Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

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Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

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What to do:
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  2. Click smileys and frownies
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Andi Zeisler, co-founder of Bitch and author of the new book We Were Feminists Once: From Riot Grrl to CoverGirl, discusses capitalism, breast implants, pop culture, and feminism.
From: The Rumpus | By: Alli Maloney | Monday, July 25, 2016
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By the light of early morning, I am writhing in pain again, the drugs are done. But there is a tiny creature—mammal, female—attached to my breast. That is supposed to make it more bearable.
From: The Rumpus | By: Jennifer Fliss | Sunday, July 24, 2016
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In my desperate attempts to keep my secret I learned to shut everyone out, to become as closed as a fist.
From: The Rumpus | By: Ryan Berg | Monday, July 25, 2016
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At The Coachella Review, Heather Scott Partington and Bruce Bauman talk about postmodern madness and Bauman’s recent novel, Broken Sleep, which examines it all.Related Posts:The Rumpus Interview with Bruce BaumanRus Like Everyone Else by Bette...
From: The Rumpus | By: David Breithaupt | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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Apparently, Jonathan Safran Foer wasn’t the only one exchanging emails with Natalie Portman. At The Millions, Jacob Lambert shares excerpts from the supposed epistolary relationship between the actress and no less than American author Cormac McCarthy.Related...
From: The Rumpus | By: Guia Cortassa | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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In its infinite wisdom, VICE has produced a show for the company’s TV channel, VICELAND, where Action Bronson and his friends smoke themselves into oblivion while they try to grapple with the immensity of history and the cosmos as communicated by...
From: The Rumpus | By: Liz Wood | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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When a writer has said all that he or she has to say, or as much as possible before mortality intercedes, the body of work remains incomplete no matter the size of the output. The taunt persists: That’s it?At the New York Times, Roger Rosenblatt bemoans...
From: The Rumpus | By: Roxie Pell | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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Gabrielle Emanuel writes for NPR’s Education section on the history of math education. Emanuel explores how basic mathematics were kept from becoming the common knowledge they are today, due to the influence of centuries-old taboos around money and...
From: The Rumpus | By: Michelle Vider | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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But the problem of making fiction is just one of the many problems a reborn country must figure out.
From: The Rumpus | By: Sean Carman | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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This year over a thousand people signed up to run for President of the United States. And you thought we had no choices. Craig Tomashoff decided to drive across country and see who some of these candidates are.Related Posts:Father John Misty on Numbness...
From: The Rumpus | By: David Breithaupt | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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Book titles are an essential component of the texts they gesture at. They’re also advertising. At Catapult, Hannah Gersen recounts the naming process for her novel Home Field:A short story title can be fanciful or obscure or may even contribute something...
From: The Rumpus | By: Roxie Pell | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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Amina Guatier reviews The Mercy Journals by Claudia Casper today in Rumpus Books.
From: The Rumpus | By: Amina Gautier | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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In this interview we talk about—well, Juliet especially comes correct about mental health and poetry and honesty and life in West Virginia and why she writes and how terrifying her trailers were for the book and teaching while being bad as fuck and...
From: The Rumpus | By: Guia Cortassa | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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Related Posts:The 18th Century from a BalloonThe Word Cage: TravelA Circus, a KissWeekly GeekeryI’m Sorry, Hal...
From: The Rumpus | By: Dan Bransfield | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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I grew up on a farm in Iowa where my dad has worked every day of his life. He is the hardest working yet most loving man I have ever known.
From: The Rumpus | By: Dale Vande Griend | Tuesday, July 26, 2016
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At The Stranger, Rich Smith describes the Till Writer’s Residency program at Smoke Farm in Arlington, Washington. Unlike most residency programs, which are expensive and require writers to pay for travel, the Till Residency is affordable and aims...
From: The Rumpus | By: Olivia Wetzel | Monday, July 25, 2016
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If you want to change the world, why write poetry?Wayne Koestenbaum, writing for the New York Times, takes a moment to appreciate Adrienne Rich’s body of work via the recently released Collected Poems, focusing on Rich’s ability to sing impassioned...
From: The Rumpus | By: Kyle Williams | Monday, July 25, 2016
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During a performance at WPXN’s XPoNential Music Festival, Father John Misty decided he couldn’t bring himself to give the show his audience expected and delivered a sermon against numbness instead. Criticizing his own role in producing a climate...
From: The Rumpus | By: Liz Wood | Monday, July 25, 2016
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In the first of a two-part series at the Public Domain Review, Lily Ford uses 18th century illustrations and drawings from balloonists to capture the changes in science and society brought by the first people to see the world from the sky....
From: The Rumpus | By: Michelle Vider | Monday, July 25, 2016
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The response to [the Handmaid’s Tale] was interesting. The English, who had already had their religious civil war, said, “Jolly good yarn.” The Canadians in their nervous way, said, “Could it happen here?” And the Americans said, “How long...
From: The Rumpus | By: Kyle Williams | Monday, July 25, 2016
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For Hyperallergic, Allison Meier covers design ideas for nuclear waste warning signs, with scientists and artists around the world attempting to design warning signs that would deter humans 10,000 (or even 100,000) years in the future from digging up...
From: The Rumpus | By: Michelle Vider | Monday, July 25, 2016
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Rumpus founding editor Stephen Elliott answers 5 questions from Filmmaker Magazine about The Rumpus Los Angeles Film Festival happening this Saturday.Related Posts:No related posts…...
From: The Rumpus | By: The Rumpus | Monday, July 25, 2016
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REMINDER: The first-ever Rumpus LO-FI Film Festival is this Saturday, 7/30! A one-day event at the Brewery Arts Complex in Los Angeles, the festival will screen three films, in addition to the world premiere of After Adderall and two awesome panel...
From: The Rumpus | By: Xach Fromson | Monday, July 25, 2016
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At Electric Literature, an anonymous writer shares her personal experience with a creative writing classmate who plagiarized other poets. The writer poses the question of when writing crosses the boundary between respectful mimicry and plagiarism:When...
From: The Rumpus | By: Olivia Wetzel | Monday, July 25, 2016
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Lyz Lenz reviews How to Be a Person in the World by Heather Havrilesky today in Rumpus Books.
From: The Rumpus | By: Lyz Lenz | Monday, July 25, 2016
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A novel wants to befriend you, a short story almost never.Over at VICE, Lincoln Michel nabbed the elusive and brilliant Joy Williams for an interview about her newest short story collection, ninety-nine stories of God. Her answers are wonderful in their...
From: The Rumpus | By: Kyle Williams | Monday, July 25, 2016
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So many websites and posters for The Rumpus LO-FI Los Angeles Film Festival happening this Saturday, July 30. There’s the main page, where you’ll find a downloadable pdf program guide (just like a real film festival!).And there’s the eventbrite...
From: The Rumpus | By: Stephen Elliott | Sunday, July 24, 2016
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Tuesday 7/26: Don’t miss 2014 Minnesota Book Award winner, Sean Hill, reading new work at Augsburg College. The reading takes place on campus, in the Foss Center chapel. 7 p.m., free.Wednesday 7/27: Rain Taxi presents Salman Rushdie reading from his...
From: The Rumpus | By: Tyler Barton | Sunday, July 24, 2016
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Related Posts:More Money, (Not) More ProblemsThe Saturday Rumpus Essay: Valuation MethodsColorful LanguageThe Rumpus Interview with Shulem DeenThe Upper Far East...
From: The Rumpus | By: Brandon Hicks | Sunday, July 24, 2016
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