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NPR

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has called on his fellow Democrats to filibuster the nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, setting up a showdown that could undo Senate tradition.
From: NPR | By: Scott Detrow | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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A lot of pregnant women have been going into labor in Iceland. It just so happens to be nine months after Iceland's soccer team stunned England.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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The state has been using an unconstitutional, obsolete medical standard for determining whether convicted murderers are exempt from the death penalty because of mental deficiency, justices ruled.
From: NPR | By: Nina Totenberg | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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The president on Tuesday is signing an executive order with the intention to help bring back coal jobs. But clean energy jobs, like solar, have taken off, far outpacing coal.
From: NPR | By: Domenico Montanaro | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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In an interview, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the threat posed by artificial intelligence is "50 to 100 more years" away.
From: NPR | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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"Connection Lost: The Tinder Opera" is an 11-minute video dramatizing a young man's quest for love via the popular dating app. It marks an effort to adapt a 400-year-old art form to modern media.
From: NPR | By: Naomi Lewin | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down as unconstitutional the standards used by the state of Texas to determine whether a convicted murderer is mentally deficient and thus may not be executed.
From: NPR | By: Nina Totenberg | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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Speculation about Musk's new company, Neuralink, centers on the how it might correspond to his previous statements about incorporating artificial intelligence into human brains.
From: NPR | By: Bill Chappell | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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Jim Harrison lived as he wrote — vividly. One year after his death, a new collection of his essays on food, wine, writing and aging brings him roaring back in all his immoderate brilliance.
From: NPR | By: Heller McAlpin | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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The Aurora Australis is a display of neon green lights that dance across the southern skies. A plane took off from New Zealand to get a special view.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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Rachel Martin speaks with conservative commentator and radio host Hugh Hewitt about how the Trump White House and congressional Republicans plan to move their agenda forward.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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A man has finally returned a library book he took from a Montana library in 1982. He also included a $200 donation and an apology.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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The Trump administration said it would review tail pipe emissions and fuel standards. But the state of California is doing more to curb emissions from cars.
From: NPR | By: Sonari Glinton | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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Making the traditional foods of home on the holiday of Cheti Chand — which falls on March 29 this year — helps a member of the Hindu Sindhi diaspora feel less disjointed.
From: NPR | By: Pooja Makhijani | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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British Prime Minister Theresa May is officially triggering Article 50, the process of extricating the U.K. from the European Union.
From: NPR | By: Frank Langfitt | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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As House and Senate Intelligence Committees investigate Russian meddling in the U.S. election, commentator Cokie Roberts answers listener questions about the history of intelligence hearings.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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President Trump's environmental order proposes rolling back regulations. David Greene speaks with John Larsen of the Rhodium Group about the impact those rollbacks could have on emissions levels.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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Michael Evangelista Ysasaga's construction company has put in a bid to build a massive wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. He has family members in the U.S. illegally. He talks about how they reacted.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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Rachel Martin talks with former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, who is testifying before a Senate committee on the impact a border wall would have on cross-border trade in his state.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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Baseball season officially starts this Sunday. David Greene talks with ESPN baseball analyst Jessica Mendoza about what to expect this season.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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Earlier this month, two U.N. investigators went missing in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Now the U.N. confirms their bodies have been found. Human rights groups are demanding answers.
From: NPR | By: Michele Kelemen | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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The controversial study of climate engineering — aka deliberately messing with Earth's temperature — was finally starting to regain a measure of respectability. And then came President Trump.
From: NPR | By: Nell Greenfieldboyce | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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President Trump has signed an executive order intended to roll back climate change regulations. David Greene speaks with former Republican Rep. Bob Inglis about the implications.
From: NPR | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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A court-ordered settlement will mandate who pays for replacing 18,000 service lines in Flint, Mich. But it also may end some bottled water distribution that residents have been relying on.
From: NPR | By: Steve Carmody | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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It's March Mammal Madness, a bracket with real animals facing off in fictional battles. Hundreds of science classes are playing in schools around the country.
From: NPR | By: Kat Lonsdorf | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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The NPR program's inaugural 1971 broadcast has been added to the National Recording Registry, alongside other "aural treasures" like Judy Garland's "Over the Rainbow." Take a listen to the first show!
From: NPR | By: Colin Dwyer | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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Players demanded better pay — and not just leading up to each Olympic Games, as had been the case. During negotiations, they warned they would sit out the upcoming, U.S.-hosted world championships.
