Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
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What to do:
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  2. Click smileys and frownies
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Some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress, leading to diabetes and heart disease, a new genetic finding suggests. An estimated 13 percent of people, all of whom...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Having trouble getting pregnant -- even with in vitro fertilization? Here's some hope: A new research report explains how scientists developed a synthetic version of a sperm-originated protein which induced embryo development in human and mouse eggs...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Relational aggression, or 'mean girl' bullying, is a popular subject in news and entertainment media. This nonphysical form of aggression generally used among adolescent girls includes gossiping, rumor spreading, exclusion and rejection. As media coverage...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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A species of gut bacteria called Clostridium ramosum, coupled with a high-fat diet, may cause animals to gain weight, researchers report. They observed that mice harboring human gut bacteria including C. ramosum gained weight when fed a high-fat diet....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Preventing childhood obesity may begin at home, but there’s plenty nurses can do to help parents embrace healthy lifestyle choices, says one expert. For tips about diet and exercise to stick, clinicians need to take the time to interview families about...
From: Science Daily | Monday, September 29, 2014
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Researchers have uncovered the first-ever field-based evidence for a biological mechanism called 'group selection' contributing to local adaptation in natural populations. Evolutionary theorists have been debating the existence and power of group selection...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Observations of moulins (vertical conduits connecting water on top of the glacier down to the bed of the ice sheet) and boreholes in Greenland show that subglacial channels ameliorate the speedup caused by water delivery to the base of the ice sheet...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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A patient being treated at a Dallas hospital is the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, health officials announced yesterday. Now that the first case has been reported, what does this all mean for the rest of the country, and...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Though it seems simple, feeling that something is wet is quite a feat because our skin does not have receptors that sense wetness. UK researchers propose that wetness perception is intertwined with our ability to sense cold temperature and tactile sensations...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Scientists analyzing data from NASA's Cassini mission have discovered that a giant, toxic cloud is hovering over the south pole of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, after the atmosphere there cooled dramatically. The scientists found that this giant polar...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Sequencing the genomes of monarch butterflies from around the world, a team of scientists has made surprising new insights into the monarch's genetics. They identified a single gene that appears central to migration -- a behavior generally regarded as...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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To protect their gut microbes during illness, sick mice produce specialized sugars in the gut that feed their microbiota and maintain a healthy microbial balance. This protective mechanism also appears to help resist or tolerate additional harmful pathogens,...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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New insights into botulinum neurotoxins and their interactions with cells are moving scientists ever closer to safer forms of Botox and a better understanding of the dangerous disease known as botulism. By comparing all known structures of botulinum...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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A new nanostructure absorbs ultranarrow bands of light spectrum and can be used in a number of applications, including the creation of more sensitive biosensors....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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New data obtained by NASA's GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon -- a giant basin often referred to as the "man in the moon" -- likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Treatments for certain childhood cancers come with a high risk of sterility. A new research study for young boys is focused on fertility preservation and restoration....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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The inability of older adults to identify scents is a strong predictor of death within five years. Almost 40% of those who failed a smelling test died during that period, compared to 10% of those with a healthy sense of smell. Olfactory dysfunction predicted...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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People who are unable to button up their jacket or who find it difficult to insert a key in lock suffer from a condition known as apraxia. This means that their motor skills have been impaired -- as a result of a stroke, for instance. Scientists have...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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In a newly published analysis, the risk of high blood pressure among 5,400 post-menopausal women was higher the closer they lived to a major roadway. The result, which accounts for a wide variety of possible confounding factors, adds to concerns that...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Hospitals with aggressive treatment styles, also known as high hospital care intensity, had lower rates of patients dying from a major complication but longer hospitalizations....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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If a person is dually diagnosed with a severe mental illness and a substance abuse problem, are improvements in their mental health or in their substance abuse most likely to reduce the risk of future violence? A new study suggests that reducing substance...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Error-correcting codes are one of the glories of the information age: They're what guarantee the flawless transmission of digital information over the airwaves or through copper wire, even in the presence of the corrupting influences that engineers call...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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When scientists talk about the consequences of climate change, it can mean more than how we human beings will be impacted by higher temperatures, rising seas and serious storms. Plants and trees are also feeling the change, but they can't move out of...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Scientists studying the subtle transformations of subatomic particles called neutrinos, is publishing its first results on the search for a so-called sterile neutrino, a possible new type of neutrino beyond the three known neutrino 'flavors,' or types....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Contrary to the popular research-based assumption that the world's coral reefs are doomed, a new longitudinal study paints a brighter picture of how corals may fare in the future. A subset of present coral fauna will likely populate oceans as water temperatures...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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After 40 years of wondering why, scientists have discovered that duplicate genes confer 'mutational robustness' in individuals, which allows them to adapt to novel, potentially dangerous environments....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Patients with increased inflammation, including those receiving cytokines for medical treatment, have a greatly increased risk of depression. For example, a 6-month treatment course of interferon-alpha therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Secondary school students in Australia have helped reveal weird, jittery behavior in a pulsar called PSR J1717-4054. Pulsars are super-dense, highly magnetized balls of ‘neutron matter’ the size of a small city. They form when stars with more than...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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A pill coated with tiny needles can deliver drugs directly into the lining of the digestive tract, researchers have found, suggesting that the end of injections may be near....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Having the possibility to measure magnetic properties of materials at atomic precision is one of the important goals of today's experimental physics. Such measurement technique would give engineers and physicists an ultimate handle over magnetic properties...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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When appointing a new leader, selectors base their choice on several factors and typically look for leaders with desirable characteristics such as honesty and trustworthiness. However once leaders are in power, can we trust them to exercise it in a prosocial...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Scientists have discovered a new form of non-genetic inheritance, showing for the first time that offspring can resemble a mother's previous sexual partner -- in flies at least. Researchers manipulated the size of male flies and studied their offspring....
