Serendeputy - your personal news assistant.

Welcome to Serendeputy!

Serendeputy is your personal news assistant.

Your deputy:
- learns what you like and don't like,
- lovingly compiles a list of news and blogs for you.

You can help your deputy learn by searching, clicking links and pressing the little smiley faces.
How it works.

What to do:
  1. Click links to teach your deputy
  2. Click smileys and frownies
  3. Find favorite topics and sources
  4. See how much better your deputy is getting at finding you good stuff.
  5. Sign in for free to save your profile, or please tell me why you won't.
It's not enough to say that Helen Thorpe's Soldier Girls brilliantly pins down the day-to-day malaise of desert war–era military life: the boredom, the gnaw of fear, the uncertainty about what exactly the mission was. Or that the book, which tracks...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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The Theater:Village festival, now in its second year, makes a rare attempt at common cause among this city's many small companies. For that effort alone, the program deserves a closer look; New York boasts thousands of creative theatermakers, but an...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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It doesn't take long for director Anna Shapiro's luminous revival of This Is Our Youth to transport you back to a certain moment of suspension in your life — between thinking you're an adult and becoming one, between lusting for the world and fearing...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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There are the timid plays you watch impatiently, wishing the writer had the guts to stage the more outrageous figments of his imagination. And then there are compulsively enjoyable plays like Bootycandy, Robert O'Hara's exploration of race, queerness,...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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'What produces a present as different, and how does a present focus a past in turn?" A simple question asked in convoluted academic patois, the query kicks off Hal Foster's introduction to The Return of the Real, at one time a massively influential treatise...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Irish director Lance Daly's Life's a Breeze faces a curious dilemma. How to depict the degrading effects of poverty when your central character, 79-year-old grandmother Nan (Fionnula Flanagan), lives in squalor by choice, having saved up close to a million...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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You keep waiting for catastrophe to strike in Roberto Minervini's taciturn Stop the Pounding Heart. The handheld camera drifts without judgment through scenes of home-schooled children in forced prayer, shirtless trailer-park boys riding a makeshift...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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“I’ve spent my whole life playing it safe,” whines Judd Altman (Jason Bateman), the middle-class milquetoast at the center of This Is Where I Leave You. Yes, well, so has director Shawn Levy, but on the basis of his latest vacuous trifle he has...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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'I think you have a problem with people," Rick Smolan (Adam Driver) informs Robyn Davidson (Mia Wasikowska) in the middle of the desert. The utterance comes midway through Tracks, John Curran’s true-story narrative of Davidson’s 1,700-mile 1977 trek...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Terry Gilliam is a gifted, ambitious filmmaker who, sadly, may now be more famous for being misunderstood and underfunded than he is for actually making movies. The Zero Theorem isn't likely to reverse that equation. In this half-squirrely, half-torpid...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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It figures that Michelle Monaghan, one of too many underutilized actresses usually relegated to playing the hero's wife, would have to go shoestring in order to find a role that allows her to display the range of her talents. She's at her best as Army...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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From its crackpot opening — a tied-up, prostrate girl in lingerie poses for a creepy, buck-naked painter — you wouldn't expect Swim Little Fish Swim to play like a New York-set Reality Bites crossed with the most cloying elements of mumblecore cinema...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Simon Pegg has always been more like a cartoon than a real boy. He's one part Charlie Brown to two parts Tintin, a round-faced runt who can channel both childlike depression and old-fashioned cowlicked pluck. In Pegg's new film, Hector and the Search...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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They've done it at last: made a Liam Neeson-stomps-some-ass flick where, as the credits roll, there's more stuff to be glad you saw than Neeson himself. Based on one of those Lawrence Block novels that's pretty smart but also too invested in the mechanics...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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A car's high beams trace slow-motion lightning across the highway. An auto worker in suspenders strides the factory floor. These seductive images of the American automotive industry act as dreamy parentheses to Josh and Rebecca Tickell's compelling and...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Don't expect many laughs from this retro-futuristic curio, which doesn't really go for them, despite its parodic title and its '70s insistence that in the far future, View-Masters would be cutting-edge communication tech. Still, sympathetic audiences...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Joe Sarno may be, in the words of performance artist Annie Sprinkle, "the Ingmar Bergman of porn," but A Life in Dirty Movies doesn't dwell on his accomplishments as a pioneering sexploitation moviemaker. Instead, director Wiktor Ericsson makes Sarno's...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Almost nothing makes sense in Brush With Danger, a bewilderingly incompetent and inexplicably racist Indonesian action film. Written, directed, and produced by stars Livi and Ken Zheng, Brush With Danger pits sibling immigrants Alice and Ken Qiang against...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Should we trust artists to tell the story of artists? On the plus side, who understands them better? If there's a secret language of imagination and creativity, then the members of this sprawling tribe must be the ones who speak it best. On the other...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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The Iceman Cometh, Clarence Fok's 1989 Hong Kong martial arts film, achieved classic status on the strength of Fok's facility with multiple elements: humor that could be silly without being juvenile, dazzlingly choreographed action sequences, a story...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Adam Wingard's confident, swoony, and hilarious thriller The Guest delivers on everything — the sex, the humor, the menace, the cool — and even though it climaxes in a haunted-house maze chase we think we've seen before, we've never seen it this...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Knocking out the first-rate forgeries that fooled 60 American museums? That was a curiously mundane miracle, something for Mark Landis to do while watching TV. A frail and ascetic Mississippian who resembles Michael Stipe playing Truman Capote, Landis...
From: Village Voice | Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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