Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
Meet Me in Montenegro is yet another movie about a failed writer with no money, in this case Anderson (co-director Alex Holdridge), who miraculously manages to do whatever he pleases, whether it's traveling to Berlin for a script meeting or following...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, July 6, 2015
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Despite its poor rendition at the hands of a cheap Elvis impersonator, "The Rose" is the perfect song for Ray Velcoro (Colin Farrell) to hear as he dreamily drifts between life and death at the start of "Maybe Tomorrow." It's a song that hints at the...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Monday, July 6, 2015
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For a Tarsem Singh production, Self/less noticeably lacks for aesthetic pomp. Save for a fetching superimposition of Central Park and the face of "the man who built New York" that reflects the film's supposed theme of the projection of the self, Singh's...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Saturday, July 4, 2015
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Last night's episode of Hannibal, "Contorno," is both conveniently and poetically ludicrous. Repetition has inescapably set into this season's Italian sojourn, which partially accounts for why last week's superb American flashback episode, "Aperitivo,"...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Friday, July 3, 2015
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The familiar aspects of the French animated film Zarafa, finally getting an American release three years after its international opening, make it feel like it was churned out of Disney in the '90s. There's a hero/villain dynamic that's broadly telegraphed,...
From: Slant Magazine | By: Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani | Friday, July 3, 2015
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