Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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With the changing of the seasons comes a change in where we as travelers set our sights on going. Inspired by our latest list of best fall trips, Nat Geo Travel staffers shared their own favorite autumn escapes. Here's a dozen to get you dreaming about...
From: National Geographic | By: Leslie Trew Magraw | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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More people are eating local and organic foods, but the planetary diet still is not sustainable.
From: National Geographic | By: Andrea Stone | Monday, September 29, 2014
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Wildlife populations are in decline, with numbers of some animals falling by half in the past four decades, according to the 2014 Living Planet Report.
From: National Geographic | By: Christine Dell'Amore | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Annual Global Ocean Health Index includes the high seas for the first time, and scientists say the score could have been worse.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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The drive from Dublin to County Mayo unspools on a maze of country roads traversing low-slung hills, hummocks, and small towns where the pub still seems a main staple of life. So it is a soaring moment when I come to the western margin of Ireland and...
From: National Geographic | By: Keith Bellows | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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After a weekend eruption from Japan's Mount Ontake killed dozens of climbers this weekend, photographer Carsten Peter discusses the allure and danger of the pursuit.
From: National Geographic | By: Kelley McMillan | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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A 20-knot tailwind filled Yemaya’s sails and pushed us east at six knots. Her 27-foot hull rode the waves with ease and we took turns napping and reading between watches. We were sailing along Lake Superior’s “Shipwreck Coast,” also called the...
From: National Geographic | By: Dave Freeman | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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A six-month search for frogs that hadn't been seen in decades brings some species back from the dead.
From: National Geographic | By: Jane J. Lee | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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How did remote islands, now home to the world's largest marine reserve, come into U.S. possession? The story is for the birds, the bats, and their guano.
From: National Geographic | By: Dan Vergano | Monday, September 29, 2014
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Ernesto Ráez-Luna explains why he left the government after it weakened the country's environmental laws.
From: National Geographic | By: Emma Marris | Monday, September 29, 2014
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A recent debate at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics highlights the ongoing uncertainty over how to define the word "planet."
From: National Geographic | By: Nadia Drake | Monday, September 29, 2014
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Dozens of hikers died after a volcanic eruption in central Japan over the weekend.
From: National Geographic | By: Photograph by Kyodo, Reuters | Monday, September 29, 2014
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A British "elephant whisperer" and his best beloved helpers waged guerrilla warfare and carried refugees to safety.
From: National Geographic | By: Simon Worrall | Monday, September 29, 2014
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Now that kids worldwide have taken up their schoolbooks once again, we dug into the National Geographic archives for a look at reading around the world.
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Studies also examine less certain connections to droughts and storms.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Monday, September 29, 2014
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An Indian digital activist and a student in Seattle designed a way to empower people in the remote forests of northeast India.
From: National Geographic | By: Anthony Loyd | Monday, September 29, 2014
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John Krakauer calls current rehabilitation therapies medieval. Among his radical approaches: a cyber-dolphin named Bandit.
From: National Geographic | By: Cathy Newman | Monday, September 29, 2014
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China now holds the world's record for largest cave chamber, a mapping team reports, overturning an old record.
From: National Geographic | By: Dan Vergano | Monday, September 29, 2014
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Japan's Mount Ontake, which erupted this weekend, belongs to a class of "stratovolcanoes," which form where one continental plates dives beneath another and are known for erupting at unpredictable intervals.
From: National Geographic | By: Dan Vergano | Monday, September 29, 2014
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Viking reenactors from Foteviken, Sweden, descend on the nearby town of Höllviken.
From: National Geographic | By: Photograph by Johan Bavman, Institute | Monday, September 29, 2014
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Peccaries are like pigs: They wallow. In the Peruvian rain forest, those mud puddles are wildlife magnets.
From: National Geographic | By: Emma Marris | Monday, September 29, 2014
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As a new generation of Greeks reclaim their heritage, they’re looking past overtouristed islands like Mykonos to quiet stunners such as Ios. Reachable only by boat (including a daily ferry from Santorini), this 42-square-mile island in the Cyclades...
From: National Geographic | By: Costas Christ | Monday, September 29, 2014
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Public health officials work to quell fears about the first case diagnosed in U.S. while acknowledging that more cases are likely.
From: National Geographic | By: Karen Weintraub | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Where are the best places near your home to immerse yourself in autumn splendor? Here are some off-the-beaten-path favorites on the East Coast. The crunch of leaves marks my steps through a mosaic of yellows and oranges. In front of me, a maple glows...
From: National Geographic | By: Gabby Salazar | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Jackie DesForges is among a rare breed of individuals who were actually born and raised in Los Angeles. Various jobs in the travel industry have taken her to Chicago, Ireland, Israel, and, most recently, to New York City, where she works as a social...
From: National Geographic | By: I Heart My City | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Gene maps of monarch butterflies and related species suggest that an ice age shift explains their migrations, a study team suggests.
From: National Geographic | By: Dan Vergano | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Once the world's fourth largest lake, the vast Asian lake was drained for irrigation.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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