Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
Patients who are obese, diabetic or both have the highest incidence of brain tumors, and they offer a clue that insulin is a factor for some glioblastoma patients. But a new study suggests drugs tested on such tumors targeted the wrong molecules....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Among soft-bodied cephalopods, vampire squid live life at a slower pace. At ocean depths from 500 to 3,000 meters, they don't swim so much as float, and they get by with little oxygen while consuming a low-calorie diet of zooplankton and detritus. Now,...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
"Listen to your heart," sang Swedish pop group Roxette in the late Eighties. But not everyone is able to tune into their heartbeat, according to an international team of researchers -- and half of us under- or over-estimate our ability....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, April 21, 2015
smile
frown
The results come from the first ever large study to compare mindfulness-based therapy – structured training for the mind and body which aims to change the way people think and feel about their experiences – with maintenance antidepressant medication...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, April 21, 2015
smile
frown
A map shows how California's state highway system is strewn with roadkill "hot spots," which are identified in a newly released report. The data could help state highway planners take measures to protect both drivers and wildlife....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
A new guideline found that administering an antiepileptic medication immediately after a first seizure reduces the risk of having another seizure within two years....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Using advanced technology, scientists have uncovered evidence that challenges one of the most widespread techniques in biology.
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
New analysis of world-famous 3.46-billion-year-old rocks is set to finally resolve a long running evolutionary controversy. The new research shows that structures once thought to be Earth's oldest microfossils do not compare with younger fossil candidates...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
New findings hidden within the complex machinery behind the chronic inflammation-cancer feedback loop have been discerned.
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Extending the dose of natalizumab from four weeks up to eight weeks was shown to be well-tolerated and effective in patients, and resulted in no cases of the potentially fatal side effect progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, researchers report....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
The structure of two closely related protein pumps that allow bacteria to resist certain medications has been described by scientists in new articles. The studies reveal that when the bacteria detect the antibiotic sulfonamide, "they turn on these transporters...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
A new combination of drugs has been developed that may overcome treatment resistance and relapse in breast cancer. While most women initially respond well to hormonal treatment with drugs such as tamoxifen, many go on to develop resistance and relapse....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
More than a third of New Jersey high school students who engage in indoor tanning do so frequently and many would find it hard to stop the practice. Investigators also found that frequent indoor tanners were more likely to smoke and to engage in social...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
A bundled intervention focused on evidence-based infection prevention practices, safety culture and teamwork, and scheduled measurement of infection rates considerably reduced central line-associated bloodstream infections across intensive care units...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), new research has found. They also identified possible triggers for PTSD and indicated a potential preventive strategy: having patients keep ICU diaries....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Before Deepwater Horizon, scientists didn't know that oil and marine snow had anything to do with each other. "Marine snow is like dust bunnies in the house," explained a research scientist who has studied the phenomenon for a long time. "All the gunk...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Scientists are coming to grips with the superior grasping ability of humans and other primates throughout history. In a new study, a research team found that even the oldest known human ancestors may have had precision grip capabilities comparable to...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Genomic studies have illuminated the ways in which malfunctioning genes can drive cancer growth while stunting the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy and other treatments. But new findings indicate that these genes are only partly to blame for why treatment...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Only three wolves seem to remain in Isle Royale National Park. Researchers observed the wolves during their annual Winter Study, and the lone group, at an unprecedented low, is a sharp decline from nine wolves observed last winter....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Although the media often portray the Arctic as a new 'Great Game' ripe for conflict, a group of international Arctic experts has released recommendations aimed at preserving the polar north as an area for political and military cooperation, sustainable...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Although global efforts to cut tobacco use have had some success, more can be done to reduce the number of deaths from smoking, according to a new commentary. More than 170 countries have signed the World Health Organization's (WHO) Framework Convention...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Pets can pass diseases to humans, especially when a pet owner's immune system is compromised. Here, veterinarians outline ways for families to avoid disease transmission by choosing the right type of pet--or making small changes in the ways they enjoy...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Ocean and Earth Science researchers reveal how the interplay between ocean currents and marine microbiology serve to regulate potentially damaging emissions of the potent greenhouse gas methane, created beneath the Arctic Ocean....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
