Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
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What to do:
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  2. Click smileys and frownies
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A biomarker has been discovered that could give expecting mothers and their doctors the first simple blood test to reliably predict that a pregnant woman may develop preeclampsia, at least as early as six weeks into the pregnancy. Preeclampsia is a cardiovascular...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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Scientists have reviewed chemists' work on "singlet fission," a process in which a single photon generates a pair of excited states. This conversion process has the potential to boost solar cell efficiency by as much as 30 percent....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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Increasing the cost-effectiveness of photovoltaic devices is critical to making these renewable energy sources competitive with traditional fossil fuels. One possibility is to use hybrid solar cells that combine silicon nanowires with low-cost, photoresponsive...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a young age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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In the UK, about 50 pregnant and postnatal women develop life-threatening severe maternal sepsis (infection of the blood or 'blood poisoning') for every woman who dies from the condition, according to a new study. The study also suggests that signs of...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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A surprising new role has been found for a pair of compounds that have the potential to alter circadian rhythm, the complex physiological process, present in most living things, that responds to a 24-hour cycle of light and dark. At least one of these...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, July 8, 2014
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Pregnant women are using the Internet to seek answers to their medical questions more often than they would like, say researchers.
From: Science Daily | Monday, July 7, 2014
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Dating during the teen years takes a violent turn for nearly 1 in 6 young people, a new study finds, with both genders reporting acts like punching and throwing things. The data, drawn from a survey of over 4,000 patients ages 14 to 20, indicate that...
From: Science Daily | Monday, July 7, 2014
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For more than a half-century, NASA has made the stuff of science fiction into reality. Researchers are continuing that tradition by designing robots to work in a deep-space habitat, tending gardens and growing food for astronaut explorers. It sounds...
From: Science Daily | Monday, July 7, 2014
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A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometers across that could pave the way for extremely high-resolution and low-energy thin, flexible displays for applications such as 'smart' glasses, synthetic retinas, and...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Solar panels need sun. Wind turbines need wind. Society needs ways to store and dispense alternative energy. Fuel cells could do this. But their chemical reactions are not fully understood. Researchers have studied a high-efficiency solid-oxide fuel...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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It is possible to relieve pain hypersensitivity using a new method that involves rekindling pain so that it can subsequently be erased, a study by two neuroscientists shows. This discovery could lead to novel means to alleviate chronic pain. The scientists...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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If you think of your next workout as a 'fun run' or as a well-deserved break, you'll eat less afterward, research has shown. However, if you think of it as exercise or as a workout you'll later eat more dessert and snacks, to reward yourself. For beginning...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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For the first time, in response to the public’s increased interest in being part of discoveries in astronomy, the International Astronomical Union is organizing a worldwide contest to give popular names to selected exoplanets along with their host...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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In some countries, a region that can lay claim to being the birthplace of a country's political leader is likely to get preferential treatment -- bias that shines out when the intensity of night lights is compared with that in other regions. Using information...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Mice lacking a specific component of the immune system are completely resistant to sepsis, a potentially fatal complication of infection, molecular microbiologists report. The discovery suggests that blocking this immune system component may help reduce...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Although feelings are personal and subjective, the human brain turns them into a standard code that objectively represents emotions across different senses, situations and even people, reports a new study. “Despite how personal our feelings feel, the...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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When a superconductor is exposed to a magnetic field, a current on its surface appears which creates a counter field that cancels the magnetic field inside the superconductor. This phenomenon, known as "Meissner-Ochsenfeld effect" after its discoverers,...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Many buildings in Germany are in need of renovation. The reasons for this are often aging building structures and environmental influences. In the future, flying inspection robots will be able to accelerate and simplify inspections, thus reducing the...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Scientists have taken the first snapshots of photosynthesis in action as it splits water into protons, electrons and oxygen, the process that maintains Earth's oxygen atmosphere. The revealing of the mechanism of this water splitting process is essential...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Low-fat wieners made with olive oil rather than pork fat make progress toward a healthful alternative hot dog without sacrificing satisfying flavor and texture....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Studying the most common type of lung cancer, researchers have uncovered mutations in a cell-signaling pathway that plays a role in forming tumors. The new knowledge may expand treatments for patients because drugs targeting some of these genetic changes...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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There is an increased risk of severe perineal tearing during childbirth in women who had such a tear in a previous delivery, suggests a new study. Most women tear to some extent during childbirth and in some women the tear may be more extensive. The...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Scientists have recreated the walking gait of a 410-million-year-old arachnid, one of the first predators on land, based on fossil evidence. The scientists used the fossils -- thin slices of rock showing the animal's cross-section -- to work out the...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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The migration of tropical fish as a result of ocean warming poses a serious threat to the temperate areas they invade, because they overgraze on kelp forests and seagrass meadows, a new study concludes. The harmful impact is most evident in southern...