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Lev Grossman discusses the challenges of writing a series, why his 20s were a lost decade, and his relationship with his readers.
From: The Rumpus | By: Lindsay Whalen | Friday, September 19, 2014
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As reported a week or so ago by Joe Pompeo at Capital, The American Reader plans to abandon its digital platform and turn all of its focus toward print.Related Posts:A Puzzling Gender GapThe Life and Death of TwerkMemory LossRead (and listen to) Long...
From: The Rumpus | By: Alex Norcia | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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And we are, aren’t we, us fiftysomethings? We’re the pierced and tattooed, shorts-wearing, skunk-smoking, OxyContin-popping, neurotic dickheads who’ve presided over the commoditisation of the counterculture; we’re the ones who took the avant-garde...
From: The Rumpus | By: Guia Cortassa | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Ever wonder how to write about other people without getting sued? Well, here are some answers.Another flavor of invasion of privacy is called false light. Suppose you post a photo of a criminal arrest. Jane Doe, a bystander, appears in the picture, a...
From: The Rumpus | By: Lyz Lenz | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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“The House in Sønderhå” is the first from a series of mini comics about places cartoonist Bue Bredsdorff has lived.
From: The Rumpus | By: Bue Bredsdorff | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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It’s hard to imagine rocking out for more than twenty years, without much of a respite, but that is exactly what Spoon have done. The difficult-to-label rock group that formed before Kurt Cobain’s death recently released their eighth studio album,...
From: The Rumpus | By: Max Gray | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Thursday 9/18: The Reed College English department welcomes novelist and short-story writer Lynne Tillman for a reading. Reed College, 6:30 p.m., free.Laila Lalami reads from her latest imagined memoirs of the New World’s first explorer of African...
From: The Rumpus | By: Olivia Olivia | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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For the New York Times Magazine, A.O. Scott argues about the “slow unwinding” of patriarchy in American culture, drawing on modern television, history, and literature. In part responding to Ruth Graham’s essay at Slate, in which she urges against...
From: The Rumpus | By: Alex Norcia | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Bartending, the monologue: what a is a drop bar? The bartender buys a round, he’s a nice guy, the owner of the bar is a little cheap, then they get robbed, the police, the tough Chechens, it turns out the owner is in on it, the dog in the garbage can,...
From: The Rumpus | By: Stephen Elliott | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Many people who buy exclusively e-books still like to browse in physical bookstores and look at physical books.The printed book is far from dead.At BuzzFeed Books, Lincoln Michel has an essay on the future of the ongoing battle between print and e-books—and...
From: The Rumpus | By: Guia Cortassa | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Jeffrey Zuckerman reviews Guantanamo by Frank Smith today in Rumpus Books.
From: The Rumpus | By: Jeffrey Zuckerman | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Despite the horror and hopelessness (see below) that moves through the world, the essayist must have, even if it is well-buried under the most convincing costume of misanthropy, a deep and abiding love of humanity. Essayists set up beacons, send down...
From: The Rumpus | By: Lyz Lenz | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Related Posts:THE BINS: StarsThe Rumpus Interview with Ariel SchragChipping at Wonder WomanSpotlight: Janice L. PascualTHE BINS: Kielbasa...
From: The Rumpus | By: Lucas Adams | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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In Episode 18 of Make/Work, host Scott Pinkmountain speaks with artist and architect Lisa Ward.
From: The Rumpus | By: Scott Pinkmountain | Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Writers often overuse a few unique words, creating a linguistic fingerprint. Vocabulary words are also exchanged between social groups. Some people contribute new words, while others adopt them. The process is not entirely random, though:Diana Boxer,...
From: The Rumpus | By: Ian MacAllen | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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(n.); an unwell feeling, particularly in the head; a moody depression; c. 1918, from Nevil Shute’s The Rose and the RainbowThe archetype of the mad genius dates back to at least classical times, when Aristotle noted, “Those who have been eminent...
From: The Rumpus | By: Sara Menuck | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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The Pew Research Center recently released a report about younger Americans’s (ages 16-29) attitudes toward libraries. As it turns out, young adults still read books, they still visit libraries—at least as much as older Americans—and many use library...
From: The Rumpus | By: Kathryn Sukalich | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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Chris Stroffolino talks to the Rumpus about his new album Griffith Park, recording with the Silver Jews, and his love of poetry.
