Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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NPR

The health law just needs a tuneup, says the CEO of Molina Healthcare, which operates in 12 states and Puerto Rico. The California-based insurer has seen profits, while Humana and Aetna struggled.
From: NPR | By: April Dembosky | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Monday on whether a North Carolina law that prevents registered sex offenders from "accessing" certain social media sites violates the First Amendment guarantee of free speech.
From: NPR | By: Nina Totenberg | Monday, February 27, 2017
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An Idaho judge concluded an attack on a black, mentally disabled teenager, in which his white teammate kicked a coat hanger up his rectum, was not a sexual assault or racially motivated attack.
From: NPR | By: Camila Domonoske | Monday, February 27, 2017
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Sunday night's best picture snafu at the Oscars was the biggest news of the evening. But it was also an important night for advertisers.
From: NPR | Monday, February 27, 2017
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The players tested a lot of new equipment so they'd be ready for next season. They tested mattresses, chose the perfect pillows, blankets and sheets — all to improve their dingy "sleep room."
From: NPR | Monday, February 27, 2017
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A 1989 Washington Post poll found that while two-thirds of those surveyed couldn't name any of the Supreme Court justices, 54 percent could identify Judge Wapner as the judge of The People's Court.
From: NPR | Monday, February 27, 2017
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It may look and sound like a State of the Union, but following tradition, Trump's remarks his first year in office will simply be an address to a joint session of Congress.
From: NPR | By: Rachel Quester | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Congressional Republicans are divided over the best path forward to deliver on the party's long-promised pledge to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.
From: NPR | By: Susan Davis | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Rev. Keary Kincannon of Fairfax County, Va., will attend Trump's address to Congress, and says he doesn't expect Trump will say anything to ease his parishioners' fears about immigration orders.
From: NPR | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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A long-shot idea has received recent attention: a plan that would set a price on carbon to encourage energy efficiency and limit the impact of climate change. Even the new CEO of Exxon Mobil backs it.
From: NPR | By: Uri Berliner | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Sweeping tax cuts, for businesses and individuals, will be at or near the top of the list for both the White House and the Republican-controlled Congress. A tax on imports may also be on the table.
From: NPR | By: John Ydstie | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Tuesday's speech to Congress is a chance to reset a tumultuous first month. Administration officials say President Trump will strike a more optimistic tone than he did in his inaugural address.
From: NPR | By: Jessica Taylor | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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More than 6,000 entries later, we have our champion. Watch the joyous video that won over all 10 judges unanimously.
From: NPR | By: Bob Boilen | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Democrats are preparing to respond to President Trump's speech to a joint session of Congress Tuesday night. David Greene talks to Mo Elleithee, executive director of the Georgetown Institute of Politics and Public Service, about what he expects Trump...
From: NPR | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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As Donald Trump prepares to address a joint session of Congress, David Greene talks to Maria Teresa Kumar, who heads Voto Latino, an organization that works to get out the Latino vote.
From: NPR | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Trump has denounced reporters for relying on leaks and unidentified sources. Yet, the White House has engaged in some leaks of its own to fight the media.
From: NPR | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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As the president prepares to address Congress, Steve Inskeep talks to Richard Haass of the Council on Foreign Relations to get a sense of what we might hear about foreign policy.
From: NPR | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Saba Ahmed, leader of the Republican Muslim Coalition, supports President Trump and has hope for his economic agenda, but wants him to make a strong statement Tuesday against religious prejudice.
From: NPR | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Many people are hoping President Trump will offer more details of his vision for his presidency in Tuesday night's speech to a joint session of Congress. David Greene talks to David Frum, senior editor at "The Atlantic" and former speechwriter for President...
From: NPR | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Dams and levees across California are straining to handle winter storms. The state's water system was designed a century ago, before climate change was an issue. Now, it's being rethought.
From: NPR | By: Lauren Sommer | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Steve Inskeep talks to Aryn Baker of "Time" magazine about a Liberian nursing assistant, who cared for Ebola patients, but who died earlier this month just after childbirth because no one would help her.
From: NPR | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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When an author portrays a culture that's not their own, inadvertent errors can be offensive. Some writers are turning to "sensitivity readers" who will look for details that don't ring true.
From: NPR | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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A showdown may be coming on the meaning of religious freedom, and LGBT advocates fear anti-discrimination protections could be weakened as a result.
From: NPR | By: Tom Gjelten | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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President Trump's plans, a rebuke of the prevailing push toward globalization, may overlook what's under the hood when it comes to manufacturing.
From: NPR | By: Scott Horsley | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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The presidential campaign has brought an unlikely candidate to the fore. Macron, a former banker and former economy minister, is surging in the polls. His message: Embrace innovation and risk.
From: NPR | By: Eleanor Beardsley | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Takata Corp., a Japanese auto parts maker, on Monday pleaded guilty to fraud and agreed to pay $1 billion for concealing a deadly defect in millions of its air bag inflators.
