Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
An engineering research team has invented a new transistor that could revolutionize thin-film electronic devices.Their findings could open the door to the development of flexible electronic devices with applications as wide-ranging as display technology...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Babies born to mothers exposed to air pollution from traffic during pregnancy have an increased risk of developing asthma before the age of six.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Barley can rapidly improve people's health by reducing blood sugar levels and the risk for diabetes, a recent study shows. The secret lies in the special mixture of dietary fibers found in barley, which can also help reduce people's appetite and risk...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Patients with complete unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate (U/BCLP) who were treated with nasoalveolar molding (NAM) required fewer surgeries and a reduction in overall healthcare costs compared to similar patients who did not have NAM treatment,...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Largest quantitative study of howling, and first to use machine learning, defines different howl types and finds that wolves use these types more or less depending on their species, resembling a howling dialect. Researchers say findings could help conservation...
From: Science Daily | Monday, February 8, 2016
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Researchers have new insight into the complex interchange that can raise blood levels of unhealthy lipids, or fat, in type 1 diabetes, and early evidence that a drug under study to block cancer cell growth can restore healthier levels.
From: Science Daily | Monday, February 8, 2016
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Type 2 diabetes accounts for around 90 percent of diabetes cases as well as being one of the major cardiovascular risk factors. Researchers have found an epigenetic mechanism implicated in the regulation of blood sugar. The results of this work could...
From: Science Daily | Monday, February 8, 2016
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South Africa's Australopithecus sediba, discovered in 2008 at the renowned archaeological site of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, is again helping us to study and understand the origins of humans. Research published in 2012 garnered...
From: Science Daily | Monday, February 8, 2016
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Rechargeable lithium metal batteries offer energy storage capabilities far superior to today’s workhorse lithium-ion technology that powers our smartphones and laptops. But these batteries are not in common use today because, when recharged, they spontaneously...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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In bloodhounds and neutrophils, getting the scent is not enough. Dogs and immune cells have to remember the chemoattractant they are pursuing, even when it momentarily fades out or threatens to overwhelm.
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Modern men increasingly value brains over beauty when choosing long-term mates, say researchers. While the common view is that our mate choices are evolutionarily "hardwired" in our brains and therefore minimally responsive to changing conditions, some...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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A geologic event known as diking can cause strong earthquakes -- with a magnitude between 6 and 7, according to an international research team. Diking can occur all over the world but most often occurs in areas where Earth's tectonic plates are moving...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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The human fingertip is a finely tuned sensory machine, and even slight touches convey a great deal of information about our physical environment. It turns out, some fish use their pectoral fins in pretty much the same way. And do so through a surprisingly...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Statin drugs interact with a gap junction protein called GJC3 that releases ATP, a major signaling molecule for inflammation in the body, new research shows. This discovery provides a significant new target in the search for why statin drugs can sometimes...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Boxer Muhammad Ali famously declared his intent to 'float like a butterfly and sting like a bee,' but perhaps boxers should look to another type of insect for inspiration: the trap-jaw ant. In a new study, entomologists measured the speed at which different...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Understanding the complex geological processes that form supervolcanoes could ultimately help geologists determine what triggers their eruptions. A new study using an advanced computer model casts doubt on previously held theories about the Yellowstone...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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The age at which an adolescent begins using marijuana may affect typical brain development, according to researchers. Scientists describe how marijuana use, and the age at which use is initiated, may adversely alter brain structures that underlie higher...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Beliefs about all-knowing, punishing gods -- a defining feature of religions ranging from Christianity to Hinduism -- may have played a key role in expanding co-operation among far-flung peoples and led to the development of modern-day states.
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Atomic clock experts have built an optical single-ion clock which attains an accuracy which had only been predicted theoretically so far. Their optical ytterbium clock achieved a relative systematic measurement uncertainty of 3 E-18.
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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A scientific breakthrough gives researchers access to the blueprint of thousands of molecules of great relevance to medicine and biology. The novel technique, opens up an easy way to determine the spatial structures of proteins and other molecules, many...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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The ultimate goal of evolutionary biology is to understand how mutations in DNA shape the growth and behavior of all living things. Standard research tools facilitate genetic studies of closely related individuals -- for example, the variation of lactose...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Public concerns about Zika have triggered scientists to write a new Extension document to explain the virus. Meanwhile, state mosquito control agencies and the Florida Department of Health monitor local areas for diseases and for these mosquito species....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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The whooping crane, with its snowy white plumage and trumpeting call, is one of the most beloved American birds, and one of the most endangered. As captive-raised cranes are re-introduced in Louisiana, they are gaining a new descriptor: natural killer....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Poor visual working memory can play an important role in the struggles experienced by autistic children, according to a new study. The aim of this study was to compare the working memory profiles of autistic children with typically developing children....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Physicians use different definitions of "reasonable medical certainty" when testifying as expert witnesses in child abuse cases. The variability is troubling because it could result in flawed rulings, according to researchers.
