Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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African American women born at a low or very low birth weight may be at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The findings may explain in part the higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes in African American populations, which has a high prevalence...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Everyone's heard of the birds and the bees. But that old expression leaves out the flowers that are being fertilized. The fertilization process for flowering plants is particularly complex and requires extensive communication between the male and female...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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New results show that it's possible to assess dietary compliance from a blood sample. This is especially useful in controlled dietary intervention studies investigating the health benefits of specific diets. So far, such studies have mainly relied on...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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Paleolithic inhabitants of modern-day Spain may have eaten snails 10,000 years earlier than their Mediterranean neighbors. Snails were widespread in the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, but it is still unknown when and how they were incorporated into human...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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New analyses of tiny fossil mammals from Glamorgan, South Wales are shedding light on the function and diets of our earliest ancestors, a team reports. Mammals and their immediate ancestors from the Jurassic period (201-145 million years ago) developed...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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A new online tool will help doctors predict which patients are most likely to develop diabetes. Experts say it could offer a cost-effective way to identify people with diabetes, as it avoids the need for significant investment in screening....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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College students are typically more sleep deprived than the rest of us and often ignore the health benefits of adequate slumber, said a researcher who studies the topic. "Sleep is extremely important to overall health," one researcher said. "Poor sleep...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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Specially-trained victim recovery dogs can perform phenomenal feats in sniffing out the whereabouts of bodies and body parts, even beneath mounds of rubble or deep below water. But now a researcher is investigating ways in which they can carry out their...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Are young people losing the ability to read emotions in our digital world? Scientists report that sixth-graders who went five days without even glancing at a smartphone, television or other screen did substantially better at reading emotions than sixth-graders...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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While the Greater Toronto Area has significantly reduced some of the toxins that contribute to smog, the city continues to violate the Canada-wide standards for ozone air pollution, a study shows. Smog, which can cause or aggravate health problems such...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Astronomers are delving into the mystery of what caused a spectacular supernova in a galaxy 11 million light years away, seen earlier this year. The supernova, a giant explosion of a star and the closest one to the Earth in decades, was discovered earlier...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Using heart-lung support technology, one Transplant Center was able to increase the number of kidneys, livers and pancreases available for transplant by about 20 percent. As of Aug. 6, 2014, 123,191 people nationwide were waiting for a solid organ transplant...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first close-up look at Neptune and its moon Triton in the summer of 1989. Like an old film, Voyager's historic footage of Triton has been "restored" and used to construct the best-ever global color map of...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Dengue fever could make headway in popular European holiday destinations if climate change continues on its predicted trajectory, according to research. The study used current data from Mexico, where dengue fever is present, and information about EU...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Citizen scientists are saving the lives of people living in the shadow of deadly volcanoes according to research. A report reveals the success of a volunteer group set up to safeguard communities around the 'Throat of Fire' Tungurahua volcano in the...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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A new study provides insight on how the brain processes external input such as touch, vision or sound from different sources and sides of the body, in order to select and generate adequate movements. The findings show that the striatum acts as a sensory...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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A wide range of epigenetic changes -— alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures -— in children with Crohn's disease (CD), has been observed and reported in a new study. Crohn's disease is a painful, medically...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Bottled water sold in Spain is practically free of constituents given off by plastic packaging or glass bottle lids. They are only detected in some cases, albeit in quantities much lower than limits found harmful for health, an analysis of more than...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Targeted automated alerts in electronic health records significantly reduce urinary tract infections in hospital patients with urinary catheters. In addition, when the design of the alert was simplified, the rate of improvement dramatically increased....
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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For the first time, results from a large-scale study of the significance of genetic, clinical and lifestyle factors for protein levels in the bloodstream have been shown. The results show that genetics and lifestyle are determining factors for protein...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Cow milk allergy occurs in children and in adults. Scientists have investigated what actually makes the milk allergenic. A specific protein in milk known as beta-lactoglobulin is able to initiate an allergy only when being devoid of iron. Loaded with...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Women professors are asked to serve on university committees in such disproportionate numbers that they are deprived of research time that is essential for promotion and find their careers lagging behind their male colleagues as a result....
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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The post-Sandy deployment of nurses to help address patient surge in eight local hospitals and health facilities had an impact that has not been well studied since the storm. A new research study is one of only a few to evaluate the psychological toll...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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For many people, finding motivation to exercise is a challenge. Thankfully, there are Zombies chasing you. At least that's the approach of Zombies, Run! -- one of more than 31,000 health and fitness apps on the market today, and one of the growing number...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Calcium build-up in the coronary artery walls was more useful for correctly predicting kidney disease patients' risk of heart disease than other measures of atherosclerosis, such as thickness of the carotid artery walls and narrowing of the arteries...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Bridges become an infrastructure problem as they get older, as de-icing salt and carbon dioxide gradually destroy the reinforced concrete. A new robot can now check the condition of these structures, even in places that people cannot reach....