From: NPR | By: Doreen McCallister | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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In statistics, a frequentist interpretation looks only at the simple probability. But Bayes' Theorem works with conditional information rather than just looking at a positive result, says Adam Frank.
From: NPR | By: Adam Frank | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Trump has spoken about his commitment to "buy American and hire American." But what exactly does that mean? Some say it could mean higher costs for construction projects.
From: NPR | By: David Schaper | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Wilbur Ross, 79, made his fortune buying distressed companies and restoring them to health. Criticized by some as a "vulture capitalist," Ross received the support of the United Steelworkers union.
From: NPR | By: Mark Katkov | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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Maz Jobrani, an Iranian-American comedian, uses humor to critique President Trump — whom he describes as "good for comedy but bad for the world."
From: NPR | By: Maggie Penman | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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The court heard two cases today: One on whether the government can deport a resident for a statutory rape conviction, and another on whether a state can criminalize social media use for sex offenders.
From: NPR | By: Nina Totenberg | Tuesday, February 28, 2017
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It would be the first time humans have traveled beyond low-Earth orbit since the days of Apollo. The mission would be manned and financed by two private, anonymous customers.
From: NPR | By: Merrit Kennedy | Monday, February 27, 2017
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From the death that sparked a hashtag that became a national movement, Black Lives Matter takes on a new urgency under President Trump. Co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors discusses what lies ahead.
From: NPR | By: NPR Staff | Monday, February 27, 2017
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NSO conductor Steven Reineke led some 70 musicians in performing the interludes you hear between All Things Considered stories.
From: NPR | By: NPR Staff | Monday, February 27, 2017
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The aftermath of the controversial shooting went viral as it was streamed live on Facebook by the Castile's girlfriend.
From: NPR | By: Richard Gonzales | Monday, February 27, 2017
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New research calculates the greenhouse gas emissions involved in making bread, from wheat field to bakery. The vast majority of emissions come from one step in the process: farming.
From: NPR | By: Rhitu Chatterjee | Monday, February 27, 2017
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The new AG held his first on-record briefing as head of the Justice Department on Monday. He said he's "not a fan" of legalized marijuana use, and threats against Jewish centers are unacceptable.
From: NPR | By: Carrie Johnson | Monday, February 27, 2017
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The Detroit band makes hazy pop gems with sharp lyrics. Hear two songs.
From: NPR | By: David Dye | Monday, February 27, 2017
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Collectors, scholars and everyday people got the chance to peruse the Durham, N.C., home of the late John Hope Franklin, a world-renowned scholar of African-American history who died in 2009.
From: NPR | By: Leoneda Inge | Monday, February 27, 2017
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The WNYC podcast, "Note to Self," conducted an experiment called The Privacy Paradox, which involved thousands of people who tried to strengthen control over their personal information online.
From: NPR | Monday, February 27, 2017
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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with John Feltner, a machinist at the Rexnord plant in Indianapolis, which is moving operations to Mexico. President Trump took credit for preventing a Carrier plant, which is one mile away from the Rexnord plant, from moving...
From: NPR | Monday, February 27, 2017
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The repealed Securities and Exchange Commission rule required oil, gas and mining companies to disclose overseas payments. It was meant to promote transparency in countries riddled with corruption.
From: NPR | By: Michele Kelemen | Monday, February 27, 2017
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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Julie Brown, an investigative reporter at the Miami Herald, about her visit with Bill Owens, the father of the Navy SEAL killed last month during a raid in Yemen.
From: NPR | Monday, February 27, 2017
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Jewish cemeteries in Pennsylvania and Missouri have been hit by large-scale vandalism in recent weeks. It's unclear if there is an actual rise in such incidents or simply more reporting of incidents.
From: NPR | By: Tom Gjelten | Monday, February 27, 2017
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NPR's Kelly McEvers spoke to Ali in October about his experience working on the film, which won the Oscar for best picture.
From: NPR | Monday, February 27, 2017
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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Washington Gov. Jay Inslee about the National Governors Association meeting that took place over the weekend in Washington, D.C.
From: NPR | Monday, February 27, 2017
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People in India are reacting to the death of an IT worker shot in an apparent hate crime in Kansas.
From: NPR | By: Julie McCarthy | Monday, February 27, 2017
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President Trump's proposed increase in defense spending could help the Defense Department plug current holes in the force, but wouldn't cover the major expansion he supports.
From: NPR | By: Philip Ewing | Monday, February 27, 2017
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The Federal Communications Commission's new chairman wants to block a rule approved by his predecessor requiring Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon adhere to new privacy standards.
From: NPR | By: Brian Naylor | Monday, February 27, 2017
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A major blunder at the Academy Awards left La La Land producer Jordan Horowitz literally handing over his award to its rightful owner, the producers of Moonlight. NPR's Audie Cornish talks to Horowitz about the mistake.
From: NPR | Monday, February 27, 2017
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