 2014
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Enric Sala left a tenured position at prestigious Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the audacious marine ecologist showed up at Nat Geo's doorstep to outline his vision for protecting the last wild places in the ocean. That was five years ago. Today,...
From: National Geographic | By: Megan Heltzel | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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Sam Elias is a professional climber for The North Face. He has traveled all over the world for climbing. He recently returned from living in Morocco in a remote mountain village, developing new climbing and working with a humanitarian aid organization...
From: National Geographic | By: Sam Elias | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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Emma Fried-Cassorla can probably get away with saying she's from the City of Brotherly Love after spending most of her life there. In addition to working a day job in communications at the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation, this hometown enthusiast...
From: National Geographic | By: I Heart My City | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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The Bard of Avon was born 450 years ago (today, in fact) and, rightly so, England is celebrating his enduring legacy. Rather than zipping over to Stratford for the day and checking off Shakespeare sites from a list, I wanted to experience the landscapes...
From: National Geographic | By: Annie Fitzsimmons | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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When I know I'm going on a trip, I immediately start canvassing my network of friends around the world for advice about what to see and do. So when I heard I'd be heading to San Diego--my first time there--I went straight to Nat Geo Travel’s director...
From: National Geographic | By: Annie Fitzsimmons | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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The community of New Smyrna Beach, Florida welcomed Aleksander “Olek” Doba with a salute of cannons, when he appeared on the horizon in his yellow kayak, OLO.  He has now crossed the Atlantic twice, this time on the route between the farthest points...
From: National Geographic | By: Piotr Chmielinski | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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An experienced Everest climber assesses the impact of the deadly avalanche on climbers and the Sherpas who assist high-altitude expeditions.
From: National Geographic | By: Mark Jenkins | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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