From: The Rumpus | By: Rob Rubsam | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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Wednesday 9/17: Saint Mary’s College hosts Daniel Alarcón as part of the Creative Writing Reading Series. Free, 7:30 p.m., St. Mary’s College, Soda Center, Claeys Lounge.Cuban National Literature Prize-winning poet and essayist Nancy Morejon reads...
From: The Rumpus | By: Evan Karp | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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The Los Angeles Times surveyed over 200 writers, asked them how they got to where they are, assembled the pieces, and made this.Related Posts:The Rumpus Interview with Dani ShapiroWhy MFA?: The Rumpus Interview with Tom Kealey and Robin TungSo, You Want...
From: The Rumpus | By: Casey Dayan | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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Reading is healthy, but not all reading is created equally. Advocates of slow reading suggest that dedicated periods of thirty to forty-five minutes away from other distractions can lower stress and maximize reading benefits. And reading online content...
From: The Rumpus | By: Ian MacAllen | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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Kenji Liu reviews Aimee Suzara's Souvenir today in Rumpus Poetry.
From: The Rumpus | By: Kenji Liu | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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Portland is home to Street Books, a bicycle-based library that serves the city’s homeless population and day laborers. The project started in 2011 with a temporary grant, but has since flourished into a full-time non-profit. The Oregonian takes a look...
From: The Rumpus | By: Ian MacAllen | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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Click image to enlarge:Related Posts:Maakies: Drunk DriverMaakies: Tiddly-WinksMaakies: Pushmi PullyuMaakies: Dulcet TonesMaakies: Costume Ball...
From: The Rumpus | By: Tony Millionaire | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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I love how paper from that century—or anything over 100 years old—ages and changes color around the edges.
From: The Rumpus | By: Kevin Sampsell | Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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In 1906, aged 21, D.H. Lawrence wrote to his future fiancée Louise Burrows with writing advice after reading an essay on art she’d sent to him. Among many other remarkable lines, the British author told Burrows that “[l]ike most girl writers you...
From: The Rumpus | By: Guia Cortassa | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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With its essential formatting and intricate detail, poetry initially faced difficulties adapting to a convenience-oriented digital market. Luckily, technological advances in e-book publishing have made it possible to preserve the medium in its intended...
From: The Rumpus | By: Roxie Pell | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Inconceivably, unexplainably, and, inevitably, thankfully, Bill Cosby’s on tour again. But even off-stage, he’s been there all his life:In 1976, Cosby earned a doctorate in education from the University of Massachusetts, after writing a dissertation...
From: The Rumpus | By: Bryan Washington | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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“It’s sort of like comparing making a fire and building a house,” he says. “A song is fire. You react to it primarily, instantly. You don’t have to decide whether you like it, and you don’t really have to sit down and think about it much...
From: The Rumpus | By: Guia Cortassa | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Maybe all those rebuffs—the few I gave, the many I received—were just ways of protecting ourselves, those nascent beings so unsure of who we were or what we wanted to become.
From: The Rumpus | By: Randon Billings Noble | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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You probably knew that Lena Dunham wrote a memoir (if you didn’t, she has), but she’d love to remind you why she’s qualified. Meghan Daum elaborates for the New York Times Magazine:To suggest that Dunham is too young, too privileged, too entitled,...
From: The Rumpus | By: Bryan Washington | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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When she realized her local Planned Parenthood was struggling to stay open, author and board member Lauren Groff recruited two-dozen other writers to auction off various literary swag in a fundraising event called The Choice Auction. The group, which...
From: The Rumpus | By: Roxie Pell | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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In the latest installment of “Bookends” at the New York Times, Leslie Jamison and Francine Prose discuss whether a book could ever change a reader’s life in a negative way. While Jamison thinks that “[n]ovels might not make us worse, but they...
From: The Rumpus | By: Guia Cortassa | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Brett Josef Grubisic reviews More Curious by Sean Wilsey today in Rumpus Books.
From: The Rumpus | By: Brett Josef Grubisic | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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In a culture where everything is assigned a market value, imagination isn’t in high demand. Over at The Millions, Chloe Benjamin wonders why some of imagination’s most vivid manifestations—dreams and fiction—fall so low on our priority list:But...
From: The Rumpus | By: Roxie Pell | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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  Related Posts:Cheever HouseFor Sale: John Cheever’s Magical Suburban HomeLadies Drink FreeThe Beyoncé of PoetryYoung Writer Cold, Too Many Drafts...
From: The Rumpus | By: Shelagh Power-Chopra | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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