Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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In individuals living in the Arctic, researchers have discovered a genetic variant that arose thousands of years ago and likely provided an evolutionary advantage for processing high-fat diets or for surviving in a cold environment; however, the variant...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Using extremely faint light from galaxies 10.8-billion light years away, scientists have created one of the most complete, three-dimensional maps of a slice of the adolescent universe. The map shows a web of hydrogen gas that varies from low to high...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Sleep difficulties -- particularly problems with falling asleep -- were very common among toddlers and preschool-aged children who were receiving clinical treatment for a wide range of psychiatric disorders, a study has found. "This study is a great...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Personalized nutrition based on an individual's genotype - nutrigenomics - could have a major impact on reducing lifestyle-linked diseases such as obesity, heart disease and Type II diabetes, experts say. However, a study of more than 9,000 volunteers...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, October 21, 2014
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An infant's preference for a person's face, rather than an object, is associated with lower levels of callous and unemotional behaviors in toddlerhood, scientists have found. Callous and unemotional behaviours include a lack of guilt and empathy, reduced...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents with behavioral and emotional problems, a study has found.
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Supplements of the fatty acids omega 3 and 6 can help children and adolescents who have a certain kind of ADHD. New research also indicates that a special cognitive training program can improve problem behavior in children with ADHD....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Family conflict and problems at school tend to occur together on the same day. A new study has found that these problems spill over in both directions for up to two days after. The study found that teens with more pronounced mental health symptoms, anxiety...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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The health risks and benefits of vegetarianism have long been discussed in relation to the human diet, but newly published research reveals that it’s definitely of benefit to the reptile population. That, and being less sexually active. The research...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Teens whose parents exerted psychological control over them at age 13 had problems establishing healthy friendships and romantic relationships both in adolescence and into adulthood, a new longitudinal study has found. The study followed 184 ethnically...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Ecologists working in central Pennsylvania forests have found that forest top soils capture and stabilize the powerful fertilizer nitrogen quickly, within days, but release it slowly, over years to decades. The discrepancy in rates means that nitrogen...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Researchers have devised an ultra-thin LCD screen that operates without a power source, making it a compact, energy-efficient way to display visual information. The technology may one day have applications in products such as e-book readers, flexible...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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A new study provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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People can eat potatoes and still lose weight, a new study demonstrates. The study sought to gain a better understanding of the role of calorie reduction and the glycemic index in weight loss when potatoes are included in the diet. “Some people have...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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Negative feelings about one's own weight, known as internalized weight bias, influence the success people have after undergoing weight loss surgery, according to research. The study is considered the first and only study to examine internalized weight...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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Our immune system defends us from harmful bacteria and viruses, but, if left unchecked, the cells that destroy those invaders can turn on the body itself, causing auto-immune diseases like type-1 diabetes or multiple sclerosis. A molecule called insulin-like...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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A balloon-borne acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imager is ideally suited to address numerous outstanding questions in planetary science. Their spectral agility, narrowband wavelength selection, tolerance to the near-space environment, and...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Synthetic gene networks hold great potential for broad biotechnology and medical applications, but so far they have been limited to the lab. A study reveals a new method for using engineered gene circuits beyond the lab, allowing researchers to safely...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Designer proteins that expand on nature's own repertoire, created by a team of chemists and biochemists, are described in a new paper. Proteins are long linear molecules that fold up to form well-defined 3D shapes. These 3D molecular architectures are...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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How does a comet smell? Since early August the Rosetta Orbiter Sensor for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) is sniffing the fumes of the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko with its two mass spectrometers. The detected chemistry in the coma of the comet is surprisingly...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Engaging brain areas linked to so-called 'off-task' mental activities (such as mind-wandering and reminiscing) can actually boost performance on some challenging mental tasks, a new research led by a neuroscientist shows for the first....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Ferns are believed to be 'old' plant species -- some of them lived alongside the dinosaurs, over 200 million years ago. However, a group of Andean ferns evolved much more recently: their completely new form and structure (morphology) arose and diversified...