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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The Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile has taken this beautiful image, dappled with blue stars, of one of the most star-rich open clusters currently known -- Messier 11, also known as NGC 6705...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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More than one hundred and fifty years ago, Charles Darwin hypothesized that species could cross oceans and other vast distances on vegetation rafts, icebergs, or in the case of plant seeds, in the plumage of birds. Though many were skeptical of Darwin's...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Americans are more depressed now than they have been in decades, a recent study shows. Analyzing data from 6.9 million adolescents and adults from all over the country, researchers found that Americans now report more psychosomatic symptoms of depression,...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Electrical engineers have demonstrated a new kind of building block for digital integrated circuits. Their experiments show that future computer chips could be based on three-dimensional arrangements of nanometer-scale magnets instead of transistors....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission will deploy its lander, Philae, to the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Nov. 12. Philae's landing site, currently known as Site J, is located on the smaller of the comet's two "lobes," with a backup...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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In the first months of life, when babies begin to distinguish sounds that make up language from all the other sounds in the world, they can be trained to more effectively recognize which sounds “might” be language, accelerating the development of...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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A genetic disease called SCID -- short for severe combined immunodeficiency -- forces patients to breathe filtered air and avoid human contact because their bodies cannot fight germs. Now, using a mouse model, researchers describe a potential biomarker...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Geographically isolated wetlands can be connected in ways that are largely ignored, but that may be critically important for watershed storage and stabilizing downstream flows, researchers say. The connection between wetlands and federally protected...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Sequestration helps mitigate carbon-based gases from getting into the atmosphere. A new study shows Florida's warm, wet climate helps keep carbon in the soil. Soil-stored carbon can slow the build-up of carbon-based gases in the atmosphere, a phenomenon...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Administration of high-dose vitamin D3 compared with placebo did not reduce hospital length of stay, intensive care unit length of stay, hospital mortality, or the risk of death at 6 months among patients with vitamin D deficiency who were critically...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Coral reefs face a suite of perilous threats in today's ocean. From overfishing and pollution to coastal development and climate change, fragile coral ecosystems are disappearing at unprecedented rates. Despite this trend, some species of corals surrounding...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) mission has succeeded in producing a state of matter known as a Bose-Einstein condensate, a key breakthrough for the instrument leading up to its debut on the International Space Station in late 2016....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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New human antibody therapies have been developed for people exposed to the deadly Ebola and Marburg viruses, researchers report. Researchers are using a high-efficiency method to isolate and generate large quantities of human antibodies from the blood...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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A reaction pathway that could reduce the potentially harmful impact of diazepam and similar chemicals on the UK's freshwater environment has been discovered by researchers. Diazepam -- used to treat anxiety and other similar conditions -- has been detected...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Gender equality boosts a country's Olympic medal count for both women and men, shows a new study. Researchers compared a country's tendency toward sexual equality with its medal counts from the London 2012 Olympic Games and the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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When it comes to using marijuana, new research involving mice suggests that just because you can do it, doesn't mean that you should. That's because a team of scientists have found that using marijuana in adolescence may do serious long-term damage to...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Immunologists reveals new information about how our immune system functions, shedding light on a vital process that determines how the body's ability to fight infection develops....
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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Learning is based on the strengthening or weakening of the contacts between the nerve cells in the brain -- this has been the traditional understanding. However, this has been challenged by new research findings. These indicate that there is also a third...
From: Science Daily | Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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