Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

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Researchers have identified neural pathways that increase understanding of how the brain regulates body weight, energy expenditure, and blood glucose levels – a discovery that can lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes and obesity....
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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A protein that controls when genes are switched on or off plays a key role in specific areas of the brain to regulate metabolism, researchers have found. The research potentially could lead to new therapies to treat obesity and diabetes, since the transcription...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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New research outlines the path to a possible future for California in which renewable energy creates a healthier environment, generates jobs and stabilizes energy prices....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Computer scientists have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can analyze and compare musical styles, which they have used to study the musical progression of the Beatles....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Spinach gave Popeye super strength, but it also holds the promise of a different power for a group of scientists: the ability to convert sunlight into a clean, efficient alternative fuel. Physicists are using spinach to study the proteins involved in...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 23, 2014
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In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, p53 is activated in certain cells to adapt the metabolic response to nutrient deprivation, thus having a global effect on the organism, researchers show. The researchers also reveal the molecular mechanisms through...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Researchers argue that medicine focuses too much on fighting diseases individually instead of concentrating on interventions that prevent multiple chronic diseases and extend healthy lifespan. They call for moving forward with strategies that have been...
From: Science Daily | Wednesday, July 23, 2014
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A decline in overall potato consumption has breeders working on “designer” spuds that meet the time constraints and unique tastes of a younger generation.
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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A new emergency medicine system that sent patients to designated cardiac receiving centers dramatically increased the survival rate of victims of sudden cardiac arrest in Arizona, according to a study. Under the study, 31 hospitals, serving about 80...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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An experimental anti-inflammatory drug can protect vulnerable neurons and reduce motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease, a study has shown. The findings demonstrate that the drug, called XPro1595, can reach the brain at sufficient levels...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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A study involving nearly 27,000 older adults on five continents found that nearly 1 in 10 met criteria for pre-dementia based on a simple test that measures how fast people walk and whether they have cognitive complaints. People who tested positive for...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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A new study finds that resale markets like Craigslist can add value to tickets sold by concert venues and Ticketmaster.
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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Clinical judgement, combined with an electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood test on arrival, is effective in reducing unnecessary hospital admissions for chest pain, a new study shows. The findings of a research group could potentially make a huge difference...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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Early life experiences, such as childhood socioeconomic status and literacy, may have greater influence on the risk of cognitive impairment late in life than such demographic characteristics as race and ethnicity, a large study has found. "These findings...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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The routine use of a molecular testing panel increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for thyroid cancer patients by 30 percent, researchers report. "Before this test, about one in five potential thyroid cancer cases couldn't...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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Scientists have achieved an electrical current of 100,000 amperes, which is by far the highest in the world, by using the new idea of assembling the state-of-the-art yttrium-based high-temperature superconducting tapes to fabricate a large-scale magnet...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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While predicting the path of hurricanes has gotten better, little has been done to improve predicting a storm's intensity. That is, until now. "The air-water interface -- whether it had significant waves or significant spray -- is a big factor in storm...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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Less than 1% of research funding awarded by public and charitable bodies to UK researchers in 2008–13 was awarded for research on antibiotics, according to new research. The study, which is the first detailed assessment of public and charitable funding...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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A false positive screen result -- a screening test in which initial findings of concern for cancer are later found not to be worrisome -- did not cause participants undue anxiety or reduced quality of life, a new study shows. Researchers hypothesize...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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For the first time, researchers have detected an unknown interaction between microorganisms and salt. When Escherichia coli cells are introduced into a droplet of salt water that is left to dry, bacteria manipulate the sodium chloride crystallization...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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A new material structure generates steam by soaking up the sun. The structure -- a layer of graphite flakes and an underlying carbon foam -- is a porous, insulating material structure that floats on water. When sunlight hits the structure's surface,...
