Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
When Sharada Annamaraju moved to Hyderabad as a teenager, it wasn't exactly love at first sight. But time and distance can change a person. Eight years (and one language learned) later, she decided to give the capital of Andhra Pradesh in southern India...
From: National Geographic | By: I Heart My City | Wednesday, April 16, 2014
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Genetic study reveals that just four changes gave Streptococcus the ability to cause deadly disease.
From: National Geographic | By: Susan Brink | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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Paul Theroux has been charming readers--and rooting out surprising adventures in far-flung places--for more than half a century. Known for his fondness for train travel, love-hate relationship with Africa, and finesse with language, the veteran travel...
From: National Geographic | By: Leslie Trew Magraw | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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I set off from Miami without an agenda. I was headed south to Key West on the famous Overseas Highway and wanted to let serendipity lead the way. With only a short amount of time on my hands, I didn’t want to be saddled with an endless list of to-dos....
From: National Geographic | By: Annie Fitzsimmons | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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Aerosols in the atmosphere from Asia change weather in North America, says new study.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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Scientists studying ocean garbage discuss how the world might deal with it.
From: National Geographic | By: Laura Parker | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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Influential climate reports point to a pivotal moment in global warming diplomacy.
From: National Geographic | By: Dan Vergano | Thursday, April 17, 2014
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See guided adventure trips from National Geographic Adventures. From the cockpit of my expedition kayak, I watch in awe as the stadium-sized iceberg 500 feet away starts to roll over. The Arctic air is dead silent as the immaculately polished white ice...
From: National Geographic | By: James Dziezynski | Tuesday, April 15, 2014
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Time is running out to undertake technological and economic fixes to halt dangerous global warming, warns an international report.
From: National Geographic | By: Dan Vergano | Wednesday, April 16, 2014
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Museum staff will ditch the bubble wrap in favor of custom-molded plaster cradles when shipping a Tyrannosaurus rex to Washington, D.C.
From: National Geographic | By: Jane J. Lee | Wednesday, April 16, 2014
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When Wilson was 11 he tried to build an atom smasher. At 14 he achieved nuclear fusion. Now 19, he is working with subatomic particles. What will come next?
From: National Geographic | By: Tom Clynes | Wednesday, April 16, 2014
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Murderous pets and hungry jaguars are only some of the stories cultures use to explain lunar eclipses.
From: National Geographic | By: Jane J. Lee | Wednesday, April 16, 2014
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We all think our dogs have superhero powers. Jumpy actually does. His human friend is not so bad, either. Talk about best friends.
From: National Geographic | By: Mary Anne Potts | Wednesday, April 16, 2014
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For millennia, humans have looked at the moon and found meaningful figures in its craters and mountains. Why do we do this?
From: National Geographic | By: Nadia Drake | Tuesday, April 15, 2014
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The Miami of today may not look like any place my grandparents would recognize--at least from the outside. But Magic City's big heart and carousing spirit are here to stay.
From: National Geographic | By: Annie Fitzsimmons | Tuesday, April 15, 2014
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I’ve heard the horror stories: Hours on end spent in a stuffy car desperately trying to get to some specific event (a wedding, a theme park) on time with a constant chorus of “Are we there yet?” emanating from the backseat. It doesn’t have to...
From: National Geographic | By: Heather Greenwood Davis | Tuesday, April 15, 2014
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