Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
When celebrity chef Carl Casper (Jon Favreau) rails on about being creatively stalled throughout the first third or so of Chef, it's clear that Favreau, who wrote and directed the film, is addressing his own struggles as an artist. Working at a high-scale...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Nick Cassavetes delivers a farce with The Other Woman that, like the cheater at the core of the film's narrative, struggles to maintain several identities at once. After Manhattan lawyer Carly (Cameron Diaz) discovers her boyfriend, Mark (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau),...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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In a 1963 interview with The Paris Review, Norman Mailer claimed that "boredom slays more of existence than war." Tayla Lavie's Zero Motivation runs with this idea by capturing the ennui that dishearteningly pervades the human resource offices of an...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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1. "When the People Cheer." Questlove on how hip-hop failed black America. "I want to start with a statement: Hip-hop has taken over black music. At some level, this is a complex argument, with many outer rings, but it has a simple, indisputable core....
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Adapted from Stephen Belber's play of the same name, Match contains only three characters: troubled married couple Lisa and Mike (Carla Gugino and Matthew Lillard) and the sixtysomething Juilliard dance teacher, Tobi (Patrick Stewart), they're visiting...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Roman Polanski's Venus in Fur opens and closes with long, sinuous dolly shots, on-rails moments which feel both magically cinematic and self-consciously silly. Like the proudly low-rent special effects of Alain Resnais's late films, these paired movements—one...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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Toward the end of Aaron Katz and Martha Stephens's Land Ho!, Colin (Paul Eenhorn), an Australian bank worker, breaks into imitations of scenes from Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and Twins while enjoying a wade in the hot springs in Landmannalaugar, Iceland....
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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The last vestige of Avril Lavigne's "punk" bona fides, however thinly veiled and market-tested they were in the first place, evaporated the day she released the bubble-gum cheerleader anthem "Girlfriend" back in 2007. So the singer's de-evolution into...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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"He thought I was a perfect specimen—except for my height," says Lilith (Florencia Bado) in voiceover, describing the reaction of the eponymous character (Alex Brendemühl) when he first encountered her as a beautiful 12-year-old whose stunted growth...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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1. "Rape of Thrones." Why are the Game of Thrones showrunners rewriting the books into misogyny? "It seems more likely that Game of Thrones is falling into the same trap that so much television does—exploitation for shock value. And, in particular,...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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That musty scent wafting from Bad Teacher, based on the raunchy 2011 film starring Cameron Diaz, is partly the product of mothballed cultural allusions and the odd tasteless joke. (The pilot's needless gag about "some Asian teacher" named "Ming Ling...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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Philippe Le Guay's Bicycling with Molière places a modern comedic spin on the titular French playwright's seminal work The Misanthrope, with the film's characters mirroring, to an extent, the rapport between the classic roles in Molière's text. The...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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It's indicative of a deeper malaise that Megan Griffiths's Lucky Them, a film about a jaded Seattle music critic searching for her long-lost pseudo-Cobain rock-star paramour, has very little decent music in it. Instead of the respectable lineup of grunge...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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Fixated on circular rhythms and recurring patterns, the flow of nature and the echo chamber of history, Night Moves is equally focused on the disruption of those cycles, and how such fractures fit within an even broader cyclicality. Entrenched in an...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Tuesday, April 22, 2014
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A healthy ego is pretty much a prerequisite to achieve major success in any art form. So it's understandable that Iggy Azalea would title her debut album The New Classic. While it's a preposterous assertion that this serviceable collection of dance-pop...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, April 21, 2014
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With Richard's Wedding and, now, the vampire horror-comedy Summer of Blood, it's becoming apparent that Onur Tukel is developing a distinct on-screen persona: that of a cynical motormouth whose disaffected hipster veneer masks a core selfishness. Like...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, April 21, 2014
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Although Heaven's Gate is generally considered to be the unqualified disaster that rang a death knell for New Hollywood, William Friedkin's Sorcerer is perhaps a more historically important economic failure. Neither heralded as an artistic achievement...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, April 21, 2014
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Sleep, My Love opens with a promising hint of irrational portent. A beautiful New York socialite, Alison Courtland (Claudette Colbert), awakens on a train headed to Boston with no context of the events leading to her apparently improvised travel arrangements....
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, April 21, 2014
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The day in question in "A Day's Work" is Valentine's Day, and showrunner Matthew Weiner and company crafted an episode riddled with allusions to business as a love affair. When Don (Jon Hamm) is caught taking a meeting with a big shot by a headhunter...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, April 21, 2014
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1. "Building a Bigger Action Hero" A mere six-pack doesn't cut it in Hollywood anymore. Today's male stars need 5 percent body fat, massive pecs, and the much-coveted inguinal crease—regardless of what it takes to get there. "The last-minute pump comes...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, April 21, 2014
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Marc Silver's Who Is Dayani Cristal? attempts to cut through the political rhetoric of the raging debate on illegal immigration debate in the United States. It does so by putting a human face on the issue through an in-depth look at one particular unfortunate...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, April 21, 2014
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In Carl Theodor Dreyer's classic work, a visual style attuned to expressive but uncluttered composition begets a spiritual presence, an incorporeal manifestation of the social evils depicted in the frame. Master of the House, made shortly before the...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, April 21, 2014
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François Ozon could never be called a cold or somber filmmaker, but his notoriety as a ringleader of camp flamboyance has always been misleading. The mainstream success of the gaudy musical 8 Women and satirical pulp exercise Swimming Pool thrust him...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, April 21, 2014
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