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Researchers report an estimated 12.5 percent of adults living in the United States use marijuana, but this research also shows that the rate of pot use did not double from 2002 to 2013 — as had been reported in the fall — but instead increased by...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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A clever means of localizing and confining enzymes and the substrate molecules they bind with has been presented by researchers, speeding up reactions essential for life processes.
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients from the contemporary treatment era remain at risk for attention and learning problems later, researchers report. ALL is the most common childhood cancer and among the most curable. The study involved...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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The Roman Emperors used to spend their summers in the city of Baia, near Naples. With the passage of time, however, the majority of their luxury villas became immersed under water. Italian and Spanish researchers have now applied microscopic and geochemical...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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The enzyme Dicer processes RNA transcripts, cutting them into short segments that regulate the synthesis of specific proteins. A research team has shown that Dicer promotes the development of atherosclerosis, thus identifying a new drug target.
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Planes flying between Europe and North America will be spending more time in the air due to the effects of climate change, a new study has shown.
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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For the first time horses have been shown to be able to distinguish between angry and happy human facial expressions.
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Scientists have recently discovered that for girls who are carriers of a particular gene variant (DRD4 VNTR with 7 repeats), the crucial element that influences a child's fat intake is not the gene variant itself. Instead, it is the interplay between...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Alexander Hamilton, Benjamin Franklin, Hubert Humphrey and some guy named "Thomas Moore" are among the names that many Americans mistakenly identify as belonging to a past president of the United States, finds a news study by memory researchers.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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The long-term damage of levees can be far worse for those living behind them than if those levees were not there, a case study of the Sny Island levee district found.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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In the first study to examine the severity of LGBT bullying over time and its impact on mental health, researchers found that while most LGBT teens are experiencing relief in bullying, about a third are experiencing severe victimizations. This harassment...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Status epilepticus -- continuous or rapid sequential seizure activity for 30 minutes or more -- is a medical emergency with a high mortality rate in both children and adults. Prompt and effective treatment is key; therefore the American Epilepsy Society...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Hundreds of hidden nearby galaxies have been studied for the first time, shedding light on a mysterious gravitational anomaly dubbed the Great Attractor. Despite being just 250 million light years from Earth, the new galaxies had been hidden from view...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Cancer patients who miss two or more radiation therapy sessions have a worse outcome than fully compliant patients, investigators have found. The study evaluated 1,227 patients scheduled for courses of external beam radiation therapy for cancers of the...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Seismologists studying a massive crack in the ground that appeared north of Menominee, Michigan in 2010 now think they know what the unusual feature might be.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Bombus occidentalis used to be the most common bumble bee species in the Pacific Northwest, but in the mid 1990s it became one of the rarest. Now, according to a new article it may be making a comeback.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Millennials face significant hurdles in their quest for homeownership, said a professor of agricultural and consumer economics and co-author of a new paper examining homeownership trends among those born between 1980-2000.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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In injured mouse intestines, specific types of bacteria step forward to promote healing, scientists have found. Potentially, some of these microbes could be exploited as treatments for conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, they say.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Engineers are combining the tools of biology and chemistry to create new biorenewable products.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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An international team of scientists has produced a 'structural movie' revealing the step-by-step creation of an important naturally occurring chemical in the body that plays a role in some cancers.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Diatoms are single-celled algae organisms, around 30 to 100 millionths of a meter in diameter, that are ubiquitous throughout the oceans. These creatures are encased within a hard shell shaped like a wide, flattened cylinder -- like a tambourine -- that...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Researchers have successfully identified how certain genes can contribute towards a person's susceptibility to stress fracture injuries. This research provides a platform for further research into providing a personalized health approach to this common...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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The first robotically driven experimentation system to determine the effects of a large number of drugs on many proteins, reducing the number of necessary experiments by 70 percent, has been created by scientists.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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Among older men with heart attack, heart failure or pneumonia, hospitalization at Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, compared with hospitalization at non-VA hospitals, was associated with lower 30-day all-cause mortality rates for heart attack and heart...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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China's new efforts to price carbon could lower the country's carbon dioxide emissions significantly without impeding economic development over the next three decades, new research indicates.
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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