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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It may smell of flatulence and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Reactive astrocytes, which have been commonly observed in Alzheimer's patients, aberrantly and abundantly produce the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and release it through the Best1 channel, researchers have discovered. The released GABA strongly...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Among adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, the likelihood of having cavities decreased as the number of years receiving dental care increased, researchers report. "Based on these results, patients had a significant decrease in cavities....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Although telemedicine could improve the quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases, viable home care systems are still lacking. Scientists working on the EU-project “d-LIVER” mean to remedy this situation....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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An ongoing survey of Ontario students in grades seven to 12 reveals a number of significant behavioral trends, including an alarming number of young people who are texting while driving. More than 80 per cent of students visit social media sites daily,...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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A ‘Herculean study’ into malaria parasite development is completed – bringing scientists closer to disrupting the life-cycle of this highly efficient parasite. Scientists searching for new drug and vaccine targets to stop transmission of one of...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Small print and poor printing on prescription labels handed out by pharmacists may be misread and may lead to errors in taking medication, according to new research. By simply following recommended guidelines for font size, use of bolding, justification,...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Previous studies linking older age with kidney and heart disease have raised concerns about the safety of living kidney donation among older adults. However, in the first study to look closely at this issue, researchers report that older kidney donors...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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With over 100 diseases that can attack soybean crops, why would charcoal rot rise to the top of the most wanted list? Scientists cite the earth’s changing climate as one reason that more research is needed on the fungus that causes charcoal rot. Fungi...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Chemists have made a decisive step towards more cost-efficient regenerative fuel cells and rechargeable metal-air batteries. They developed a new type of catalyst on the basis of carbon, which can facilitate two opposite reactions: electrolysis of water...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Adolescents in southern Europe are less fit in terms of cardiorespiratory capacity, strength and speed-agility than their central-northern European peers. Moreover, southern adolescents are more obese and present higher levels of total and abdominal...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Circuits in the brain involved in pursuing and relishing rewarding experiences are more strongly activated in people with bipolar disorder, guiding them towards riskier gambles and away from safer ones, researchers report. The study used brain imaging...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Researchers studying critically ill children with traumatic injuries have identified an immune marker that predicts which patients are likely to develop a hospital-acquired infection. The study is part of several larger efforts that could lead to the...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Experts are now able to save patients from potentially fatal outcomes from blood clots, infected masses or foreign bodies from major cardiac blood vessels without performing open-heart surgery. The AngioVac is a catheter-based device in which thin tubes...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Working with a gene involved in HIV infection, researchers discovered some human genes have an alternate set of operating instructions written into their protein-making machinery, which can quickly alter the proteins' contents, functions and ability...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Bowel cancer patients with high levels of vitamin D in their blood are more likely to survive the disease, a study shows. Patients with the highest levels of vitamin D have half the risk of dying compared with those with the lowest levels, the findings...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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No admission for bacteria: Scientists have succeeded in preventing Pseudomonas bacteria from entering host cells with the help of a sugar complex that binds the bacterial protein LecA. This protein enables the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa to invade...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Highly efficient holography has been developed based on nanoantennas, using the parameters of light itself to create dynamic and complex holographic images. This research could be used for security as well as medical and recreational purposes, improving...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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There are billions of stars and planets in the universe. The planets are formed in dust clouds that swirled around a newly formed star. But where does the cosmic dust come from? New research shows that not only can grains of dust form in gigantic supernova...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics -- and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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There has been a sharp increase in the number of cancer patients at one hospital using MyChart, the online, interactive service that allows patients to view laboratory and radiology results, communicate with their healthcare providers, and more. MyChart...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Quasiparticles can be used to explain physical phenomena in solid bodies even though they are not actual physical particles. Physicists have now realized quasiparticles in a quantum system and observed quantum mechanical entanglement propagation in a...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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Children who live on farms that produce milk run one-tenth the risk of developing allergies as other rural children. According to researchers, pregnant women may benefit from spending time on dairy farms to promote maturation of the fetal and neonatal...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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While researchers have long known that brothers and sisters teach each other about the world, most of their observations about this have been made in a lab setting. A new study has investigated a step further by observing how children interact in their...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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A new study shows that some shark species may be able to cope with the rising salinity of Arctic waters that may come with rising temperatures. The Arctic is of special interest today because it is increasing in temperature at twice the global rate....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 9, 2014
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