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Simulating the behavior of a single particle can be quite a challenging task in physics; after all, it is microscopic and we usually cannot watch in real time. It becomes even more complicated when you realize that the particle has to follow the laws...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Despite a dramatic increase in public awareness and anti-bullying legislation nationwide, the prevalence of bullying is still one of the most pressing issues facing our nation's youth, according to a report....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings. According to the study, local oceanic conditions are believed to drive the evolution of some unique swimming behaviors....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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A shortened (four month) treatment for tuberculosis is well tolerated and may work well in subsets of tuberculosis patients, but overall could not be considered as an alternative to the current six month standard treatment, a clinical drug trial conducted...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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A new study that measured 'dispositional mindfulness' along with seven indicators of cardiovascular health found that persons reporting higher degrees of awareness of their present feelings and experiences had better health. The research suggests that...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Volatile rainstorms drive complex landscape changes in deserts, particularly in dryland channels, which are shaped by flash flooding. Paradoxically, such desert streams have surprisingly simple topography with smooth, straight and symmetrical form that...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Although it would seem logical that large numbers of roosting birds would attract more mosquitoes that carry West Nile virus and contract the disease when bitten, recent research has found the opposite to be true. That is, when large groups of birds...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Future prevention and treatment strategies for vascular diseases may lie in the evaluation of early brain imaging tests long before heart attacks or strokes occur, according to a systematic review conducted by a team of cardiologists, neuroscientists,...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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The nitrate in beetroot targets fast-twitch muscles, increasing the blood flow to muscles that receive less oxygen, researchers report. This can increase high-intensity athletic performance and improve quality of life of heart failure patients....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield, is a novel software tool that can automatically quantitate adenocarcinoma pulmonary nodule characteristics from non-invasive high resolution computed tomography images and stratify non-small cell lung...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Intonation is an integral part of communication for all speakers. But can sign languages have intonation? A new study shows that signers use their faces to create intonational ‘melodies’ just as speakers use their voices, and that the melodies of...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Small molecules that can represent a new class of anticancer drugs with a novel target for the treatment of lung cancer have been identified by an interdisciplinary team of researchers. "These compounds hold potential as an entirely new class of anticancer...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Several new components for biological circuits have been developed by researchers. These components are key building blocks for constructing precisely functioning and programmable bio-computers. "The ability to combine biological components at will in...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Successful techniques for cryopreserving bulk biomaterials and organ systems would transform current approaches to transplantation and regenerative medicine. However, while vitrified cryopreservation holds great promise, practical application has been...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species -- in as little as 15 years -- as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Space debris, also known as 'space junk,' is an ongoing real-life concern for teams managing satellites orbiting Earth, including NOAA-NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. It is not unusual for satellites that have the capability...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Federal Express and UPS are no match for the human body when it comes to distribution. There exists in cancer biology an impressive packaging and delivery system that influences whether your body will develop cancer or not, scientists say. Researchers...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Research conducted at the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites yet identified in the world sheds new light on the capacity of humans to survive in extreme environments. The findings were taken from sites in the Pucuncho Basin, located in...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Scientists have identified a key phenomenon in the triggering of solar flares. Using satellite data and models, the scientists were able to monitor the evolution of the solar magnetic field in a region with eruptive behavior. Their calculations reveal...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Experts have issued a 'Watch' regarding concerns over flexible reamer breakage during anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction. Flexible reamers help surgeons achieve optimal femoral-tunnel parameters, but they are prone to breakage in certain situations,...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Using a technique that illuminates subtle changes in individual proteins, chemistry researchers have uncovered new insight into the underlying causes of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Scientists will be testing technology developed in the International Space Station. The technology is based on intelligent materials that allow objects to be sent into orbit without the use of explosives....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Just like those of humans, insect guts are full of microbes, and the microbiota can influence the insect's ability to transmit diseases. A new study reports that a bacterium isolated from the gut of an Aedes mosquito can reduce infection of mosquitoes...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer, scientists have discovered....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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Astronomers have gotten the closest look yet at what happens when a black hole takes a bite out of a star—and the star lives to tell the tale.
From: Science Daily | Thursday, October 23, 2014
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