Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
National Geographic photographers are among the winners of Wildlife Photography of the Year.
From: National Geographic | By: Photograph by Michael Nichols | Friday, October 24, 2014
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A Silicon Valley vision: Instead of milking dairy cows, we could make milk in a lab with genetically engineered yeast.
From: National Geographic | By: Linda Qiu | Saturday, October 25, 2014
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An ancient Siberian man's DNA helps track humans' spread into Asia.
From: National Geographic | By: Dan Vergano | Saturday, October 25, 2014
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There are more ways than ever to make money writing about travel—from writing for third-party outlets (publications, websites) to working with travel-related companies such as luggage and clothing manufacturers, hotels, airlines, and tourism boards....
From: National Geographic | By: Don George | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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With the Keystone XL in limbo, a fight is brewing over another proposed pipeline that would carry oil-sands crude across Canada to the Atlantic coast.
From: National Geographic | By: Christina Nunez | Saturday, October 25, 2014
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An unprecedented drought is threatening São Paulo's water supply.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Saturday, October 25, 2014
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Purple robes swath a galaxy, shepherds dance above Saturn's rings, and fishing fleets outshine cities in this week's best space pictures.
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Sky-watchers eagerly anticipate a partial solar eclipse that will blanket much of United States and Canada in shadow.
From: National Geographic | By: Andrew Fazekas | Friday, October 24, 2014
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From mountain lions to wolves to snakes, see how scientists capture and tag wildlife to find out more about their secret lives.
From: National Geographic | By: Liz Langley | Friday, October 24, 2014
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See more photos like this in our Extreme Photo of the Week gallery. Skier Cody Townsend tells a little about this shot from the making of the new ski film, Days of My Youth, and schools us in the delights of Alaska’s Tordillos, the dramatic mountain...
From: National Geographic | By: Mary Anne Potts | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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The river town of Natchitoches dates to 1714, when French traders paddling up the Red River from the Mississippi put down roots here, making it the oldest permanent settlement in the entire 828,000-square-mile Louisiana Purchase. It immediately impresses...
From: National Geographic | By: Andrew Nelson | Friday, October 24, 2014
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John Moore's portraits of those who survived Ebola show happiness but also grief over lost loved ones and rejection by their communities.
From: National Geographic | By: Photograph by John Moore, Getty | Friday, October 24, 2014
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Countries around the world—including the United States—are learning a lot from the way these two West African nations have contained their Ebola cases.
From: National Geographic | By: Karen Weintraub | Friday, October 24, 2014
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I was working on an animated film in Los Angeles in 1982 when I was ordered back to Prague by the communist Czech government. I decided not to return even though I knew this meant I might not see my family again. Then, in 1989, the Berlin Wall fell....
From: National Geographic | By: Intelligent Travel | Friday, October 24, 2014
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Great bustards eat poisonous beetles to combat intestinal parasites—and possibly appear healthier to females, a new study suggests.
From: National Geographic | By: Jason Bittel | Friday, October 24, 2014
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Nearly 31 years ago the Big Island of Hawaii changed entirely. The Pu’u O’o Vent, now a significant part of the complex plumbing system that defines the Kilauea Volcano, was born under fire on the evening of January 3, 1983. The flows that followed...
From: National Geographic | By: Eric Leifer | Friday, October 24, 2014
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The Nike 2014 Hyperfuse apparel line has a “ghostly aesthetic,” and whether it makes you feel weightless like Casper or not, it looks very modern, very sexy, and very approachable. The transparent color-blocked nylon shell of the Tech Windrunner...
From: National Geographic | By: Steve Casimiro | Friday, October 24, 2014
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Thelma, a reticulated python, produced six baby snakes without the help of a male, new DNA evidence shows.
From: National Geographic | By: Linda Qiu | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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The dramatic geology and wide-open spaces of the American Southwest lend themselves to UFO activity—imaginary or real—making it one of the top spots for sightings. Roswell, New Mexico, may be the most notable name in extraterrestrial lore, but there...
From: National Geographic | By: Intelligent Travel | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Nat Geo Young Explorer Hannah Reyes is a photographer and travel enthusiast whose work has taken her to the unlikeliest of places to document threatened indigenous cultures. After growing up in the Philippine capital, Manila, she chose a similarly chaotic...
From: National Geographic | By: I Heart My City | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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National Geographic digs into its archives to find the most stunning and surprising photographs of volcanoes around the world.
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The moon took a bite out of the sun on Thursday for an exciting few hours. See the results.
From: National Geographic | By: Andrew Fazekas | Saturday, October 25, 2014
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Bumba lennoni is named for the British rocker but lives in Brazil.
From: National Geographic | By: Christine Dell'Amore | Saturday, October 25, 2014
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Global warming over the past few decades has caused chamois goats in the Italian Alps to get smaller.
From: National Geographic | By: Brian Clark Howard | Saturday, October 25, 2014
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