From: Science Daily | Friday, July 25, 2014
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Only 8.2 percent of human DNA is likely to be doing something important -- is 'functional' -- say researchers. This figure is very different from one given in 2012, when some scientists involved in the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) project stated...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery. This is just one of several recommendations made in a report published. Other factors that also affect admission...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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After weeks of the kids being out of school, some parents have had enough of their behavior and are counting the days until they go back. Some may also be wondering how much of the defiant behavior is normal and when it’s time to seek help....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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A new report outlines the total and state-specific medical and absenteeism costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among adults in the United States, and lays out some projections to 2020. Chronic lower respiratory diseases, including COPD, are...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared. Only a million years later, at Mexican Hat,...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Adding to the growing fundamental understanding of the machinery of muscle cells, a group of biophysicists describe -- in minute detail -- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study, these 'surprised losers' often have less trust in government and democracy....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Many people value rewards they choose themselves more than rewards they merely receive, even when the rewards are actually equivalent. A new study provides evidence that this long-observed quirk of behavior is a byproduct of how the brain reinforces...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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A yearlong study found that individual property owners in Superstorm Sandy-affected towns are skeptical about the likelihood of community-based rebuilding solutions. 45 percent of 400-plus respondents are pessimistic their towns would be rebuilt better...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Cuyahoga County high school students are smoking tobacco products at the same rate as adults in the county, according to new data. In 2013, more than 22 percent, or one in five high school students, report use of any tobacco product within the prior...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Scientists have long been concerned that global warming may push Earth's climate system across a 'tipping point,' where rapid melting of ice and further warming may become irreversible -- a hotly debated scenario with an unclear picture of what this...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Metastasis, the strategy adopted by tumor cells to transform into an aggressive form of cancer, are often associated with a gloomy prognosis. Managing to block the metastasis or, even better, prevent their formation would be a giant step towards the...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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HIV infection re-shapes the relationship between semen bacteria and immune factors which in turn affects viral load, suggesting that the semen microbiome plays a role in sexual transmission of HIV, researchers report. While HIV is found in many body...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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A new study finds more than 75 percent of the water loss in the drought-stricken Colorado River Basin since late 2004 came from underground resources. The extent of groundwater loss may pose a greater threat to the water supply of the western United...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South Africa have produced tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artifacts, including hand axes and other tools....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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To reduce fire hazard, wildland managers often utilize the silvicultural practice of mechanically cutting woody shrubs and suppressed trees. These cuttings and other post-logging debris are then burned during periods of low fire danger in order to dispose...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Insecticides similar to nicotine, known as neonicotinoids, were found commonly in streams throughout the Midwest, according to a new study. This is the first broad-scale investigation of neonicotinoid insecticides in the Midwestern United States and...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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The planet's current biodiversity, the product of 3.5 billion years of evolutionary trial and error, is the highest in the history of life. But it may be reaching a tipping point. Scientists caution that the loss and decline of animals is contributing...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Researchers say ancestral exposures to the pesticide methoxychlor may lead to adult onset kidney disease, ovarian disease and obesity in future generations.
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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A new congressionally mandated report concludes that the overarching lesson learned from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is that nuclear plant licensees and their regulators must actively seek out and act on new information about hazards...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Friends play an extremely important role in a person’s life. From infancy on, we have a desire to connect and those early relationships help to mold and develop our adult character. Through interactions with one another, we learn to think beyond ourselves...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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While previous studies of individuals have shown that employees who lose their jobs have a higher mortality rate, more comprehensive studies have shown, unexpectedly, that population mortality actually declines as unemployment rates increase. Researchers...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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'Experiential products,' items such as books or musical instruments that are designed to create or enhance an experience, can make shoppers just as happy as life experiences, according to a new study. While life experiences help consumers feel closer...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Psychologists observe that people talk and think about love in limitless ways but underlying such diversity are some common themes that frame how we think about relationships. For example, one popular frame considers love as perfect unity; in another...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Narcissism, considered by some as the 'dark side of the executive personality,' may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed by non-narcissistic executives,...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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A new study has provided hope that previously studied SapC-DOPS could be used for treatment of brain cancer that has spread. "These results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors which...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Neuroscientists have succeeded in providing new insights into how the brain works by analyzing tissue samples from mice to identify how two specific proteins, 'CKAMP44' and 'TARP Gamma-8', act upon the brain's memory center. Brain function depends on...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Cultural stereotypes may be an unintended but inevitable consequence of sharing social information, according to research. Information about people that is initially complex and difficult to remember evolves into a simple system of category stereotypes...
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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Reversing the increasing rate of global biodiversity losses may not be possible without embracing intensive, and sometimes controversial, forms of threatened species management, according to zoologists....
From: Science Daily | Thursday, July 24, 2014
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