From: NPR | By: Barbara Campbell | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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An American, Michael Sharp, and a Swede, Zaida Catalan, went missing while traveling in the country. Authorities confirmed Tuesday their remains, and those of their interpreter, were found.
From: NPR | By: Barbara Campbell | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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Results from the U.S. Census in 2020 could remake the political map. Some census experts say the stakes for the upcoming national headcount are higher than normal.
From: NPR | By: Hansi Lo Wang | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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The websites screen out older job seekers by limiting the dates you can fill in forms, an investigation by the Illinois attorney general found. But other sites say they make a point of fairness.
From: NPR | By: Ina Jaffe | Wednesday, March 29, 2017
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A new study suggests that diet had a big influence in driving the evolution of brain size in primates. Monkeys who thrive on fruit have bigger brains than their plant eating neighbors.
From: NPR | By: Jessica Boddy | Monday, March 27, 2017
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Summer Zervos, a former contestant on The Apprentice, says Donald Trump engaged in "disgusting touching." Trump's legal team wants the case dismissed, at least until after the president leaves office.
From: NPR | By: Peter Overby | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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A spinal injury severed the connection between Bill Kochevar's brain and everything below his shoulders. But technology has given him a new way to control one arm and hand.
From: NPR | By: Jon Hamilton | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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Wilson "Bill" Minor spent nearly 70 decades documenting Mississippi's tumultuous political and social transformations. He was writing up until the last few months of his life.
From: NPR | By: Camila Domonoske | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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A spinal injury severed the connection between Bill Kochevar's brain and everything below his shoulders. But technology has given him a new way to control one arm and hand.
From: NPR | By: Jon Hamilton | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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The rule, which had not yet taken effect, would have required Internet providers to ask permission before selling consumers' personal data. President Trump is expected to sign the rollback.
From: NPR | By: Brian Naylor | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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President Trump is expected to sign a bill to overturn new privacy rules for Internet service providers. An expert says there are steps you can take though they won't deliver absolute privacy.
From: NPR | By: Alina Selyukh | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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The body of former President James Polk may be on the move again. He's been buried on the grounds of the Tennessee state Capitol, but there's discussion about moving his remains to his former home.
From: NPR | By: Chas Sisk | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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Frontman Wayne Coyne says he thrives in environments that combine art and chaos. Hear that conversation, plus live performances of songs from Oczy Mlody.
From: NPR | By: David Dye | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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Michelle Taylor is taking part in a project to reconstruct slave cabins at Montpelier, the estate of President James Madison. Through her research, she discovered a personal connection to the site.
From: NPR | By: Kelley Libby | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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President Trump signed a sweeping set of executive orders on Tuesday that aim to dismantle the Obama administration's efforts to combat climate change.
From: NPR | By: Nathan Rott | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with Donatella Rovera, senior crisis response adviser for Amnesty International, about evidence of American airstrikes destroying houses with entire families inside in east Mosul, Iraq.
From: NPR | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Louise Carter-King, mayor of Gillette, Wyo., about the impact that President Trump's executive order loosening regulations on coal will have on the the town.
From: NPR | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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Football is usually king on the campus of South Carolina. But, for this week, basketball rules as the men's team has reached it's first Final Four. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Gene Sapakoff, who covers the team for The Post and Courier.
From: NPR | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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House Rep. Adam Schiff updated NPR correspondents about the state of the House Intelligence Committee's investigation into President Trump's potential connections to Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential campaign. Schiff has called for the committee's...
From: NPR | By: Mary Louise Kelly | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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Russians are still trying to understand exactly what happened over the weekend, when thousands of people took part in anti-government rallies — the biggest demonstration of discontent since 2012.
From: NPR | By: Lucian Kim | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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The Scottish Parliament is expected to demand a second referendum on independence from the United Kingdom on Tuesday. Supporters want the vote to be in 2019 or 2020, just as Brexit negotiations are due to reach their final stage.
From: NPR | By: Frank Langfitt | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Sarah Kliff of Vox about how Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price could dismantle parts of the Affordable Care Act through regulations.
From: NPR | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Melissa Mays, a resident of Flint, Mich., and water activist. Mays was a plaintiff in the lawsuit that just reached a settlement in federal court, guaranteeing replacement of 18,000 lead and galvanized service lines in Flint....
From: NPR | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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Groups that help low-income families get food aid report a big drop in the number of immigrants seeking help. Some are canceling government benefits for fear it will affect their immigration status.
From: NPR | By: Pam Fessler | Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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