New apps developed for children come online every day and many of them are marketed or labeled as 'educational' -- but how can we tell which of these thousands of apps will actually help children learn? In a comprehensive new report, a team of researchers...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Researchers have discovered a way to easily and effectively fasten proteins to nanoparticles -- essentially an arranged marriage -- by simply mixing them together. The biotechnology is in its infancy. But it already has shown promise for developing an...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Higher-than-expected rates of pediatric cancers have been identified in the Miami metro area and an area west of the Everglades in a series of five statistical analyses. Comparisons across analyses reveal characteristics of the detected patterns, including...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Poor quality medicines are an urgent threat that could undermine decades of successful efforts to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and TB, according to experts. Scientists report up to 41 percent of specimens failed to meet quality standards in global studies...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Despite strong evidence and guidelines supporting its use, post-surgical radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients at risk of recurrence is declining in the United States. This study finds fewer than 10 percent of patients at risk of recurrence...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
In a groundbreaking achievement, scientists have decoded the intricately woven genetic makeup of Upland cotton for the first time in the ancient plant's history. Upland cotton, which accounts for more than 90 percent of cultivated cotton worldwide and...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
New research into how tendons age has found that the material between tendon fiber bundles stiffens as it gets older and that this is responsible for older people being more susceptible to tendon injuries....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
The growth in the number of English language learners in US schools is placing new burdens on teachers who may not have the training to help these students. A new writing curriculum shows it helps teachers improve literacy skill building in elementary...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis. The hereditary disorder, which appears in early childhood, had never been diagnosed...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
For a magnetic thin film deposited onto a transition metal oxide film, the magnetic properties change dramatically as the oxide undergoes a structural phase transition. The hybrid between a simple magnetic material and a transition-metal oxide provides...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Scientists have found a novel avenue for therapeutic intervention of the "silent cancer." A new research study has shown that pancreatic cancer cells can be coaxed to revert back toward normal cells by introducing a protein called E47. E47 binds to specific...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
A rigorous analysis of antimalarial drug quality conducted in Cambodia and Tanzania found no evidence of fake medicines, according to new research. Previous reports had suggested that up to one third of antimalarials could be fake. Researchers analysed...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
The kwongan is a type of bushland that is only found in South-West Australia and is exceptionally rich in terms of biodiversity, despite existing on some of the most infertile soils in the world. Its unique nature enabled the researchers to discover...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
While the female baboon's big red bottom may be an eyesore to some, it has an aphrodisiac effect on her mates. Biologists have long thought that baboon males prefer females with bigger backsides as the mark of a good mother, but a new study reveals that...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
The discovery of a gene involved in determining the melting point of cocoa butter -- a critical attribute of the substance widely used in foods and pharmaceuticals -- will likely lead to new and improved products, according to researchers....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
A team of researchers has established a theoretical framework to understand the elastic and electronic properties of graphene. Graphene, a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb-like lattice, is one of the simplest materials...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Only 9 percent of US academic medical practices have procedures for connecting patients to LGBT-competent physicians, and only 4 percent had policies for identifying those physicians. In addition, only 15 percent had lists of LGBT-competent physicians,...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Leaders of an ongoing pancreatic cancer clinical trial known as the Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy or 'IMPaCT' trial, have been learning ways to bring about about a new paradigm of personalized cancer care for pancreatic cancer and...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
As two galaxies enter the final stages of merging, scientists have theorized that the galaxies' supermassive black holes will form a 'binary,' or two black holes in such close orbit they are gravitationally bound to one another. In a new study, astronomers...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Human emotion can be transferred by technology that stimulates different parts of the hand without making physical contact with your body, a study has shown. For example, short, sharp bursts of air to the area around the thumb, index finger and middle...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Researchers have reported that the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene promoter was altered in 69 percent of 54 cases of bladder cancer. Telomerase reverse transcriptase alterations frequently co-occur with alterations in recently identified bladder...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
The search for genes that contribute to the risk for autism has made tremendous strides over the past 3 years. As this field has advanced, investigators have wondered whether the diversity of clinical features across patients with autism reflects heterogeneous...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
There is both risk and reward in focusing Alzheimer's disease research on inhibiting amyloid production, according to a new article. The article reviews the significant body of research proposing that the accumulation of beta amyloid in the brain is...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Microalgae offer a highly promising alternative to petroleum products without competing for resources used in the food industry. They have now been used for the first time to make asphalt. Researchers have proven the viability of bioasphalt, demonstrating...
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Researchers have succeeded in light-controlled molecule switching. Scientists are working on storing and processing information on the level of single molecules to create the smallest possible components that will combine autonomously to form a circuit....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
Cells of the vascular system of vertebrates can fuse with themselves. This process, which occurs when a blood vessel is no longer necessary and pruned, has now been described on the cellular level by researchers....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown
A protein produced by nerve cells appears to be elevated in the blood of those with an aggressive form of neuroblastoma. The finding could potentially lead to a prognostic test for the disease or be used to monitor its progress....
From: Science Daily | Monday, April 20, 2015
smile
frown