Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
Researchers have discovered that the insulation plastic used in high-voltage cables can withstand a 26 per cent higher voltage if nanometer-sized carbon balls are added. This could result in enormous efficiency gains in the power grids of the future,...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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A Sun-like star with orbiting planets, dating back to the dawn of the Galaxy, has been discovered by an international team of astronomers. At 11.2 billion years old, it is the oldest star with Earth-sized planets ever found and proves that such planets...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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In the first systematic look at the economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention, researchers demonstrate that, in addition to transforming victims' lives, these programs may indeed save a significant amount of money compared to non-intervention,...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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A kinesiologist breaks down some simple steps to stick to your weight loss resolution for the full year. "If you start with lofty goals, it's easy to become discouraged if you don't meet those goals right away," she says. "Start by trying to do something...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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An efficient security protocol has been designed to protect the information provided by pacemakers and similar medical devices connected to the Internet. Thanks to the latest advances in microelectronics and communications technologies, it is not difficult...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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A high-altitude (>20 km) balloon platform is nearly ideal for carrying out scientific observations in a space-like environment, flight qualifying instrumentation, and transporting humans to the edge of space. This platform is regularly utilized by...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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How do you make an optical fiber transmit light only one way? Researchers have experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, the phenomenon of Brillouin Scattering Induced Transparency (BSIT), which can be used to slow down, speed up, and block light...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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Researchers have made a surprising discovery in the aquifers beneath the Western Australian desert, which challenges the traditional Darwinian view of evolution. They have discovered that a species of blind predatory water beetles -- living underground...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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Three marine biologists from Japan have discovered two new and unusually unique species of encrusting anemone. Unlike almost all known species within their genus, these two new species do not have light-harvesting symbiotic zooxanthellae, having lost...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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X-ray polarimetry promises to give qualitatively new information about high-energy astrophysical sources, such as black hole systems, the bright and active centers of galaxies, compact neutron stars, and gamma-ray bursts. The instrument will measure...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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Constructing tiny "mirrors" to trap light increases the efficiency with which photons can pick up and transmit information about electronic spin states -- which is essential for scaling up quantum memories for functional quantum computing systems and...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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Like the gaping mouth of a gigantic celestial creature, the cometary globule CG4 glows menacingly in this new image from ESO's Very Large Telescope. Although it appears to be big and bright in this picture, this is actually a faint nebula, which makes...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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Girls who frequently consume sugary drinks tend to start their menstrual periods earlier than girls who do not, according to new research. The findings are important not only because of the growing problem of childhood obesity in a number of developed...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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A spider commonly found in garden centers in Britain is giving fresh insights into how to spin incredibly long and strong fibers just a few nanometers thick. The majority of spiders spin silk threads several micrometers thick but unusually the 'garden...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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New experiments have uncovered a way of controlling friction on ionic surfaces at the nanoscale using electrical stimulation and ambient water vapor.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Psychopathic violent offenders have abnormalities in the parts of the brain related to learning from punishment, according to an MRI study.
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, January 28, 2015
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Sometimes it takes a village to find new and unusual objects in space. Volunteers scanning tens of thousands of starry images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, using the Web-based Milky Way Project, recently stumbled upon a new class of curiosities...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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A collaborative study suggests that the island's native culture reacted to natural environmental barriers to producing sufficient crops.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Citizen scientists wanted to know: What are the yellow objects on these infrared images from the Spitzer Space Telescope? Astronomers now report that the "yellowballs" are part of the development of massive stars....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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NASA's Dawn spacecraft has returned the sharpest images ever seen of the dwarf planet Ceres. The images were taken 147,000 miles (237,000 kilometers) from Ceres on Jan. 25, and represent a new milestone for a spacecraft that soon will become the first...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Scientists working with NASA's 230-foot-wide (70-meter) Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, California, have released the first radar images of asteroid 2004 BL86. The images show the asteroid, which made its closest approach on Jan. 26, 2015 at...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Researchers have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Fossilized remains of four ancient snakes have been dated between 140 and 167 million years old -- nearly 70 million years older than the previous record of ancient snake fossils -- and are changing the way we think about the origins of snakes....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Researchers have uncovered a promising new pathway to valleytronics, a potential quantum computing technology in which information is coded based on the wavelike motion of electrons moving through certain 2-D semiconductors....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Researchers create first mouse model of ovarian clear cell carcinoma using data from human cancer genome atlas. They show how when the genes ARID1A and PIK2CA are mutated in specific ways, the result is ovarian cancer 100 percent of the time. They show...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Researchers have used human pluripotent stem cells to generate new hair. The study represents the first step toward the development of a cell-based treatment for people with hair loss. In the United States alone, more than 40 million men and 21 million...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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With the aid of a non-invasive photographic technique, researchers at the EURAC-Institute for Mummies and the Iceman have been able to show up all the tattoos on the man who was found preserved in a glacier, and in the process have stumbled upon a previously...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Water-filled micropores in hot rock may have acted as the nurseries in which life on Earth began. A team has now shown that temperature gradients in pore systems promote the cyclical replication and emergence of nucleic acids....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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Death rates from lung cancer will exceed those for breast cancer for the first time among European women in 2015, according to the latest predictions. The study by researchers in Italy and Switzerland predicts that although the actual number of deaths...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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In big sagebrush country, re-establishing the ecosystem’s namesake shrub may jump-start the recovery process more successfully after oil and gas development than sowing grass-dominated reclamation seed mixes typically used to quickly re-vegetate bare...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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The efficacy and safety of the new fusion protein has been demonstrated in mouse models of aggressive human leukemia using leukemia cells taken directly from patients with ALL. Resistance of leukemia cells to contemporary chemotherapy is one of the most...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, January 27, 2015
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To better understand PLA2 enzymes and help drive therapeutic drug development, researchers developed 3-D computer models that show exactly how two PLA2 enzymes extract their substrates from cellular membranes....