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Anyone who has suffered an injury can probably remember the after-effects, including pain, swelling or redness. These are signs that the body is fighting back against the injury. When tissue in the body is damaged, biological programs are activated to...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Researchers have recorded the first direct observations of how facets form and develop on platinum nanocubes in solution, pointing the way towards more sophisticated and effective nanocrystal design and revealing that a nearly 150 year-old scientific...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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Research will look to produce compound derivatives of punicalagin for a drug that would treat neuro-inflammation and slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease, scientists report. The onset of Alzheimer's disease can be slowed and some of its symptoms...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Nanometer-scale gold particles are intensively investigated for application as catalysts, sensors, drug delivery devices, biological contrast agents and components in photonics and molecular electronics. Gaining knowledge of their atomic-scale structures,...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Researchers have pinpointed the environmental source of fungal infections that have been sickening HIV/AIDS patients in Southern California for decades. It literally grows on trees. The discovery is based on the science project of a 13-year-old girl,...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Although touted as zero-emissions vehicles, most fuel cell vehicle run on hydrogen made from natural gas. Now scientists have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis. Unlike...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Scientists recently published the genome of Brassica napus -- commonly known as canola -- in the journal Science. Their discovery paves the way for improved versions of the plant, which is used widely in farming and industry....
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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A new species of carnivorous crustacean has been identified, which roamed the seas 435 million years ago, grasping its prey with spiny limbs before devouring it....
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Scientists have characterized a new class of materials called protein crystalline frameworks. Thanks to certain helper substances, in PCFs proteins are fixated in a way so as to align themselves symmetrically, forming highly stable crystals....
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Sticking to a general rule of pouring just a half glass of wine limits the likelihood of overconsumption, researchers report. "It is essential for all drinkers, especially men of higher BMIs, to have a rule of thumb for self-serving, because eye-balling...
From: Science Daily | Friday, August 22, 2014
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Ever heard of the water window? It consists of radiations in the 3.3 to 4.4 nanometer range, which are not absorbed by the water in biological tissues. A new theoretical study identifies the physical mechanism needed to efficiently generate harmonic...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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In the near future, the package that you ordered online may be deposited at your doorstep by a drone: Last December, online retailer Amazon announced plans to explore drone-based delivery, suggesting that fleets of flying robots might serve as autonomous...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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Thanks to effective vaccination, polio is considered nearly eradicated. Each year only a few hundred people are stricken worldwide. However, scientists are reporting alarming findings: a mutated virus that was able to resist the vaccine protection to...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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A novel and versatile modeling strategy has been developed to simulate polyelectrolyte systems. The model has applications for creating new materials as well as for studying polyelectrolytes, including DNA and RNA. Polyelectrolytes are chains of molecules...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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A copper awl, the oldest metal object found to date in the Middle East, has been discovered during the excavations at Tel Tsaf. The awl dates back to the late 6th millennium or the early 5th millennium BCE, moving back by several hundred years the date...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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A new role for the protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in suppressing colorectal cancer -- the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. -- has been outlined by new research, providing a better understanding of the illness. "It's...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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A recent study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns,...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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Humans are increasingly dependent on algae to suck up climate-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sink it to the bottom of the ocean. Now, by using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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New research outlines the possible coping mechanisms that might be needed following loss or theft of one's smart phone or other digital devices and the security problems that the user might face....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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The moon appears to be a tranquil place, but new modeling suggests that, over the eons, periodic storms of solar energetic particles may have significantly altered the properties of the soil in the moon's coldest craters through the process of sparking...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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Scientists have replicated one of the crucial steps in photosynthesis, opening the way for biological systems powered by sunlight which could manufacture hydrogen as a fuel....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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A group of researchers has succeeded in revealing a principle mechanism of a neural network in the human brain, which will provide an important clue to potential treatments for absence seizures. Absence seizures are believed to be elicited by T-type...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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Insulin can protect the cells of the pancreas from acute pancreatitis -- a disease for which there is currently no treatment -- researchers report. Acute pancreatitis involves the pancreas digesting itself resulting in severe abdominal pain, vomiting...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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Three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes, researchers have found. Their finding suggests that, if taken at higher-than-approved doses and/or for long periods of time, these prescription-level...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, August 21, 2014
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