Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
Cyberbullying was associated with mental health and substance use problems in adolescents, a new study shows, but family dinners may help protect teens from the consequences of cyberbullying and also be beneficial for their mental health....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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The quality of the US diet showed some modest improvement in the last decade in large measure because of a reduction in the consumption of unhealthy trans fats, but the gap in overall diet quality widened between the rich and the poor....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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Female magpies have been shown to be more adventurous than their male siblings, according to new research. “The fact that observable differences between the first hatched and last hatched magpie’s behaviors exist indicates that mothers may be able...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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Bats emit ultrasound pulses and measure the echoes reflected from their surroundings. They have an extremely flexible internal navigation system that enables them to do this. A study shows that when a bat flies close to an object, the number of active...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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Alcohol use was more commonly reported to compromise relationships with friends and significant others (e.g., boyfriends), researchers studying its consequences report. It was also reported to lead to more regret, particularly among females. Marijuana...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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Healthier diets and reducing food waste are part of a combination of solutions needed to ensure food security and avoid dangerous climate change, say the team behind a new study....
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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One in 60 people over the age of 60 who had invisible blood in their urine -- identified by their GP testing their urine -- transpired to have bladder cancer, researchers report. The figure was around half of those who had visible blood in their urine...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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Television shows filled with action and sound may be bad for your waistline. TV viewers ate more M&Ms, cookies, carrots and grapes while watching an excerpt from a Hollywood action film than those watching an interview program....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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A fast-sensitive "electronic-nose" for sniffing the highly infectious bacteria C-diff, that causes diarrhea, temperature and stomach cramps, has been developed....
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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'Green' offices with plants make staff happier and more productive than 'lean' designs stripped of greenery, new research shows. The team examined the impact of 'lean' and 'green' offices on staff's perceptions of air quality, concentration, and workplace...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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Most plant fossils are isolated organs, making it difficult to reconstruct the type of plant life or its ecosystem structure. Botanists have now used leaf vein density, a trait visible on leaf compression fossils, to document the occurrence of stratified...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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Adoptions have been running at record levels in the UK, with recent figures showing an annual rate of almost 4,000 – up by 15 per cent – while Government reforms have attempted to boost the process. Now a researcher is investigating the long-term...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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Greenhouses have improved the possibilities of invasion of greenhouse whitefly into the wild in the boreal region, new study finds. Genetic analysis sheds new light on the survival of whiteflies in Finland and helps to plan efficient pest management. ...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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In patients who experienced an acute coronary syndrome event -- such as heart attack or unstable angina -- use of the drug darapladib to inhibit the enzyme lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 -- believed to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis...
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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Researchers have developed an alarm system for construction vehicles with a low-cost radar network that can prevent collisions and improve safety in work environments....
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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Conventional wisdom has long held that corals -- whose calcium-carbonate skeletons form the foundation of coral reefs -- are passive organisms that rely entirely on ocean currents to deliver dissolved substances, such as nutrients and oxygen. But now...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. A characteristic of neurons that extend into the skin and record touch, is that they branch in the skin so that each neuron reports touch from...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children. The test features...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research.
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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The human protein EGFR controls cell growth. It has mutated in case of many cancer cells or exists in excessive numbers. For this reason it serves as a point of attack for target-oriented therapies. A study group has now discovered that the risk of this...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what they do -- even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 1, 2014
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Drinking tea reduces non-cardiovascular mortality by 24 percent, reveals a study in 131,000 people. "Tea has antioxidants which may provide survival benefits. Tea drinkers also have healthier lifestyles so does tea drinking reflect a particular person...
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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Early, fast, turbulent mixing of gas within giant molecular clouds -- the birthplaces of stars -- means all stars formed from a single cloud bear the same unique chemical 'tag' or 'DNA fingerprint,' write astrophysicists. Could such chemical tags help...
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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According to a generally-accepted model of synaptic plasticity, a neuron that communicates with others of the same kind emits an electrical impulse as well as activating its synapses transiently. This electrical pulse, combined with the signal received...
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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A technique that can detect malarial parasite's waste in infected blood cells has been developed by researchers. "There is real potential to make this into a field-deployable system, especially since you don't need any kind of labels or dye. It's based...
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2cm more than the global average of 6cm. Researchers detected the rapid rise in sea-level...
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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Energy drinks can cause heart problems according to research. "So-called 'energy drinks' are popular in dance clubs and during physical exercise, with people sometimes consuming a number of drinks one after the other. This situation can lead to a number...
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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Wine only protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) in people who exercise, according to results from the a study. Evidence suggesting that mild to moderate consumption of wine protects against cardiovascular disease has been accumulating since the...
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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A new batteryless cardiac pacemaker based on an automatic wristwatch and powered by heart motion has been presented by researchers. The prototype device does not require battery replacement....
From: Science Daily | Sunday, August 31, 2014
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