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Successfully treating rabies can be a race against the clock. Those who suffer a bite from a rabid animal have a brief window of time to seek medical help before the virus takes root in the central nervous system, at which point the disease is almost...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Use of the same antiangiogenesis drugs that have improved treatment of some cancers could also help surmount persistent difficulties in treating tuberculosis, improving the effectiveness of drug therapy and reducing the emergence of resistant bacterial...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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To survive and fulfill their biological functions, cells need to take in material from their environment. In this process, proteins within the cell pull inward on its membrane, forming a pit that eventually encapsulates the material in a bubble called...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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A new breast cancer risk prediction model combining histologic features of biopsied breast tissue from women with benign breast disease and individual patient demographic information more accurately classified breast cancer risk than the current screening...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Scientists have revealed how a type of cancer-causing virus outwits the human body's immune response. The discovery might help explain why some cancer therapies that incorporate interferon fail to treat certain cancers and might lead to more effective...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Most young adults might assume they have years before needing to worry about their cholesterol. But new findings suggest that even slightly high cholesterol levels in otherwise healthy adults between the ages of 35 and 55 can have long-term impacts on...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Insomniacs who take longer than 14 minutes to fall asleep face a greater risk of hypertension, according to new research. This study is the first to test whether insomnia with physiological hyperarousal, defined as a longer time to fall asleep, is linked...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Those video ads playing in the corner of your computer screen, in the midst of multitasking, may have more impact than you realize. They may be as effective as ads you're really watching, says one expert. It depends on how you perceive and process media...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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The mechanism behind tubulin transport and its assembly into cilia have been observed in a new study, including the first video imagery of the process. "Cilia are found throughout the body, so defects in cilia formation affect cells that line airways,...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Significant gains in the understanding of angles and angle measurements by elementary school students are seen in those who performed body-based tasks while interacting with a Kinect for Windows mathematics program....
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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At 18 months median follow up of a phase 1 clinical trial, one patient's cancer had worsened, two had died, and nine remained free of disease. Testing of blood and tumor samples showed that CUDC-101 had indeed inhibited the action of EGFR, HDAC and Her2....
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Nature has many examples of self-assembly, and bioengineers are interested in copying these systems to create useful new materials or devices. Amyloid proteins, for example, can self-assemble into the tangled plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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The metabolic function of the essential enzyme laforin has been identified by researchers, which opens new pathways to treating the deadly Lafora's disease. Lafora disease occurs as a result of the laforin gene being mutated. Mutations in the gene encoding...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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A critical molecule has been identified by a team of dental scientists that helps explain why diabetics suffer from impaired healing. Their results pinpoint a target for therapies that could help boost healing....
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Astronomers have discovered that the ring system that they see eclipse the very young Sun-like star J1407 is of enormous proportions, much larger and heavier than the ring system of Saturn....
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Targeting a key enzyme and its associated metabolic programming may lead to novel drug development to treat lung cancer, researchers report. Cancer cells undergo metabolic alterations to meet the increased energy demands that support their excess growth...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Nearly three-quarters of homeless adults with mental illness in Canada show evidence of cognitive deficits, such as difficulties with problem solving, learning and memory, new research has found. The study-believed to be the largest of its kind -assessed...
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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Most patients presenting to the emergency department with syncope or dizziness may not benefit from head CT unless they are older, have a focal neurologic deficit, or have a history of recent head trauma....
From: Science Daily | Monday, January 26, 2015
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