Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
As the new UN climate accord pushes countries to cut carbon emissions, the United States is making progress, But will it continue, and will it be enough?
From: National Geographic | By: Wendy Koch | Thursday, February 4, 2016
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South America is in the early stages of a rapidly developing health crisis that may pose a dire threat to people all over the world, but you would never guess it after talking with travelers who have trips to the region already booked. As I spoke with...
From: National Geographic | By: Kevin Farrell | Friday, February 5, 2016
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Cities around the world have a secret weapon in the quest to reduce emissions and boost energy efficiency.
From: National Geographic | By: Christina Nunez | Friday, February 5, 2016
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These "superb owls" are ready for the "Big Game," and they are not intimidated by the National Football League.
From: National Geographic | By: National Geographic Staff | Friday, February 5, 2016
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In the 1960s, an outbreak of rubella virus expanded women’s access to abortion in the United States. Could Zika do the same in Latin America?
From: National Geographic | By: Becky Little | Friday, February 5, 2016
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Why is the beloved African Grey Parrot almost gone from the forests of West and central Africa?
From: National Geographic | By: Paul Steyn | Friday, February 5, 2016
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A cosmic fender-bender births a new galaxy, and the Curiosity Mars rover takes an elaborate selfie.
From: National Geographic | By: Michael Greshko | Friday, February 5, 2016
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Disadvantaged people struggle to say safe from the emerging disease in Recife.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Friday, February 5, 2016
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A new video offers a fresh look at an endangered species that is slowly recovering.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Thursday, February 4, 2016
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Tanzanian Emily Kisamo’s murder came at a critical time during the fight against wildlife crime, say conservationists.
From: National Geographic | By: Maraya Cornell | Thursday, February 4, 2016
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Strange dome gave extinct mammal a trumpeting sound
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Switek | Thursday, February 4, 2016
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Like everyone everywhere, the people of the Philippines read the paper, watch TV, and consult their smartphones for information. But in this Southeast Asian nation, where society is bound by a complex web of familial relationships, if you really want...
From: National Geographic | By: Norie Quintos | Thursday, February 4, 2016
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From Caribbean sugar plantations to the South Atlantic island of St. Helena, researchers are unlocking the long-kept secrets of enslaved peoples.
From: National Geographic | By: Andrew Lawler | Thursday, February 4, 2016
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Saturn’s rings still hold mysteries—including a trick that makes one of its biggest rings look even bigger.
From: National Geographic | By: Michael Greshko | Wednesday, February 3, 2016
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Conservationists filmed El Jefe—which means “the boss” in Spanish—roaming Arizona’s Santa Rita Mountains.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Handwerk | Wednesday, February 3, 2016
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Criminal loggers and land snatchers are committing more murders around the world, but they almost always escape justice.
From: National Geographic | By: Rachel Nuwer | Wednesday, February 3, 2016
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Called nacreous or polar stratospheric clouds, the rare phenomena adorned the British sky in the wake of Storm Henry.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Wednesday, February 3, 2016
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Just as with people, gifts, perfumes, and displays of affection win wild hearts.
From: National Geographic | By: Liz Langley | Saturday, February 6, 2016
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Many northern species grow heavier, whiter fur to camouflage and keep warm in frigid weather.
From: National Geographic | By: Christy Ullrich Barcus | Saturday, February 6, 2016
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A new analysis from the Humane Society finds American hunters import more than 126,000 animal trophies a year.
From: National Geographic | By: Rachael Bale | Saturday, February 6, 2016
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It's time for fireworks, dancing, and the world's largest human migration.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Saturday, February 6, 2016
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